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Full text of "Pacific Oil Reporter (1904-1905)"






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California state Ubraiy ^ VRY 

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Endorsed by the California Petroleum Miners' Association. 



Vol. 6, No. 1. 



San Francisco, Cal., November 5> 1904* 



Price lO Cents. 



4* 



p&O GAS E NG//V£ c 



S*&y^ Manufacturers of the ^^Q A 

REID TWO CYCLE GA5 ENGINE 



The only reverse gear 
gas engine made that 
has been successfully 
used for drilling, clean' 
ing out, pumping, pull* 




ing tubing and rods, in 
fact any work that 
the regular oil country 
steam engine is used 
for. 



For Prices and Particulars Apply to 



WILLIAM M. GRAHAM 

Pacific Coast Agent, • ■ - * - - COALINGA, CAL. 



PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 



ESTABLISHED 1857. 



LESC HEN'S 

DRILLING CABLES / P SANDLINES 
^ S °CASING/ P TUBING LINES 



BRANCH OFFICES 
WAREHOUSES: 



NEW VORK 



DENVER 



CH ICAOO. 




WE ARE AGENT* FOR 

LEgCHPN LINES... R. H. HEBRON COMPANY 

AN» CARRY THEM IN STOCK AT 
•AN FRANCISCO, CAL. LOS ANGELBS, CAL. 



A BUSINESS PROPOSITION 



We all seek the most comforts In 
this life at the minimum expenditure 
of labor or cash. If you are going 
East you will find the 

Union Pacific 

ahead of all others on the above 
basis. At the same time you reach 
your destination quicker. 
Drop me a postal and I will call and 
explain everything. 



S. P. BOOTH, 

General Agent U. P. R. R. Co. 
No. 1 Montgomery Street, San Francisco. 



Alaska Mosquito Head Net 

A Perfect Protection Against Insect Pests 




1 Adopted by the United States 
Government as the Standard for 
use in the army. 

Over 150,000 of these nets sent 
to the Philippines. 

Invented for and in general u»e 
in mosquito-infested Alaska. 

Folds up compactly and goes 
easily into the pocket. 

Made of specially prepared gal. 
yanized steel wire and the finest 
and strongest netting. 

Invaluable for hunters, campers 
and travelers. 

Can be worn day or night with- 
out inconvenience. 



Made in Two Varieties. 

No. 1. Made of finest netting, sure protection against mosquitos. 50 cents. 
No. 2. Made of very fine, but strong, imported lace, for midges and black 
flies, $1.00. 

If your dealer does not handle them, write direct 
to the manufacturer and we will mail on receipt of 
price. 

ALASKA MOSQUITO HEAD NET CO. 

318 PINB STREET SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 



i»->9 1 l ^ 



PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 



Vol. 6. No. 1 



San Francisco, Cal., Saturday, Nov. 5, 1904 



Price Ten Cents 



PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 

Published Weekly. 

The Oil Authority of the Pacific Coast. 

Endorsed by California Petroleum Miners' Ass'n. 



MARIA R. WINN, Proprietor. 
EASTMAN, Editor and Manager. 



OFFICE AND EDITORIAL ROOMS 

318 Pine Street - - San Francisco, California 
Telephone, Bush 176. 



TERMS. 

On* Year »2 60 

Six Months 1 60 

Thres Months 1 00 

Sing-Is Coplss 10c 

STRICTLY IN ADVANCE. 

Money should be sent by Postal Order, Draft or 
Registered Letter, addressed to Pacific Oil Reporter, 
118 Pine Street, San Francisco, rooms 31-32-33. Com- 
munications must be accompanied by writer's name 
and address, not necessarily for publication, but as 
a guarantee of good faith. 

Entered in the Postoffice at San Francisco, Cali- 
fornia, as second class matter. 

Latest Quotations 



Following are the latest quotations for Cali- 
fornia crude oil at the wells: 



COALIN'GA. 



Gravity at 60° temperature. 



Prices 
per barrel. 



Oil of 22° up to but not including 24°. . 
Oil of 24° up to but not including 25°. . 
Oil of 25 : up to but not including 26° . . 
Oil of 26° up to but not including 27°. . 
Oil of 27° up to but not including 28° . . 
Oil of 28° up to but not including 29° . . 
Oil of 29° up to but not including 30° . . 



.20 
.30 

.35 
.40 
.45 
.50 
.55 



Fuel Oil 14° or better lty4 

KERN. • 

t4° or better I2%c 

EASTERN QUOTATIONS. 

South Neodesha $ -87 

North Neodesha 67 

Bartlesville 87 

Pennsylvania 1 . 56 

Tiona 1.71 

Corning 1.33 

New Castle 1.43 

North Lima 1-05 

South Lima 1-00 

Indiana 1-00 

Corsicana, light 85 

Corsicana, heavy 50 

Kansas, heavy 49 

Bartlesville (I. T.) .90 

Somerset 1-01 

Ragland 60 

Petrolea (Ont.) 1.53 

TEXAS. 

Beaumont 35 

Sour Lake 35 

Saratoga 35 

Batson 33 

SANTA MARIA. 

Gravity at 60° Price per Barrel 

Temperature. at Port Harford. 

25° up to but not including 26° $ .50 

26° up to but not including 27° 55 



p to but not including 2S" 60 

> to but not including 29 65 

- to but not including 30° 70 

ip to but not including 31° 75 

31 up to but not including i2° 80 

and up 85 



Kerosene, Pearl, per gal., m'^c; Astral, 
iq' L c; Star, io'-jc; Extra Star, 24c; Eocene, 
23c; Elaine, 26c; Water White, in bulk, 13c; 
do 150 deg., 13c; do, extra fine, 15c; Mineral 
Seal, iron bbls., 18c; wooden bbls., 20'->c; do, 
cs., 24c ; Deodorized Stove Gasoline, in bulk, 
5c; do, in cs., 22'.^; 86 deg. Gasoline, in bulk, 
25c; cs., 31c; 83 deg. Naphtha or Benzine, de- 
odorized, in bulk, per gal., 13c; do, in cs., icjVaC. 



The utilization of oil fuel in locomotives for 
use in the Hoosac Tunnel on the line of the 13. 
& M. Ry. has provided for an annoyance that 
for many years the officers of that system seemed 
to be unable to contend with. The writer once 
held a position with the B. & M. Ry. where his 
principal duty was in connection with the move- 
ment of trains through the above named tunnel; 
we therefore know some thing of the conditions 
existing there. The greatest care was always 
maintained and a block system so arranged that 
but one train could be in the tunnel at a time in 
each direction, the system being double track. 
Owing to the grade from both directions the en- 
gines were obliged to "work steam" and we well 
remember the clouds of smoke and gas vomited 
forth from the mouth of the tunnel. The chief 
danger lay in the possibility of suffocation of the 
entire crew from gas in case a train became 
stalled on the grade. This nearly occurred once 
during our stay there ; the onljr thing that saved 
the lives of at least eight men being that the air 
brakes became released and the train backed out of 
the tunnel of its own accord. All of the crew 
were much overcome but were resusficated. About 
four years ago, shortly after the completion of the 
Cascade tunnel on the Great Northern Railway 
a coal-burning engine was stalled midway in the 
tunnel and the crew, although they made an at- 
tempt to escape, were overcome and later the 
rescuing party found part of them in a very pre- 
carious condition, and one or two of them, having 
fallen face down into a water ditch beside the 
track had suffocated. The officials of the com- 
pany tried various experiments with fuel after 
this, using anthracite coal, wood and coke with 
the result that sufficient steam pressure could not 
be maintained, which, together with the danger 
from gas, caused the company to install an elec- 
tric system to move trains through this tunnel. 
If oil fuel had been installed on engines passing 
through this tunnel no other change would have 
been required as it would have been possible to 
keep up steam pressure without danger from gas 
and in the event of an engine becoming stalled it 
would be possible to at once extinguish the fire 
by the single turning of a stop-cock. The question 
of fuel for engines through tunnels on the various 
railways of the country has been a serious one 
and the fact that never has a passenger train been 
stalled in a tunnel under these conditions is con- 



sidered In us as little short ■•' a miracle. An in 
cidenl of this kind might ha' e 1 uised the sul 
tion of a multitude of people by the inhaling ol 

gas from the burning coal. The question 
nel motive power is now thorough]) sulved by 
the application ol oil fuel and if death's occur 
through the negleci ol an 1 to utilize it 

the officials should be held accountable. 



It is now the "Reiser" well in the 8 
Maria field that is "doing things" lliat surprise 
its owaers. Recently a pocket of gas was 
that threw the sand pump over onto an ad 
ing lease and the well did. something like one 
thousand barrels in a few hours. On top of tin' 
comes the report that Graciosa No. 3 is doing 
800 barrels a day, making that company a 1200 
harrel production from two wells. At this rate 
the Santa Maria field is going to produce more 
oil than any yet opened up in the State. The 
field covers more area than perhaps the combined 
area of the other fields of California. The land 
is held in large tracts; so that there will be little 
room for the stock jobber. However, people 
who can obtain leases should have but little 
trouble in raising the money for drilling. The 
great thickness of the oil-bearing strata, con- 
ceded to be at least 1,000 feet, assures a per- 
manency unsurpassed by any of the fields of the 
country. The great Newlove tract of 3500 
acres, practically all proven, remains virgin oil 
territory. Conditions are such that it can not 
be subdivided and the price asked for the entire 
tract is beyond the pocketbook of even the ma- 
jority of successful oil men. This price has been 
gradually crawling up from the initial figure, 
one million, until it seems that its subdivision 
will be about the only way to effect its dispo- 
sition. The Santa Maria field is going to be 
the scene of some lively times that will make 
the old Pennsylvania days look cheap. The 
chances of making fortunes in the district are 
just as good as they have ever been in an)' other 
field with the natural advantage that a few miles 
of pipe line would gravitate the product onto tank 
steamers. One of the strongest arguments in 
favor of this new field is that there is more home 
than outside capital invested in the companies 
operating there. 



Associated Press reports from New York an- 
nounce the destruction by fire at that port of the 
oil-burning steamship Nebraska. The fire origi- 
nated at the pier at which the fated steamer was 
tied up and so rapidly did the flames spread that 
she was ablaze before the crew could be ar 
and they were obliged to jump overboard to 
their lives. 

A notable feature of the fire is that, alth 
the steamer's tanks were nearly full of oil. 
was no explosion, although the boat burn 
the water line. The theory tb.it once pr< • 
that in the installation of oil fuel great risk:, 
run is gradually giving way to tin opinio! 
oil is as safe a fuel as coal ; this being further 
stanciated by the fact thai 

make the same rates on oil burners that they do 
on coal-burning vessels. 



PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 



Natural Gas in California 

j& & By A. S. COOPER, M. E. j& j£> 






SUBSIDENCES. 



Attending the uplifting and the metamorphism 
of mountains there must have been subsidences of 
the superincumbent unaltered rocks to fill the 
space caused by the contraction of the rocks 



crushed, nor does the movement take place at 
one time, but may continue for years. These 
subsidences in all probability reach metamorphic 
rocks and rocks undergoing metamorphism, the 
cracks and fissures made by the subsidence be- 
come vents for gases generated during metamor- 
phism. 




V/V/fA/OWA/ //VT£tfl/AL 

Fig. 8 is a diagrammatic view of an anticline with its arch broken by the contraction and subsidences 
of the underlying rocks. A similar anticline exists on the ocean shore at the western bound- 
ary of the rancho Jesus Maria, Santa Barbara County. The springers of the arch still re- 
main. The broken shales and sandstones are greatly silicified, the interstices of the rocks 
being filled with chalcedonic silicia. Some of the silicified shales are of a light color, others 
are black, while others are banded black and white. The black color was caused by the 
bitumen being present during the silification of the shale. Some of the silica has crystal- 
lized forming black crystals. Sometimes vesicals occur in the shale which are filled with 
asphaltum. While these shales were in the plastic state they were bent and crumbled. 
Some of the radii of the bending being but a few inches while others are a number of feet. 
Since the silica has hardened, the rocks have been broken, jointed and cracked into blocks 
of greater or less size. At the present time these cracks and joints are filled with gypsum 
and shining asphaltum. The intimate mixture shows that they were contemporaneously 
deposited. The asphaltum is very pure and contains but little silt. Some of the asphaltum 
is brittle and some tacky. The fissures and seams in the rock probably extend to a great 
depth and it is from these depths that hot alkaline solutions of silicia ascended and filled the 
■ pores of the rocks. In the ocean over this broken anticline gas is frequently seen disturbing 
the surface of the water. 



At a depth of 500 to 1000 feet the subsidence 
due to coal workings amounts to about fifty per 
cent, of the' thickness excavated. Sometimes 
these subsidences continue during as much as four 
years. The contraction in a formation when 
burned to a porcelanite is about one-tenth of its 
original volume. A formation burned to a depth 
of 1 ,000 feet would give a subsidence on the sur- 
face of 100 feet or taking the amount of subsi- 
dence as shown by coal workings would give a 
subsidence of fifty feet in depth. 

Scattered through Santa Barbara county are 
over 1000 acres which have undergone subsidence 
and some of which is still subsiding. The 
amount of the depression is from 20 to 60 feet, 
with an average of 40 feet, and .there may be 
many more acres which have undergone subsi- 
dence that have ascaped observation, or which are 
or were not visible on the surface. 

These subsidences are due to contraction of 
sedimentary rocks by metamorphic heat, forming 
burnt shales, jaspers and pseudo — volcanic rocks, 
also by cooling and consequent contraction of 
pseudo-volcanic rocks, also by the leaching of 
lime, salt and other soluble materials from the 
formation. 

During the earthquakes at Los Alamos, Santa 
Barbara county, near Laguna Seca, about eight 
miles from Los Alamos, pieces of shale were 
hurled into the air from a ledge of shale by es- 
caping gases, to the terror of two Spaniards that 
were passing the place at the time. These trav- 
elers put spurs to their horses and rapidly disap- 
peared down the valley. Laguna Seca is one of 
quite a number of subsidences that exist in the 
hills south of the Los Alamos Valley. 

These subsidences generally cover from one to 
ten. acres, frequently fifty acres and rarely two 
hundred acres. Many of these subsidences can 
be found scattered throughout the Coast Ranges 
of California and on the eastern side of the Sac- 
ramento and San Joaquin Valleys. When one 
forms the bed of a lake bubbles of gas can be 
frequently seen ascending through the water. 
Gas is always found in the vicinity of these sub- 
sidences exhaling from the surface of the earth 
or in springs and wells. Probably many hun- 
dreds of subsidences have occurred below the 
surface of the Great Valley, but have been filled 
up by the debris carried by the streams. 

Six miles west of Santa Barbara, on the Ca- 
lera Rancho, and on the ocean shore, an area of 
twenty acres has subsided some 25 feet. Of this 



through the action of heat and also caused by the 
cooling of the rocks produced by metamorphism. 
The breaking and division of the unaltered 
rocks lying above and adjoining the places where 
metamorphic action is in progress facilitates met- 
amorphic changes. It is like placing broken coal 
upon a fire, the interspaces between the pieces 
permitting the circulation of gases, minerals and 
heat. 

The breaking and contortion of the metamor- 
phic rocks have been attributed to the dynamic- 
force exerted in the uplifting and plication of 
the mountains. While this force is responsible 
for this broken and contorted state in part, the 
greater part must have been effected by subsi- 
dence and the warping of the rocks by the heat 
of metamorphism. 

Subsidences are not faults. They usually form 
a centrocline and the depression is always greater 
at the center than at the periphery. Many of 
the depressions are bowl shaped and are called 
"ollas" by the Spaniards. Many of these depres- 
sions now form the beds of lakes. In the same 
area these subsidences are repeated many times. 
The entire area does not subside at the same 
time and it is therefore greatly broken and 




Fig. 9 is a piano-section of a portion of the La Patera Mine showing fissures filled with asphaltum. 
La Patera Mine lies about nine miles west of Santa Barbara city. It was discovered by the 
writer in 1887, and has since yielded about 28,000 tons of asphaltum, containing 60 per cent, 
of bitumen. It is at the end of a lake which covers an area of about 60 acres. Along the 
periphery of the lake the stratification of the shale dips toward the lake at an angle vary- 
ing from 30 to 40 degrees. At a depth of 100 feet below the surface this mine had a temper- 
ature of 105 degrees Fahr. The asphaltum after being mined and placed in the runs, the 
occluded gas expanded, forming many holes which made the asphaltum look like a sponge. 
Off the shore petroleum and gas rises from submarine springs, the oil covering a large 
surface of the ocean with an iridescent film. The odor of the oil can be detected at a long 
distance. 






PACIFIC OIL REPOK 



subsidence four feet occurred in five years. The 

••rd and seamed, 
and from these rifts and seams sulphurous 
other . nd. The pound is hot and the 

bluff is composed of burnt shall - tints 

.1 cream < iirilliant red. \ l 

^•rp from the hax- of the bluff. 
Shales with carbonaceous material, shales satu- 



thc island of Trinadad, nearl) 
half waj between the capital and in Indian vil- 
suddenly and was replaced b\ a small 
h to the urrat consternation of the in- 
habitants. A similar subsidence at an earlier 
period has given rise to tin- great Pitch Lake of 
Trinidad, the cavity having become gradually 
tilled with asphalt In 1SI2 the bottom of Recl- 




in the northwesi 
nnessee subs 
indications of ..t!,. i , 

sippi River. Jui 
fornia natural g.i- should 
ritorj mentioned. 
Subsidences aU<> occur in the coastal ill. ■ - 

'.1 TlA.ls. 

Observations of tne Board 
at tHe Hoosac Tunnel 



Fig. 10 is an imaginary section through a fault. 



The progressii in the number of oil- 

fuel installations foi locomotive work particu- 
larly interested the Bureau of Steam Engineering, 
and through tin- courtesy of the officials of the 
Atchison, Topeka and Santa Fc, ami of the Bos- 
ton anil Maine railroads, reliable ami valuable 
data and important drawings concerning such in- 
stallations were placed at the disposal of the 
boa rd. 

A special visit was made to the Hoosac Tun- 
nel, where the application of oil fuel to four of 
the locomotives of the Boston and Maine Rail- 
road had been effected. Oil-burning locomotives 
had been used there in order to keep the tunnel 



rated with bitumen, and smokey looking shales 
surround the hot places. 

Near the hot places heavy petroleum oil ooze 
through the shales. To the eastward and west- 
ward heavy and thick petroleum tars ascend 
through the cracks, seams and joints of the shale. 

A portion of the San Miguel Island, lying 
south of the Santa Barbara Channel, subsided 
some years ago. 

West of the Rincon Creek, near the shore of 
the ocean and near the boundary line between 
Santa Barbara and Ventura counties, are a num- 
ber of subsidences shown in Fig. 11. East of 
the Rincon Creek the bluff of the ocean has been 
burning for a long number of years. Above the 
ocean level is a large amount of burnt shales. 
Below the surface of the ocean these burnt shales 
have been converted to banded jaspers of red 
and yellow. Near the summit of the bluff 
heated gases are constantly given off. In a cold 
. day the moisture in these gases condense and be- 
come visible. Large beds of bituminized shales 
and sands are found in the neighborhood of these 
burning shales and subsidences. 

About ninety years ago a spot of land on the 







■1 




g3£T-- 






/h s. Coo^ey 



Fig. 11 is a picture of a subsidence on the side of Mt. Pinal, Santa Barbara County. The fissures 
caused by the subsidence are filled with plastic asphaltum which must have ascended from 
a depth of 1500 feet, as wells drilled around Mt. Pinal show that the nearest petroleum oil 
lies at that depth below the surface. In all probabi lity the fissures extend to a still greater 
depth. A large amount of gas is found in the wells drilled on the slopes of Mt. Pinal. 




■A S CaofccY 



Fig. 12 is a view of a subsidence near Chittenden, Santa Cruz County. In the upper part of the view 
are the hills south of the Pajaro River. Mineral water, petroleum oil and natural gas 
ascend through the formation surrounding this lake. 



clear of the smoke that issued from the stacks 
when the coal burners were put to severe work 
while traversing the tunnel. 

The Hoosac Tunnel is 4^ 4 miles long, anil 
there is a grade each way within the tunnel of 
20 feet to the mile. Until oil-burning helping 
locomotives were attached to each train it was im- 
possible to keep the tunnel clear of smoke and 
steam. Therefore in the oil fuel installation of 
these four locomotives it was essential to effect 
complete combustion, so that there would be 
practically no smoke issuing from the stack, a 
desideratum that is of great importance to rail- 
road tunnel work. 

The board, accompanied by Lieut. John Hal- 
ligan, Jr., U. S. N., not only rode back and 
forth through the tunnel on an oil-burning 
motive, but carefully inspected the entire equip- 
ment of the plant, special attention bein^ 
to the question of storage and supply. 

For special information in regard to the Hoosac 
Tunnel oil-fuel locomotives, as well as to other 
railroad installations, the board is indepted to W. 
D. Hoffman, the fuel-oil expert of the Standard 
Oil Company. This expert has likewise been in 
charge of the work of installing liquid-fuel ap- 



. 6 



PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 



pliances on locomotives in Florida, as well as 
in other sections of the country, and the board is 
under obligations to him for valuable suggestions 
in regard to effecting such installations on torpedo 
boats. 

The most important change made in the Hoo- 
sac Tunnel locomotives for burning oil in- 
stead of coal was in the fire-box arrangement. 
The ash pan is replaced by a special pan, which 
is bolted to the lower ring of the water leg, and 
supports the fire-brick lining and arch, as well 
as the dampers. The fire brick is laid up in al- 
ternate courses of headers and stretchers, al- 
though in front a single course of stretchers may 
be used, except in the center wall, which braces 
the arch to the tube sheet. At the back end of 
the box a tie wall is built in, resting on angle 
irons, to stay the side walls. The damper is ar- 
ranged so that it may be entirely closrd for hold- 
ing the steam pressure with a light fire. 

The burner is of ingenious construction, con- 
sisting of a double burner — a narrow one on top 
and a wide one below. Both are flat, or slot, 
burners, with the steam orifice arranged behind 
that for the oil, so as to blow steam through 
the stream of oil. A large air opening is pro- 
vided near the burner, to admit air for initial 
combustion, while the damper at the rear of the 
box : furnishes what more is necessary. This 
burner has given satisfaction, having never be- 
come stopped up. With the small burner it is 
possible to adjust the fire very low for the pur- 
pose of holding steam during long waits or de- 
lays, while with both burners a capacity beyond 
_ any ; possible requirement is available. 

The arrangement of the steam and oil piping 
for the burner is very simple. Oil is fed directly 
trorfi the tender tank to the burners under 5 to 
10 bounds air pressure (from brake reservoir), 
and the steam is likewise controlled by throttle 
valves, all of which valves have their handles lo- 
cated conveniently in the cab. The piping is, as 
shown, conveniently fitted with brass unions, to 
facilitate taking the burner down, and bends are 
used in place of fittings wherever possible. A 
steam connection is run to the tender, through a 
reducing valve, to .supply the tank heater, and an- 
other steam connection is "arranged outside the 
cab to supply the steam oil pump at the storage 
station when filling the tender tank. 

In regard to the similarity of conditions and 
requirements of oil fuel installations for locomo- 
tive and torpedo-boat work, the following advant- 
ages are practically obtainable in both cases : 

(a) Economy of space reserved for carrying 
fuel. 

(b) Ease in filling tanks. 

(c) Rapidity of time in meeting a varying 
load on boiler. 

(d) Ability to force boiler to extreme duty 
in case of emergency. 

(e) Absence of smoke under light normal 
working conditions. 

(f) Short height of stack. 

(g) Superior personnel available for the op- 
eration of the burners. 

(h) Ability to secure and maintain higher 
speed with oil fuel than with coal. 

The board considers that the eradication or 
mitigation of the smoke nuisance in torpedo boats 
is intimately connected with the question of 
baffling, and the commanders of the various tor- 
pedo boat flotillas could render the Bureau an 
inestimable service by making experiments with 
various forms of baffling. In the smaller or bent- 
tube type of water-tube boilers the most important 
problem. now confronting experts is a systematic 
arrangement of baffling whereby combustion can 
be effected within the tubes instead of within the 



smokestack. A special design of baffling will have 
to be arranged for each distinct type of water-tube 
boiler. 

The evaporative capacity of the boilers ob- 
tained under these conditions was not great, but 
the board believes that with further investigation 
and experiment more satisfactory results as re- 
gards evaporative output will be secured. 

The comparative study of oil-fuel installations 
for torpedo boats in connection with the develop- 
ment of locomotive oil burning is worthy of 
special and further investigation by the depart- 
ment, and the good of the service would be sub- 
served by detailing some of the commanders of 
the torpedo boats to special temporary duty in 
observing and reporting upon the work performed 
by the oil-burning locomotives of the Atchison, 
Topeka and Santa Fe and Southern Pacific Rail- 
road systems. — Oil Fuel Board. 



The Whiting Refinery 



The Standard Oil refinery at Whiting, Ind., 
was established in 1889, when two sections of 
land were purchased from Jacob Forsyth and 
Henry Scharge, says a writer in Popular Me- 
chanics. It was from the beginning the Stan- 
dard Company's the largest plant and the world's 
largest refinery, and it has been added to and 
improved since then until its capacity is now more 
than doubled. At present there are more than 
200 stills in which crude oil is refined on the 
same principle that is employed in destilling 
whiskey. The oil stills are immense kettles under 
which furnaces are kept burning. The vapor 
passes through coiled pipes cooled by water and is 
thus eondensed into various oil products. 

An eight-inch pipe line, reaching to the refinery 
from Lima, O.,, 200 miles, and fed by wells of 
the Ohio and Indiana fields en route, furnishes 
the present crude oil supply. There are pumping 
stations 50 miles apart all along this pipe line, 
and at each station there are about ten men em- 
ployed. : The cost of transporting the oil 
through this pipe line is about one-tenth of what 
it would be if shipped by rail. The line pumps 
into Whiting each day an amount of oil averag- 
ing 300 cars, which is the present capacity of the 
plant. This capacity is to be greatly increased 
when the proposed improvements are made and 
when the great inter-state pipe line S3'Stem is in 
operation. 

The oil on reaching the plant through the pipe 
line is pumped into the immense storage tanks, 
of which there are 112 at the Whiting works. 
Each of these tanks holds 90,000 barrels of oil. 
The tanks are each 90 feet in diameter and 60 
feet' high. The oil which comes through the 
pipe line in excess of the consumption is stored in 
the tanks. . The entire works covering 1,200 
acres are" connected with this 8-inch pipe line 
that supplies the plant. The connecting lines, 
of which there are a myriad, stretch in all direc- 
tions above ground and underground. 

All the products that can be manufactured 
from crude oil are made at the" Whiting plant. 
There is manufactured everything from naphtha 
and the finest illuminating oils to tar and paraffin 
wax, from which chewing gum and wax caridles 
are made. It seems odd to think- chewing gum" 
is made from kerosene oil, but even this has been 
accomplished through Rockefeller's exertions to 
convert oil into as many uses as .possible. 

The Whiting refinery, as well as being the 
center of the new pipe line system, is the world's 



academy of the oil industry. Here are discovered 
all the new oil products; the new methods of 
handling and refining, and men are employed to 
do nothing else except devise new and improved 
ideas. M. W. Burton, superintendent of the 
plant,, is one of the world's most famous expert 
oil chemists. He has under him a corps of ex- 
perts whose sole duty is to experiment with the 
oil to see what can be done with it; what new 
products can be made from it ; what new methods 
for handling it can be discovered. Painful and 
serious accidents have several times happened to 
the chemists, it is said, from the dangerous gases 
produced from the oils, but their work goes on 
uninterruptedly year in and year out. The 
chemists have before them a miniature oil refin- 
ery containing every department of the big, real 
plant and experiments are made continuously 
with a view of improving each and every line of 
the work. It is due to these chemists' efforts 
that so many different kinds of products are now 
obtained from crude oil. 

• The first product of the still as the vapors con- 
dense are the lighter oils, such as naphtha, gaso- 
line, etc. As the condensation proceeds on down 
the worm the heavier products result. They are 
such as ordinary kerosene, lubricating oils, fuel 
oils, etc. Each still is allowed to run about one 
week, when the fires are drawn and it is cleaned 
out. In the bottom of the still is a sediment that 
has formed, and this is called oil coke. It is the 
universal fuel of Whiting, Ind., little coal or 
wood being used by any of the residents of that 
city. The coke sells for $3.50 a ton. It is much 
lighter and goes much further than a ton of hard 
coal. It saved the people of Whiting and adjoin- 
ing districts from suffering during the coal 
famine. Until a few years ago this sediment was 
used to fill sloughs and men were hired to haul it 
away. 

Even -after the pipe line is shut off there is a 
deadly gas that escapes from the stills after the 
fire is drawn, and numerous fatal accidents have 
resulted to men who have entered to remove the 
coke too early. Always, however, the men go 
down into the stills before they are cooled. They 
wear wooden shoes to prevent the heated sediment 
from burning their feet. 

In making paraffin wax, one of the most im- ' 
portant industries of the establishment, the 
crude oil is distilled into a dense, almost solid 
substance. The wax is perfectly white and not 
disagreeable to the taste. Tar manufacture is 
another important industry at the plant. There 
are numerous tar stills and the tar is produced by 
another method of distillation. 

Besides the men whose duty it is to study out 
new products that can be obtained from oil, their 
is a corps of expert mechanics employed to devise 
means of economizing labor, of substituting ma- 
chinery for hired help; and it is wonderful to note 
the success of their efforts. Everywhere about 
the plant there. is the. rush and roar of extreme 
energy and exertion, but the part the men play 
in the great manufactory is small. Improved; ma- 
chinery is doing t)ie work; not that the employees 
are fewer than they ever were before, but! the 
capacity of ;he plant is daily increased b'y^new 
contrivances that make one man's efforts, pro- 
ductive of greater results. In the entire Whiting 
plant a veritable Colossus of modern industry, 
but 2,500 men are employed. The pay roll Aver- 
ages. $RO,006'a month. Shoveling coal requires 
the efforts of more men than any other single 
occupation, and it is a puzzle to the outsideiWorld 
to explain -why the plant that handles mort oil 
than any other plant in existence should itself 
burn coal instead of fuel oil. It takes 700 men to 
lift the coal' shovels that fire the Whiting plant, 
which burns 200 car loads of coal in a day. 



PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 



Cost of Oil as Fuel 



Probably no more striking tuallj 

showing the relative commercial value of coal and 
a fuel could be presented than h\ stating 
that the Al mta Ke Railroad 

ianj made the following comparative tests 
of the cost per train mile of coal costing $6.65 per 
ton and petroleun £1.33 per barrel. 

enty-five passenger and freight engines on a 
run. used 2,l>77 tons ot oil and traveled 
4 1. 1 ' per ton. or 3,500 miles per 
month per engine. Oil at $1.33 per barrel would, 
at this figure, cost 14.4 cents per mile. Twenty- 
five passenger and freight engines, (same days, 

same track, and same condition) burning coal, 
ents per mile. The oil was 1 5 deg, 
fSaumc: this showed a saving for oil of 38 per 
cent., and the experiment was tried with coal at 
$6.65 per ton. 

In this extended and practical test, the cost of 
the oil per barrel was one-fifth of the cost of coal 
per ton, while the resulting gain for oil was 38 
per cent. Stated in another form, the value of 
the two fuels would be the same when the price 
of the coal in tons was three and one-half times 
the price of the oil in barrels. 

Statistics showing the respective prices of crude 
oil at New York, San Francisco and Point Sa- 
bine as well as the prices at the Pennsylvania and 
California wells will show the exceeding cheap- 
ness of the San Francisco product, and of the 
stability in price as compared with the Texas and 
particularly with the Pennsylvania yield. These 
prices, studied in connection with the oil produc- 
tions of the various districts, ought to show the 
field for marine uses of crude petroleum that 
will eventually be found in the Gulf of Mexico 
and along the California coast. 

The fact that the Atchison, Topeka & Santa 
Fe Railroad Company was compelled to pay 
$1.33 per barrel for fuel oil, although the road 
traversed an oil district, is striking evidence of 
the increase in cost over the price at the wells to 
the consumer by reason of the expense attendant 
upon light refining and transportation. 



Petroleum in the 
Philippines 

The advent of Americans in the Philippine 
Islands is said to have greatly stimulated the 
development of the oil fields. The Spaniards used 
to procure illuminating oils from some of the 
wells of Luzon, Panay and Negros, but their 
drilling machinery, refining devices, and modes 
of distribution were extremely defective. During 
the last twenty-five years Filipino capitalists have 
been working at the oil wells and, with the aid 
of the Japanese, have developed some of the wells 
that produce the best grades of oil. The Chinese 
have also taken a hand in the oil industry of the 
islands. Recently some of the American dis- 
charged soldiers have been working at the prob- 
lem of furnishing the islands with their own 
illuminating oils and exporting some of the re- 
fined oils. Through them the industry has been 
extended, but lack of .capital has hindered them 
in their work. American capitalists are now in- 
terested in developing the richest deposits of the 
country, and have arranged for the purchase 
of the necessary plants. At the present time there 
are several well established and paying plants in 
the islands. One which is located at Isadro, 
near Manila, is obliged to run day and night 
and tax its machinery to full capacity in order 
to meet its orders. A number of minor oil re- 
fineries distributed throughout the islands are 



said to be doing a gimd business and malting 

When pumped from the earth the Phil- 
ippine oil are usual I) dark green in color. Kv 
refining an average of S per cent, ben/ine is pro- 
duced from the crude petroleum and about 4;) 
per cent, illuminating oil. The remainder i 
oil and tar. From the latter paraffin is ex- 
tracted. Tin- cost ot getting the crude oil is ven 
low as compared with the expense in most other 
countries. Labor at the wells is extreme!) cheap, 
ranging from Id to 12 cents a day. For this 
price both the native and Chinese laborers give 
a full day's work and provide their own lodging 
ami sustenance, (hi the island <>i Panay are de- 
posits of oil located from -'(Hi to 500 feet below 
the surface. On the islands of Negros, I'chu 
and Mindanao oil strata are worked to good ad- 
vantage by native and foreign capitalists. The 
position of these islands would certainly indicate 
the probable existence of petroleum, as Borneo, 
on the southwest, and Formosa and Japan, on the 
north, contain productive areas that are exten- 
sivelj operated. The best oil appears to be con- 
tained in a stratum consisting of rocks, gravel, 



gains that much; it n goes down lie loses. If he 
c notice the S 
m the mark' 
day alter running. Phis i 
hut once. Fast wintei w hei 
advancing a Chanut 
notice of his "election" and on the 
check was drawn to his order at the m 
lor that day. When the producei linallj 
lie « as surprised. 

In the F.as( ii used to he the custom • 
Standard if a tan's ol nil .■ I ui ed or lost in 
any way, I" prorate the loss among the prod 
This is not done in Kansas. 

The Prairie Oil and Gas Companj deducts 3 
per cent, from all oil received into its custody on 
account of dirt and sediment. 

When an operator runs his oil the ganger 
gives him a certificate, or memorandum. Forty 
hours after the run is made the owner may go to 




NOS. 2 AND 3 OF THB GRACIOSA Co., NOW DOING 1200 BARRELS DAILY. 



and sand nearly twenty feet in thickness, lying 
about 400 feet below the surface. This rock is 
in some places too hard to pierce, with the native 
devices, but American drilling tools cut it readily. 
In other places the so-called rock is only soft 
sandstone. These oil lands are ordinarily un- 
claimed and belong to the government. Where 
they are owned by some one who holds one of 
the old Spanish land grants they can usually be 
bought at a low figure. 



the office of the company and draw his check. 
The intervening time is employed in checking 
the runs in order that there may be no mistakes. 
The system is surrounded with safeguards, the 
run sheet having to go through several hands be- 
fore the check is finally paid. Producers often 
cuss and damn the Standard, but so far as known 
there has never been a serious controversy over 
the running of oil. 



Rules for Buying Crude 
Petroleum 



According to the rules of the Prairie Oil and 
Gas Company (Standard), governing the pur- 
chase of oil from producers in the Kansas field, 
the oil is not actually sold until the producer 
gives notice of his purpose to sell, and he has sixty 
days to "make up his mind." If the oil is run 
to-day and he does not give notice until next 
month, and in that time the price goes up, he 



J. G. Snow, of Pennsylvania, has found sand 
in California entirely adapted to the manufactcr 
of the finest and best grades of glass. Mr. Sn ' 
intends sinking wells in either the San Joaquin 
or Sacramento valleys until he obtains sufficient 
gas for the manufacture of glass. This will be 
done before the erection of a glass factory is un- 
dertaken. Mr. Snow says that his attention was 
called to the fact that natural gas existed in 
commercial quantities in California by the Pa- 
cific Oil Reporter. 



PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 



NEWS FROM THE FIELD 

Supplied by Our Regular Correspondents— Recent 
Developments in the Great Oil Fields of the West 



COALINGA 



CoAlinga, Cal., Nov. 3,1904. 

This field is taking on a spirit of activity never 
before experienced in its history. Developed prop- 
erty which has been lying idle for one and two 
years is being connected up with the pipe lines 
and is being put in shape for pumping, while 
much undeveloped property is stiffening in prices 
with a few transfers at high figures. The entire 
product of the field is now being marketed at 
prices ranging, for the most part, 20 cents and 
better for fuel oil ; the old P. C. O. scale remain- 
ing in effect for the lighter grades. There is 
some talk of the P. C. O Co. piping part of the 
product of this field to its steel tanks at Kern 
River; this report gaining credance from day to 
day. The production for October has beyond a 
doubt surpassed that of any month heretofore 
since the early days of the excitement. Since the 
Coalinga Oil and Transportation Company be- 
gan to receive oil for transportation to the coast 
through its recently completed pipe line, there is 
an increasing good feeling all along the line. 

The Peerless is pumping its No. 1 well, which 
is producing over 400 barrels daily. The water 
is being shut off from No. 2, which is expected to 
equal if not surpass No. 1 as a producer. The 
Coalinga Oil and Transportation Company is 
taking the product from No. 1 well. No. 3 rig 
is in the course of construction and No. 4 will 
be commenced as soon as the lumber can be 
put on the ground. 

The California Oil Fields Company is build- 
ing a large machine shop on its property, which 
will be equipped with a large lathe and steam 
hammer as well as many other appliances which 
will make it an up-to-date machine shop. 

The No. 1 well of the M. K. & T Co., on 
section southwest 8, 20-15, is doing all that was at 
first reported. She is conservatively claimed to 
be a 600 barrel producer. She has made several 
nice flows. This well is the deepest in the Co- 
alinga field, having been finished up at 2700 feet. 
Over three years has been spent in drilling this 
well. 

Pete Garn is here from Los Angeles for a few 
days in the interests of the National Supply 
Company, with which he is connected. 

Mr. Porter has resigned his position as super- 
intendent of the Main State Oil Company. He 
takes charge of the machine shop of R. H. Her- 
ron Company. 

W. M. Graham, general manager of the Cali- 
fornia Limited, has gone to the Indian Territory 
on a business trip. Mr. Graham and associates 
have valuable property in the Territory. 

The Commercial has made a three-year con- 
tract with the Associated at nineteen cents, as re- 
ported last week. The same terms have been 
offered to other west end producers, but so far 
as we can learn no other contracts have been 
made. 

The Limited has a great well in No. .19, sec- 
tion 27. In the first 24 hours it produced 2,300 
barrels, and its average production is close to 
1,200 barrels a day of 24 gravity oil. A pipe 
line to connect this well with Ora is now under 



way. The company is building a rig for No. 23, 
on the same section. 

The California Oil Filds, Limited, has laid a 
four-inch line from well No. 4 on section 21 to 
connect with its line to the loading station at 
Ora: It is worthy of note- that this is the first 
well from which the Limited will have to pump 
to Ora. All the other wells of this company 
are so situated that the oil gravitates to the rail- 
road. 

An unconfirmed rumor says work will shortly 
be resumed on the Call. 

The Tavern is rigging up for No. 2. 

No. 12, of the 28 Oil Company, though sur- 
rounded by big wells, has so far proven a compar- 
atively small producer, pumping about 150 barrels 
a day. The drillers have begun work on No. 
13. The company is erecting a new office and 
camp buildings. 

The Sour Dough has two new rigs under con- 
struction, and has also built two storage tanks, 
each having a capacity of 1,250 barrels. 

On the Westmoreland-Coalinga, Superintend- 
ent Kerr is rigging up preparations to spudding 
in No. 3. 

Work has been resumed on the R. C. Baker- 
St. Paul lease and the drillers will spud in with- 
in a few days. 

W. P. Kerr will form a company to develop 
his recently acqquired property, the east half of 
the northwest quarter of the northwest quarter 
of section 34, 19-65. 

The Big Shell Oil Company has purchased 
from Herring Bros;, the contractors, the rig used 
in drilling their well to its present depth of 1,200 
feet, and will resume work, being now able to 
obtain sufficient water, for want of which opera- 
tions were suspended some weeks ago. 

A residence is being built on the property of 
the Guthrey Oil Company for H. B. Guthrey, 
who has removed 'to this field. A 1,250 barrel 
tank has been set up for the storage. 

The Webfoot Oil Company has struck a strong 
flow of gas in its well in the Cuyam;^ district. 
The strike was made at a depth of about 1,400 
feet. The reports say that the' gas is so- strong 
as to cause much difficulty to drillers in their 
. 

The company is going on with its work and 
has just laid in a new supply of drivepipe and 
other material for strengthening the rigs. The 
owners of the property keep their movements 
clothed in much secrecy but it is positively known 
that they have found the best indications of oil. 

The Webfoot property is about ten miles from 
the spot where Dr. Newbury recently reported 
having found several large outcroppings of oil 
sand. The land is near where Bakersfield people 
have taken up locations. 



SANTA MARIA 



Santa Maria, Nov. 3, 1904. 
There is still considerable talk regarding an in- 
dependent pipe line to tidewater, and it is now an 
assured fact that before the new year something 
definite will be under way, it is learned from 
very good authority that a syndicate backed by 
northern capital is willing at any time to' enter 



this field, put the necessary steamers" on the water, 
and if necessary build the pipe line and purchase 
the oil, but their preference is to only handle the 
transportation end. 

This would necessitate the different companies 
going into the market to see theirTu's SHR 
going into the market to sell their oil and unless 
a combination of the producers could be affected, 
it would mean that they "would cut their own 
throats" in regard to prices, for as sure as fate 
small companies that would need the ready cash 
would be bound to start a campaign of price 
cutting. 

' The field is daily demonstrating that it is des- 
tined to be the greatest field in California if not 
in the United States. The Graciosa Oil Com- 
pany well No. 3 was finished during the week 
and started off at 816 barrels the first 24 hours, 
and the prospects are that it will continue at 
this figure as their No. 2, just adjoining this well, 
started off about eight months ago at 396 barrels 
and is now doing about 430 barrels. 

On the other side of the range of hills the 
Kaiser well is still drilling at a depth of 2,150 
feet. This well was put on the pump at 2,016 
feet and pumped about 75 barrels a day. After 
pumping some thirty days they decided to drill 
deeper and at a depth of 2,090 feet the well 
commenced to flow and it is stated it flowed about 
1,000 'barrels of oil in less than an hour. Oil 
was shot up about 100 feet higher than the der- 
rick and the country for 100 yards on all sides 
was literally covered with oil. This well, with 
the aid of a hole full of water, is now being deep- 
ened still farther, and it will without a doubt 
prove a wonderful well when finished. 

The Pinal Oil Company has shipped very little 
oil lately, but expect to commence again within 
the next week. Their product is contracted to 
the Standard Oil Company and is shipped to 
Port Harford, but as the Standard tanks at that 
point are at present being repaired, they are re- 
ceiving no oil. 

Very little new work has been started in the 
field lately. The Pennsylvania Petroleum Com- 
pany being the only new company to start opera- 
tions. This company is composed entirely of 
Santa Barbara and Santa Maria people and has 
a very large acreage with excellent prospects. 

Mr. Max Grossmayer, of the Radium Oil 
Company, has been in San Francisco for the past 
week. 

Mr. W. M. Graham, of the California Lim- 
ited, of Coalinga, was a business visitor in Santa 
Maria during the week. 



KERN 



Bakersfield, Cal., Nov. 3, 1904. 
The meeting of the independent producers, 
held in this city on Wednesday, is reported to 
have been one of the most important yet held, 
and from what information can be gathered, the 
proposed association is going to be a great deal 
stronger than the public in general think, 
some companies that are generally supposed not 
to be in favor of the movement, or that is not 
to the extent of going into the association, or 
least it has been reported that they would not 
be members, yet one of the large producers and 
a member of the association confidentially said 
that "this asociation is going to surprise a lot of 
these big buyers by its extent and the amount of 
production controlled by them when the final 
deals have been finished and they are ready for 
business." 

It seems to be impossible to get any exact in- 
formation out of the close-mouthed independent, 
producers as to the ways and means to be used in 



PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 



forming the association, even the most talkative 

of them have either from 

• to keep quiet or are n their 

1 1 we are to believe the signs, the i 
ation of independent producers will control prac- 
tidily all of the production of the Kern River 
field, outside of the Associated Oil Co. and those 
having time contracts with the Stan- 
dard I 

Work of the P. v.'. ( >. Co. continues with un- 
diminished vigor; it evident!) has no inten- 
ding work On its storage reservoirs. 

the storage at present ahead of the demand will 
run dose to 1,500,000 barrels, which will take 
all the oil produced in the Kern River lichl. less 
the amount shipped by rail, for some time to 
come. 

The Peerless Oil Co, has commenced work 

•>n well No. 38 recently. This company has just 
perforated well No. 31 which has been flowing 
ever since, which disproves the statement fre- 
quently made that the days of flowing wells in 
the Kern River field had passed. 

The Petroleum Development Co. is building 
two new rigs on its property, which shows its 



not think the present production equal to 

the demands made up 

new 

lently the uthgrri 

riot furnish them 

with an over-abundance of oil, else why the 

reason for increasing the production on their 

own property? 

Imperial and Thirt) Three companies are 
hauling lumber for new rigs, which shows the 
oil given to the railroads by these companies does 
not provide much of an overproduction in the 
motive department of the railroads. 

The McKittrick producers still have some 
chance of having an independent pipe line from 
McKittrick to the coast, if am dependence can 
he placed in the numerous newspaper reports of 
the proposed pipe line, and from the sources 
given as furnishing the information, the men 
who made the statement are surely in a position 
to know what they are talking about. 

Some talk has been raised about the P. C. O. 
Co. pumping oil from its steel tanks in the Kern 
River field. This could hardly be taken as any 
indication that it had to draw on their storage 
in this field to furnish oil for its contracts. On 



the other hand, it wo 

making prep 

Coalinga oil in this hVI, m d n lievi i ,. 

1 .it the 

Coalinga oil cannot b , reser- 

voirs, which are oil f 

Kern River. Would u i„ 
the P. CO < '■ tp pump the Kern R 
it has at present time in its steel tanks in; 
or several of its ear t hern and pump 

il from Coalinga into tanks, 

at present in this field J This would he much 
le^ expensive than removing the steel tanks to 
Coalinga, and then filling them with oil from the 
Coalinga field. This looks In us like a much 
more reasonable way of explaining this act than 
that the company had to draw on their surplus 
for contracts. 



J. A. Waltman, now superintendent of the 
Sunset Diamond, reports that an excellent well 
has been struck on the Adeline property near his 
place. The depth is now some 700 feet, the first 
oil sand having been struck at a depth of 662 
feet. The well is now flowing 250 barrels a day 
through the casing. This is the first well to be 
completed on the Adeline property and demon- 



; 



STOCK OVER-SUBSCRIBED 



It is seldom nowadays that stock, especially of an oil company, is over- 
subscribed. Yet such was the case of OUR NEXT DIVIDEND 
PAYER, THE AMERICAN DUCHESS OIL COMPANY. 

Thev recently required $5,000 to complete certain work and offered 
100,000 shares at five cents per share. The stock was largely over-sub- 
scribed. To fill orders and to push work on other wells, the Duchess 
Company set aside 50,000 shares more at the same price and notified us 
that the shares were subject to advance or withdrawal without notice. The 
well is now in oil-bearing formation with tremendous gas pressure. As 
soon as the well is brought in stock will advance several hundred per cent., 
possibly to par. 

LAND HOLDINGS. 
The company controls over 700 acres under lease, obtained before 
much development work was done in the field. They have the best land 
obtainable at the lowest royalty. Four other companies operating on its 
leases pay a royalty for the privilege. The land, 2% miles from the ocean, 
elevation at 800 feet; affords gravity pipe line and steamer transportation 
to refineries on San Francisco Bay, less than 40 miles distant. This field 
can never be tied up by excessive or arbitrary railroad rates. 

HIGH GRADE OIL. 
THE HALFMOON BAY OIL FIELD produces the highest grade 
illuminating and refining oil ever found in commercial quantities in this or 
any other country. It is superior to the celebrated Pennsylvania, oil. It is 
of 52 to 55 gravity, sells from $2.50 to $3.00 per barrel. Samples of oil 
from wells sent on request. You may test it and judge for yourself. 

EQUIPMENT. 
The Duchess Company is thoroughly equipped in every detail. Has 
the best drilling plant of the field and several thousand feet of casing. 
Electric light system for all the companies to prevent possible fire from 
escaping gas when night work is carried on. Telephone system that con- 
nects with the main office in San Francisco. Machine shop where all re- 
pair work for all the companies is done, saving much expense and anoying 
delay. 

OFFICERS AND MANAGEMENT. 
The officers and directors include bankers and business men of San 
Francisco. The field superintendent is honest and reliable. Having spent 
twelve years as driller and superintendent, he knows every detail of the 
business. The President of the company is J. E. Kerr, a practical oil man, 
w : ho has personally invested over $5,000 in the company. Four other 
companies recognizing his ability as a business man and manager and his 
practical knowledge of the oil business elected him president of their com- 
panies. Although the business of the several companies is distinct and 
separate, being under one management, it saves a great expense to each 
company. Mr. Kerr backs his faith in the HALFMOON BAY OIL 
FIELD by his cash and has personally invested over $30,000 in the several 
companies. 

REFERENCES. 
Any reputable oil or mining paper published. Any oil well supply 



house in this city. Banks when requested. This paper has reported on 
the property favorably a number of times. Two journalistic pirates run- 
ning alleged "investment papers" in the Eastern States reported unfavor- 
ably. 

DIUDEND PAYERS. 
We have made three. Our own company has paid 19 monthly dividends 
of five cents per share. The shares of our own company started at 20 cents. 
They now sell at $5.00 per share. We then told prospective buyers that 
we believed the shares would earn from 100 to 200 per cent, in two years. 
With the increased price of their shares they have made over 3000 per 
cent. We seldom advertise this fact because people do not believe it. It is, 
however, a fact and our books are open for inspection to any prospective 
buyer. We believe the Duchess Company has far better prospects of getting 
as large or even larger returns than our own company had at the time of 
organization. Another company one year old, has paid dividends of $8 per 
share on the par value of $100. Dividends paid for sale of oil at $2.50 per 
barrel. We can sell twelve shares of that stock at $105 per share, which 
is really a bargain. The well of the Duchess Company is only 200 feet 
from this dividend payer, and is almost finished, now in oil-bearing strata 
with tremendous gas pressure. We look for a good well at any date, hence 
stock is SUBJECT TO ADVANCE OR WITHDRAWAL WITH- 
OUT NOTICE. We believe it will pay dvidends early next year. Every- 
thing about the Duchess Company is first-class. Its books are open to 
stockholders and prospective buyers at all times. They have nothing to 
conceal or evade. Investors cordially invited to inspect property. 

OTHER WELLS. 

The Duchess Company will do everything possible to get additional 
wells before the rainy season sets in early next year. As soon as dividends 
are paid, stock will be withdrawn from the market. A dividend of only 
five cents for the whole of next year is equal to 100 per cent, on money 
invested at the present price of five cents per share. When dividends are 
paid, stock is always above par. Figure for yourself the per cent, profit on 
your investment. Every day we receive large orders by letter, but most of 
them by wire. Reserve your stock by wire, investigate, and if you do not 
want it, do not take it. The company sends reports every month and 
sometimes two or three times per month and gives the exact facts about 
their property, whether favorable or otherwise. Financial reports twice a 
year. You know exactly how jour money is spent. Try a few hundred 
or a few thousand shares, and if it proves as successful as the ,h ires of the 
Debenture Surety Company, you will make a profit that will more than 
equal your losses, even if you have invested in a dozen bad <. 

Our representative operates on the stock exchanges of this city and 
we can promptly execute all orders at the lowest price prevailing on the 
date that the order is received, for all the first class stocks of the Tonopah 
and Goldfield mining companies. 

Printed matter free. Write or wire all orders to 

DEBENTURE SURETY COMPANY (Inc.) 

Rialto Building, San Francisco, Cal. 
Use the Wires. It Pays. 



10 



PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 



strates its value as an oil producer. It is oper- 
ated by Messrs. Barlow and Hill and their as- 
sociates. 

Mr. Waltman also reports'" good progress on 
his own well on the Sunset Diamond, which is 
now down some 800 feet with work continuing. 
In this portion the oil sand is found at a much 
greater depth than on the Adeline and it is not 
expected that a paying well will be had until a 
depth of about 1000 feet is reached. 

After spending large sums to locate the source 
of water, which for many months has been per- 
colating into numerous oil wells fn the Kern River 
district, causing heavy losses to the Santa Fe 
Railroad Company and other corporations, and 
forcing them to abandon over 30 wells in the 
north end of the field, the company has, by a 
simple method, succeeded in tracing the source of 
the water to the well Alma Jr. No. 2, northwest 
of its lease, analine dye being placed in one well 
after another. 

Finally the dye was placed in Alma Jr. No. 
2, and apeared into water percolating into other 
wells, demonstrating that it is the source of the 
trouble. It was then plugged to a depth of 65 
feet. A report of the result was received by the 
officials, being to the effect that water in the 
surrounding wells is gradually lowering. The 
officials are much elated, as there has been a fear 
that the entire north end of the district would 
have to be abandoned, which would have meant 
a loss to the Santa Fe of over $1,000,000, while 
other companies would have suffered correspond- 
ingly. 

Parties in from Sunset report that the amount 
of oil in storage on the west side is at present 
very small. Fifteen thousand barrels at the out- 
side is the estimate givep by an oil man who has 
been over the field. Of this amount about tvvo- 
thiVds is said to be held by the company. 

Walter Cosby, who for several years has been 
connected with the Associated Oil Company in 
an official capacity, has resigned and will enter the 
employ of Chanslor and Canfield in connection 
with some of their independent companies. The 
fact that these gentlemen have just organized a 
new company, the Amalgamated, in the south, 
gives rise to the belief that in all probability Mr. 
Crosby is to be connected with the new corpora- 
tion, but this is in no way confirmed either by 
Mr. Crosby or any one in a position to speak 
with authority and nothing is known as to the 
matter. Before the organization of the Associated 
Mr. Crosby was connected with Chanslor and 
Canfield. 

John T. Wooten, who has been employed at 
the Associated for some years, has been promoted 
to the position vacated by Mr. Crosby. 



KANSAS 



Chan-ute, Kan., Nov. 1.— The activity in the 
oil field has shifted to the Oklamoha and Indian 
Territory country for the time. Cleveland and 
Red Fork, the former in Oklahoma and the lat- 
ter in the Indian Territory are now the mecca 
of all the speculators and leasemen. A month 
ago when people talked of Cleveland and Red 
Fork the speculators met it with an uplift of the 
eye which denoted incredulity, but now the same 
speculator is eating ham sandwiches in the tents 
at the low places and he is glad of the oppor- 
tunity to eat at all. For instance Cleveland is a 
mere spot on the map, a short side track, and yet 
within the past month it has grown from that to 
a town of more than 3,000 folks. Red Fork is 
having the same experience. There are more than 
a hundred drilling rigs running in the two 



Flow o* Natural Gas 
Increased by . . . 

Cooper's Gas Lift 

Also flow of water 
or oil increased and 
gas saved 

A. S. COOPER, C.E., 

219 Crocker Building 
San Francisco, Cal, 



AT A BARGAIN. 
Standard Drilling Rig with full equipment of 
small tools. Boiler and engine in first-class con- 
dition. Address Exchange No. 21, care this 
journal. 



The 

Madero 

Rancho 

Consisting of 1 6o acres in Monterey 
county, 25 miles from tide water, 7 
miles from Kings City. 

Excellent Indications of Valuable 

Oil Deposits 

Timber on the property for fuel pur- 
poses. Good water supply. En- 
dorsed by principal experts in the 
country as valuable oil land. Must 
be sold at once. Title in fee simple. 
MRS. G. G. MADERO, 
Room 32, 318 Pine St., San Francisco. 



WANTED — Position as Superintendent of an 
oil company. Thirty years' experience in 
Pennsylvania, Ohio and California. Best of 
reference. Address, 

"PETROLEUM," care this paper. 



We Promote, Finance and Incorporate 

Let us show you the advantages of incorporating your business or enterprise. 
If you need money to enlarge your business, permit us to secure it for you, by selling 
stock through our Eastern correspondents. 

CONSOLIDATED AUDITING COMPANY 

307 to 310 Mills Building, San Francisco. 
Telephone Bush 849. 

WRITE US TO-DAY ! 
If you want to invest your money in a sound business proposition where you are sure 
to receive ten dollars for every one dollar invested 

BUY BUFFALO-CALIFORNIA OIL STOCK. 
This company is incorporated under a special act of Congress providing for the incor- 
poration of companies in the District of Columbia, making our stock absolutely non-assessable 
and non-taxable. We hold some of the most valuable oil property in the well known 

HALFMOON BAY DISTRICT, 
San Mateo County, California, 
Now possessing many fine oil wells producing 52 to 55° gravity oil. But we cannot tell it all 
here. Write us for full particulars. 

BUFFALO-CALIFORNIA OIL CO., 

Fletcher Block, 

Livermore, California. 



C. V. Hall Iron Works 

(LOCATION, OLINDA, ORANGE CO., CAL.) 

POSTOFFICB ADDRESS, Route No. 2, 
FULLERTON. CAL. 

Los Angeles Office, 222 Wilcox Building, 
LOS "NGELES, CAL. 

The C. V. H. Chain Tongs can be had through 
any dealer in oil well supplies. 

These tongs are made of the very best steel, 
in any size, and always give satisfaction. 

Manufacturers or users of chain tongs do so 
at their own risk, in any infringements of 
Patent No. 438,177, the ownership of 
which belongs to the undersigned. 

CHARLES VICTOR HALL. 




[y ^l?J\ |y 






PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 






• v ian twcn:, nil are running thrrc 

il in the townsite 

nun tin- n->t nt them. There are from 

.'•.nit- hi these. The 

Standard has iradc Rrd Fork the Southern tcr- 

• pipe line tn Kansas City and so 
the product nt tin- wells there has no trouble in be- 

• :. 1'Ik- formation in tin- Red 
practical!; tin- same as in the 

1. The) get two nil sands there, 
however, one at bO < feet, and another at 
feet. The nil is found in the shales just as in 
is, hut it is (it much bighei grade, running 
as high as 36j.j gravit) and bringing the top 
price in the market next to the ver\ light parafline 
oil at Muskogee. Then too, the product of the 
Territory and Oklahoma wells is twice as large 
as the product ot the Kansas wells. It is quite 
the usual thing tor them to get a 50-barrel well, 
after it settles down, in the new districts, where- 
as the 50-barrel wells in Kansas are like pickled 
hens' teeth. Wells pay for themselves down 
there in from two to three weeks. 

The drillers are all going south for the reason 
that the hoom there has raised the price of drill- 
ing from S^ cents a foot to more than a dollar a 
foot and in Some places the lessees are paying as 
high as $1.75 a foot. The increased depth of the. 
wells makes drilling an easier task than in this 
section. They finish up with larger holes, too, 
and this decreases the chance of loss in fishing 
jobs and the like. 

Refineries are being constructed at Red Fork, 
Muskogee and they are talking of another at 
Cleveland: These are all independent of the 
Standard Oil Company, and all start with a ca- 
pacity of more than 490 barrels per day. 

One thing which has heretofore stood in the 
ua\ of the rapid development of the new district 
has been the restrictions which the government 
imposed on the leases requiring a cash guarantee 
of the ability of the lessee to drill the property 
of at least $5,000 per quarter section of 160 acres. 
But the men with the money are going in and 
they are able to drill and are doing it. Guffey 
and Galey are the holders of leases aggregating 
thousands and thousands of acres and are drilling 
them just as fast as possible. 

All the supply houses are putting in stores at 
the two places ami repair shops have already be- 
gun to spring up. The new shop at Cleveland 
will employ 20 men and the one at Red Fork 
will be the same size. 

Both the districts are rilling up with the usual 
amount and number of grafters and "sure thing" 
people from all over the country. Red Fork, be- 
ing under the government control, is to the good 
on one thing and that is that prohibition law and 
the gambling laws are strictly enforced by the 
government authorities, while the Oklahoma 
laws permit. Drinking and gambling is going 
on anyway in leases and everything else accord- 
ing to reports. 



FOR SALE. 



1 shares Pinal Oil stock ai share, 

res Brpokshire Oil stock at $1.00 per 
share. 

\V. I. BARNARD, 

lenth Street. Oakland, California. 



We manufacture the best 
lubricating oils for oil 
drillers 

KING KEYSTONE OIL CO., 
204 Front St., San Francisco. 



BARGAIN 

Complete Oil Rig for Sale 

Including two String Toole 
and Fishing Tools 

Over 8000 leet of catting In good condi- 
tion—some never used— sizes, ll/x, 
9; s ; 8 inch and 8 inch drive pipe 

The Above Property 
Cost Over $10,000 

and is for sale at a bargain 

Exchange No. 22 

Care this Publication 



the: 
KROHN 

WIRE ROPE SOCKET 

THE ONLY SOCKET USING A BALL CLUTCH 



LASTING QUALITIES UNEQUALLED 



PATENT 



CLUTCH 




DEVICE 



Fop Sale by ALL 

OIL WELL SUPPLY HOUSES 



LLEWELLYN IRON WORKS 

SOLE MANUFACTURERS 

LOS ANGELES, CAL. 

Write for Circular 




O I L 

WELL 

SUPPLIES 
EXCLUSIVELY 



AH Fully Equipped We Have 



^ THE LARGEST STOCK "** 



ON THE 



PACIFIC COAST 



5 



R. H. HERRON CO. ffffiSftftJ STORES 



PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 



Experts ai\d Experts 



Folly assumes various shapes and disguises; 
to the professional man the most objectionable is 
that masquerade of his own technical knowledge 
which disports itself under the guise of pseudo- 
scientific reports prepared by men who are an 
intimate mixture of the ignoramus and the char- 
latan. In this issue a correspondent, writing 
over the signature of "Engineer," quotes a glar- 
ing example of such practices and raises his voice 
in protest against the stulification of his own 
profession. We sympathize with him, but we 
hold out no immediate prospect of that happy 
day when the community will possess a touch- 
stone by which it can determine without pread- 
venture who is, and who is not, the real thing in 
the way of mining engineer. The only fit judges 
are the members of the profession to which the 
man claims to belong, and the only practical man- 
ner in which the layman can ascertain the status 
of the supposed engineer upon whose advice he 
expects to spend money, is to ask those who are 
informed concerning the technical requqirements 
of the case. 

Certainly, the farcical statements of such a re- 
port as our correspondent quotes would be more 
humorous if they were not unfortunately taken 
as gospel by the people of small means, whom they 
are intended to beguile. It should be unneces- 
sary to inform our readers that membership in 
any institute carries with it no diploma of re- 
liability; our American Institute of Mining 
Engineering expressly avoids giving any such as- 
surance, and is open to all who, engaged in min- 
ing or metallurgy, are nominated by three mem- 
bers. It is an 'association for the publication of 
technical information and cannot, from the very 
breadth of its foundation, undertake an enquiry 
into the character of each applicant. As to sham- 
geological claptrap, such as is quoted by "Engi- 
neer," one can only state that these "delirious 
trimmings" are so absurb, that people who are 
deceived by them need a guardian. They cer- 
tanly are not subscribers to this Journal, for even 
the non-technical reader possessed of the rudi- 
ments of geological knowledge from an occasional 
glance through these columns, would not be de- 
ceived by such balderdash. Much the same can 
be said regarding statements of assay-value, obvi- 
ously based on picked samples, and concerning 
the unwarranted inferences made from neighbor- 
hood to rich mines. In the days of old Rameses 
these stories had paresis. We cannot reach the 
people to whom these varagies of literature ap- 
peal ; our readers are not victimized by them — at 
least we think not ; if they are they de- 
serve the inevitable disaster which awaits them. 
No, Mr. "Engineer," the only way to stop this 
nefarious business is to teach the public that ad- 
vice which costs nothing is worth just what is 
paid for it ; that mining requires skill and experi- 
ence beyond descriptive writing of a loose kind ; 
that every industry has professional men who are 
qualified to serve as professional advisers, and 
are willing to act under the usual business en- 
gagement; that other advisers are a snare and a 
delusion ; and finally, to urge the Post Office de- 
partment of the national government to keep up 
its successful efforts to prevent the misuse of the 
mails for fraudulent purposes. In the meantime, 
Mr. "Engineer," we will join with you in em- 
phasizing the fact that any investor who cares to 
take the trouble, can get at the value of such rig- 
marole as that of the report you quote by asking 
some reputable mining engineer, and if he has no 
such gentleman in his acquaintance, he had better 
hasten to secure an introduction for his own sake 
and that of his friends. — Mining and Engineering 
Review. 



FRESNO COUNTY ABSTRACT COMPANY 

Incorporated Under the Laws of California January 21, 1901. 

Capital Stock $100,000.00 

FULLY PAID UP 

SEARCHERS OF RE CORDS AND CONVEYANCE 

Abstracts of Title Caref ully Compil ed at Reasonable Rates. 

NO. 1115 K ST., FRESNO, CAL. 



BARGAINS 

IN 

Secondhand Boilers and Engines 

Also Oil Well Casing, all sizes 

All in First-Class Condition 
Address 

H. H. R. Care this Paper 



Real Estate 
Insurance 



Oil Lands 

N. L. PALMER 

NOTARY PUBLIC 
COALINGA, - - = - CAL 



ALWAYS FIRST: 



Ever had trouble in getting the size 
of casing or drive pipe you needed? 



TRY USi 



We can help you. We carry ALL the regular 
i sizes and the following specials: 

13 y 2 inch Boston " Diamond B" Casing 42 pounds 



12]^ " 
10 

9 5 /s " 

8X " 

7# " 

6^8 " 

5 s /s " 

VA " 

7 " 
5 

2 

3 



a tt 



" 34 

" 35 

" 3oX 

" 243* 

20 

" 17% 

17 

9 39 

Drive Pipe 2327 

" H.50 

Tubing 4^ 

" sy 2 



Don't you think we can suit you ? 



THE NATIONAL SUPPLY COMPANY 

Los Angeles, San Francisco, Bakersfield, 
NlcKittrick, Coalinga, Santa Maria. 



PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 



v I 

Imperial '.is declan 

shire, 
paxablc Noveml 

nj lia> declared 
nthlj dividend '>r in cents rn-r 

ij Mining Compart 
levied an assessment of I cent 
are upon the capital stock of the company, 
to become delinquent Novcmbei 

The Alta Oil Companj of Oakland has levied 
cents pel share upon 
the capital -t>>ik of the company, tu become 
delinquent November I 1 '. 

Hanford Oil Companj has just disbursed 
a di\ idend at the rate of >-' per share. It amounts 

The Great Northwestern < >il Companj has 
reccntlj been incorporated in Washington with 

a capital stock of $2,0 -ires being voted 

at $1 each. 

The Claremont Oil Companj is now paying 
a dividend of 1 cent per share, or $5,QQQ. 

The Oil Cit) Petroleum Cpmpanj is now 
paying a dividend of > ._, cent per share, or $2,500. 

The Peerless Oil Companj is now paying a 
dividend of 14 cents per share, or £1 4,000. 

The Twenty-eight Oil Companj is now pav- 
ing a dividend of 15 cents per share, or ^0,000. 

At a meeting of the board of directors of the 
East Puente Oil Companj- held October 28th, 
Dividend No. 1 of 10 per cent, of the par value 
of the shares, was declared on all preferred stock 
of the company, payable at the office of the com- 
pany, No. 1314 E street, San Dieiro, California, 
on and after November 1st, 1904. 

At Sour Lake, Texas, the big oil wells on the 
north side are falling off. The two Sims wells, 
which started off at 1200 barrels each, are now 
doing about 1,800 barrels combined. A well was 
reported on the Stephen Jackson property, about 
3,000 feet from the old development, but investi- 
gation proved it to be only a showng of heavy 
oil. This well was reported in the newspapers 
as a 300-barrel producer. The field is making 
from 13,000 to 15,000 barrels. Prices range 
from 25 to 26 cents and 37 and 38 cents on con- 
tracts. The quotation is 35 cents. At Batson 
things have reached a point where the well that 
will make 150 barrels a day is considered above 
the average. The field is credited with 12,000 
barrels a day. The quoted price is 33 cents, with 
some sales at 33% cents. 

In Alameda county the first oiling of roads be- 
gan in 1902, according to the report of the State 
Department of Highways, and there are now 
about 150 miles of oiled roadway. Various meth- 
ods have been employed in applying the oil. On 
clay soil the road was first plowed and crowned, 
after which heated oil was sprinkled at the rate 
of 400 barrels per mile. On roads having a hard 
macadam surface the application of 175 berrels of 
oil to the mile was followed by a half-inch coat- 
ing of river sand. A second application of oil has 
usually been made the following year. The street 
railways are utilizing oil for their roadbeds, the 
Key Route having applied oil on the entire length 
of its track from the pier to Berkeley, a second ap- 
plication having made the roadbed practically 
dustless. 



DIVIDEND NOTICE. 
The Debenture Surety Companj will paj its 
regular monthly dividend (No. 19) of five cents 
per share on November 5th, 1904, at the office of 
the company, 324 Rialto Bldg., San Francisco, 
Cal. J. E. Kerr. 

Manager. 



WESTERN COOPERAGE CO. 

MANUFACTURERS OP 

STAVES and HEADING 

For Both Tlftht nnd Slack Work. 
OUR SPECIALTIES ARE 

Wdile Spruce Saves and Heading Fir Tight Barrel Staves and 

all ready to set up lor Fish, Heading lor Oil, Lard, Pork, 

Pickles or Lard packages ot ; Bee( r lc [tc 

any size. ' "ooo 

Fir Slack Barrel Staves and Heading lor Asphalt, Lime 
Cement and Bottle Barrels. 



Prompt and Courteous Attention to alt Inquiries, 



MILLS at Aberdeen, Wash, and Houltoo. Ore. 



SMITH, EMERY & CO. 

CHEMICAL ENGINEERS 
TECHNICAL. OIL. WORK 



ANALYSIS OF 

Petroleum, Soluble Suits, 
Asphalt, Coal, Coke. 

Residues, Feed Waters, 

Sulphur, Drinking Waters, 

Gypsum, Minerals, Etc. 



Umpire Work on OH Contracts. 
Chemical and Physical Laboratories. 



83-85 New Montgomery Street 
SAN FRJtXCISCO, CJiL. 



Lacy Manufacturing Company 



Manufacturers of 




Steel Water Pipe 
General Sheet 
Iron Works 
Oil Well Casing 
Oil Stills 

OIL STORAGE AND WAGON TANKS 

Works: Cor. New Main and Date streets, P. O. Box 231, Station C. 

Baker Block Telephone Main 196 

Office, 334 North Main Street, Los Angeles, Cal. 

BATES' 

PATENT CASING TONGS 




1416-1426 19th St., Bakersfield, Cal. 



Fills a long-felt want. No more need of 
pole and rope for screwing up casing. Bates 
Tongs can be applied to the casing anywhere 
in driving or pulling without danger of injury 
or parting casing. 

Set No. i, with any two size jaws from gVn 
to 13^ Inches. 

Set No. 2, with any two size jaws froii 4 to 
g$i inches. 










H 



PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 



CALIFORNIA STOCK AND OIL EX- 
CHANGE. 



The following were stock sales in the Cali- 
fornia Stock and Oil Exchange in the formal 
session held for the week ending Wednesday, 
November 2nd : 

Associated Stock — 

22,923 shares at '•£ 

100 share; at 

Caribou — 

100 shares at 

450 shares at 

Claremont — 

2,000 shares at . 

Four Oil — 

300 shares at 

Giant — 



.26 

5.00 
5.50 



25 shares at 
Home — 

600 shares at 
100 shares at 
125 shares at 
500 shares at 
100 shares at 
900 shares at 



.80 
.56 
.20 



.65 

.75 

.80 

.85 

.87i/» 

.90 



300 shares at 92y 3 

200 shares at . • 9; > 

Independence — 

15,000 shares at -° 

Junction — 

1 , 1 00 shares at 



3J50 shares at ; 

200 shares at 

Monte Cristo — 

1 ,000 shares at 

Superior — 

47 shares at 

Twenty-Eight — 

300 shares at 



12 
15 
16 

.70 

.06 

0.00 



Wolverine — 

700 shares at 4-2 



Following are the latest quotations for stocks 
of oil companies listed on the California Stock 
and Oil Exchange: 



Bid. 
.60 
.40 
.25 
.65 
.19 



Alma 

Apollo 

Ass. Oil Co. Stk. Tr. Cer 

Aztec 

California-Standard 

Caribou 

Chicago Crude 

Claremont 

Esperanza 

Fauna ..... 

Four 

Giant 

Hanford 

Home 

Imperial 

Independence 

Junction 

Kern 

Kern (New) 

Kern River . .- 14.00 

McKittrick 

Monarch of Arizona .... 

Monte Cristo 

Nevada County 

Occidental of W. Va 03 

Oil City Petroleum .55 

Peerless 

Pittsburg .07 

Reed Crude 1 . 80 

S. F. & McKittrick 

Senator 

Sovereign .30 

Sterling 2.00 

Superior 

Thirty-Three 

Toltec 20 

Twenty-Eight . 10.00 

United Petroleum 

West Shore 

Wolverine .40 



Asked. 
1.00 



7.00 



.20 
.75 
.80 

.56 
.22 

.66 

.31 
.14 

4.75 



.10 
.30 
.66 



.50 
.20 



185.00 

.74 

17.00 

.15 

.30 



.32 
.70 
.50 
.04 
.58 
13.00 



3.00 

.80 
.33 

2.25 
.05 

7.00 



101.00 

2.25 

.45 



THE 

PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 

is the only 

OIL JOURNAL 

Published on the 

Pacific Coast. 

It gives full, fresh and authentic oil news from 
all the oil districts, new and old. It exposes 
fraudulent oil companies. It gives the latest 
information on oil stocks and dividends. It 
describes the latest method of drilling wells, 
pumping, piping and storing oil; use of oil for 
road making, etc. 

It is the only paper which advocates the belief 
that California's refined asphalt is the equal 
• of Trinidad asphalt for paving and other pur- 
poses, and is in every way superior to bitumi- 
nous rock, the use of which has given San 
Francisco, Oakland and other California cities 
so many poor streets. 

The subscription price is $2.50 a year. If you 
are interested in any way in California oil, cut 
out the following coupon, fill in the blank lines, 
and send it, accompanied by check, money 
or express order to the 

PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 

318 Pine St. San Francisco 



Subscription Blank 



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6 Months 1.50 
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Pacific Oil Reporter 

318 Pine Street San Francisco. 



Please entep my subscription to the PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 



»or- 



Sigoed- 



Address- 



Date- 



PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 



Priute looms 



Phone Main 5966 



Jules Wlttmann 



Jules' Restaurant 



H-, 



Regular Dinner with wine, 75c. 
Sundays and Holidays. $1.00. 



315 317-314-321-323 

Pile St.. S F. 



Open Erenings 

Music Sundays 



•••Will ••• 

Livery, Feed and Sale Stable 

H. C. KERR, Proprietor 

FIRST=CLASS TURNOUTS 

New Rigs of All Kinds 
At Regular Union Rates 




W. D. I. HOWARD, M. 

Consulting engineer and 

Expert on Oil Combustion 

Official Inspector of Oi! Burning Instal- 
lations on Strnru Vessels as author- 
ised by the United State* 
Treasury Department. 

Mills Building, San Francisco, Cal. 



Coalinga 



California 



PROMOTERS 

Do you desire to sell stock in your gold, copper, 
mining, oil and other industrial companies ? If so, 
you cannot find a better advertising medium than 

The Dixie Manufacturer 

Birmingham, Alabama. 

It is the leading industrial and fiuadci.l paper published in the South. 
It reaches that class of readers who are Interested in Finaneial and 
Industrial Atfairs. lis readeas are those who have money for invest- 
ment and answer advertisements. Some of the larges 1 companies in the 
United States have advertised in its columns and found it profitable. 
Why not you ? 

The Dixie Manufacturer is published s«ni-monthly. It is old and 
established. GUARANTEED CIRCULATION 10,000. Subscrip- 
tion price $2.00 per year Advertising rates 10 cents per agate line, 14 
lines to the inch, per issue. Try an ad. Send for Sample copy. Address 

Rountree Publishing Co. 

Birmingham, Alabama. 



WHEELER A WILSON MT1 CO. 

231 Sutter Street 

San Francisco 

Headquarters Iror the 
Pacific Coast 



PATENT S — Unlted States and 

— «■— ^^^— Foreign. Trade 



Marks Registered. J. M. NESB1T, 
Attorney, 921 Park Building, 
Pittsburg, Pa. 



The Pacific Underwriting 
and Trust Company. 

Home office, Parrott Building, 
San Francisco, Cal. 

If Capital is desired for the pro- 
motion of any legitimate proposi- 
tion, Mining, Manufacturing, Irri- 
gation, Mercantile, Patents or 
Railroads, we can assist you. 

Companies incorporated un- 
der any State Laws desired. 

Stocks and Bonds under- 
written. 

Gold Bonds, Interest from two 
to four per cent, foV sale. 

Address all communications to 
the Company at its Home Office. 



DODnDnrDnnnQanuQaaoannunnDnnnnnDncnnnnQ-innnaQDnnnnnnn 



ANNOUNCEMENT 

NEW TYPEWRITERS 

RENTED and SOLD 

L. & M. Alexander & Co. 

110 Montgomery St., 6. F. 



t&~ Ask for New Booklet; "The New 
Smith Visible Typewriter." 



L. C. 




nnnnnnDnnnnnnnurjaannnaDQannDnnannnnDnDnDnnnnnnnnnnnnn 



Paul W. Pnitzman 



113 New Montgomery St, 



ANALYSIS AND REFINING 
TESTS OF PETROLEUM 
ANALYSIS OF ASPHALT & 
FAT & LUBRICATING OILS 



Tel. Mint 279 1 San Francisco 

A. ZELLERBACfl & SONS 

THE PAPER H0U8E. 

4 l6, 418, 420, 422, 424, 426 

Sansome St., San Francisco 

Paper and Paper Bags, Twine 
and Supplies of every description 
Incidental to the trade. 



We carry the LAraen Stock. Oar price, are 
aniuible. 



s LAraen 
Hqo 

Tel. Main, 1188. 



CONTRACT 



WANTED 



Drilling deep wells for 

Oil or Water 
Furnish Complete 

Plants for Drilling 
Prices Reasonable 



PHONE PINE »L. 



Good Second hand Rigs 

OH Well Tools 

Oil Well Casing and Pipe 

Engines and Boilers 

Fishing-Tools 

W. E. YOULE «6 Brockhnrst St., Oakland, Cal. 




Warehouse: Third Street, between Franklin and Broadway. 



The Star Drilling Machine 

Cut shows boiler mounted upon frame of machin The Portable R'K which has placed upon a lower plane the expense of operating for oil or gas. 

oroil and gas works. It Is usually advisable to Its ***** range from shallow water wells to a limit of 2825 feet in depth, but it It especially 

ave boiler mounted upon trucks separate. recommended for work under 1500 feet and can handle easily 1000 feet of casing. 

One No. 4 Machine has a record of Thirty-two 800-foot holes in o°e year 

Made In Sizes to Suit Territory. 




Descriptive catalogue ma led ' ree. 



The only machines made that are absolutely without annoying springs. They are airop'e, 
powerful aud efficient, easy to handle at work or on the road. Used in every State and Territi 
and in many foreign countries. 

We also make full line of Drilling and Fishing Tools, Reamers, Sand Pomps, Spuds etc 

STAR DRILLING MACHINE COMPANY 

AKRON. OHIO 

Harron. Rlckard & McCone, Cal. Ag'te, San Francisco 



16 



PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 



UNION OIL TOOL COflPANY 

*+—*++**— » ••• • « • fW— ♦ 



UNION UNDER-REAMER 





iNCORPORATFD 



Manufacturers of 



Up=to=Date Drilling 



AND 



Fishing Tools 

WW Vf V • W1V W W ^t^^^W W V • ■ WW ^^^^^ wwww • vwv 



FORGING AND MACHINE WORK 

FISHING TOOLS, BITS AND JARS A SPECIALTY 

^•"^▼w^"v wwww WWWX?VWWWWWWWWV ^•••W^W V W VV Vvvf 

54T MATEO STREET, 

Los Angeles, Cal. 



Phone Main 1726 
Home Phone 2626 



Union Special Clutch Rig Iron 



We are installing 
oneof the most up= 
to-date 

Oil Well Tool Shops 

— AT— 

ORCUTT, 

And will havesame 
in oper a tfon by 

Seplenber 15, 1904, 

When we will be 
prepared to do all 
kinds of work per- 
taining to the Oil 
Well Tool business 




Our new CLUTCH 
RIG has proven a 
saving of from 15 
to 25 per cent of 
running expense 
of drilling a well, 
considering saving 
of fuel, wear and 
tear on bull ropes 
and time lost in 
putting ropes on 
and off. Both bull 
wheels and calf 
wheel are operated 
from one lever 
placed in the der- 
rick. 



Ask for "Union" Tools 



THEY ARE THE BEST IN THE MARKET 



PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 



Vol. 6. No. 2 



San Francisco, Cal., Saturday. Nov. 12, 1904 



Price Ten Cents 



PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 

Published W«kly. 
The Oil Authority of the Pacific Coast, 
rd by California Petroleum Miners' Ass'n. 



MARIA R. WINN. Proprietor. 

I'M AN. Editor and Manager. 



OFFICE AND EPITORIAt. ROOMS 

318 Pine Street - - San Francisco, California 
Telephone, Bush 176. 



TERMS. 

One Tear 12 50 

Six Months 1 BO 

Three Months 1 00 

Single Copies 10c 

STRICTLY IN ADVANCE. 

Money should be sent by Postal Order. Draft or 
Registered Letter, addressed to Pacific Oil Reporter, 
SIS Pine Street. San Francisco, rooma 81-32-83. Com- 
munications must be accompanied by writer's name 
and address, net necessarily for publication, but as 
a guarantee of good faith. 

Entered In the Postofllce at San Francisco, Cali- 
fornia, as second class matter. 

Latest Quotations 



Following are the latest quotations for Cali- 
fornia crude oil at the wells: 

COALINGA. 

Prices 
Gravity at 60° temperature. per barrel. 

Oil of 22° up to but not including 24° . . . .20 

Oil of 24 up to but not including 25° ... .30 

Oil of 25° up to but not including 26° . . . .35 

Oil of 26° up to but not including 27° . . . .40 

Oil of 27" up to but not including 28° . . . .45 

Oil of 28" up to but not including 29° . . . .50 

Oil of 29 : up to but not including 30° . . . .55 

Fuel Oil 14° or better 12^2 

KERN. 

14° or better ia%c 

EASTERN QUOTATIONS. 

South Neodesha $ -87 

North Neodesha 67 

Bartlesville 87 

Pennsylvania 1 .56 

Tiona 1.71 

Corning 1 .33 

New Castle 1.43 

North Lima 1-05 

South Lima 1-00 

In. liana 1-00 

Corsicana, light 85 

Corsicana, heavy 50 

Kansas, heavy 49 

Bartlesville (I. T.) 90 

Somerset 1-01 

Ragland 60 

IVtmlea (Out.) 1.53 

TEXAS. 

Beaumont 35 

Si hi r Lake 35 

Saratoga 35 

Batson 33 

SANTA MARIA. 

Gravity at 60° Price per Barrel 

Temperature. at Port Harford. 

i up to but not including 2b" $ .50 

16 up to but not including 27° -" , " 1 



p to but nor includin 
p to but not includin 

p to but not including 70 

p to but not including 31° 75 

31 up to but not including 32° 80 

32 and up 85 



Kerosene, Pearl, per gal., io'-jc; Astral, 
: Star, iq'-jc: Extra Star. 24c; Kocene, 
23c; Elaine, 26c; Water White, in bulk. 
do iso deg., lie; do, extra fine, 15c; Mineral 
Seal, iron hhk, 18c; wooden bbls., 20%c; do, 
cs., 24c; Deodorized Stove Gasoline, in bulk, 
do, in cs., 22%c; 86 deg. Gasoline, in bulk, 
25c; cs., 31c; 83 deg. Naphtha or Benzine, de- 
odorized, in bulk, per gal., 13c; do, in cs., igl{,c. 



After more than three months of strenuous la- 
bor the independent producers of the great Kern 
River fields have effected a combination which 
will be incorporated under the name of the In- 
dependent Oil Producers' Agency, with headquar- 
ters at Bakersfield, Cal. Thirty-five companies, 
most of them operating in the Kern field, are em- 
braced in the organization. It is said that these 
companies represent a monthly capacity of over 
600,000 barrels. Some of the purposes of the 
agency set forth in the preamble to its by-laws 
are: "To secure a stronger and more stable 
market for fuel oil ;" "to lessen the cost of pro- 
ducing, storing, handling, shipping and selling;" 
"to promote the demand and the production," etc. 
We understand that no company in the agency 
will be allowed to make any new contracts for 
its product under any consideration, thus 
effectually putting in its hands practically all the 
product of the field outside that controlled by the 
Associated and P. C. O. Co.'s. There can be 
but one result for such a combination. The small 
producers will receive proportionate benefit with 
the larger ones and at the same time take a petty 
competition out of the market. The surplus will 
be in the hands of an organization that will not 
throw it away at a fraction of its intrisic value ; 
in which event it ceases to become a surplus and 
can he rcconed as . a part of the necessary 
supply and the agency becomes one of the 
States great marketers of oil, enjoying the same 
possibilities as its competitors, putting beyond 
them a part of the product required for daily 
use. In other words the output has been effec- 
tively curtailed just as we have from the first in- 
sisted it should be. The wisers heads among the 
Independents have not been slow in grasping the 
situation and the result is that a wider market 
will be sought to the mutual advantage of all. 
Whether or not the Independent product will be 
finally taken by the large handlers of oil remains 
to be seen. We believe there is a liklihood of this 
being done. We cannot believe that any cutting 
of prices, to the detriment of the producer, will 
occur. On the contrary, we now see no reason 
win delivery prices should not immediately ad- 
vance to a point where money can be made in the 
production of fuel oil. 



competent to hold it with credit to himseil and 
the corporation. M r. Mi 1 

versed in all branches of the oil business an 

efficient work in the organization oi 1 

has shown him to be a man especially fitted for 

the position. He is a prominent citizen of Mon- 
terey. As chairman of the executivt committee 

his time w ill be largely talo n .1 fl 

the organization for sunn- timi The 

em 1 will 11 once proceed to the business 1 
posing of the product of its constituents. 



The attention of our readers is especially 
called to a description of the Starrett Pump, ap- 
pearing on another page of this issue. The in- 
vention of this pump can be regarded as nothing 
short of one of the important mechanical discov- 
eries of the age and its application will doubt- 
less provide for many requirements heretofore 
supposed [insurmountable. Its uses 1n mining 
will doubtless be ably covered by some of our 
many mining contemporaries; we, therefore, will 
simply set forth some of its merits as an oil well 
pump. 

Any experienced oil man well knows the an- 
noyance, expense, and time expended in the fre- 
quent pulling of sucker rods, putting in new 
boxes and renewing worn and broken parts of 
the ordinary oil well pump. Especially is this true 
in California where the oil from two-thirds of 
the wells carries a large percentage of sand. All 
these annoyances are overcome by the Starrett 
pump ; its possibilities being simply covered as 
follows : 

First — No submersion necessary ; well can be 
pumped to the bottom. 

Second — By a simple regulation of the "Shift- 
er" well can be pumped to any desired capacity, 
thus making it possible to pump wells of different 
capacity from the same compressor. 

Third — Absolutely no parts to become broken 
or worn by sand. By superheating compressed 
air wells producing low gravity oil and heretofore 
deemed impossible to pump, can be successfully 
overcome by the Starrett pump. 

Fourth — For pipe lines the Starrett pump will 
provide a long felt need. Less than one-third 
the number of pump stations will be required 
with the additional advantage that the pressure 
on the pipe itself will be decreased more than 
one-half. 

We do not believe that the inventor has nearly 
grasped the importance of his invention but his 
practical tests have proven all these things pos- 
sible. 



Our regret that Timothy Spellacy was not 
elected to the presidency of the Independent Oil 
Producers' Agency is recompenced by the fact 

that the man receiving the office is one thoroughly 



A correspondent informs us that a great deal 
of interest is being taken in the four new Ameri- 
can rigs which have been sent into Roun 
by the Standard's new concern, the Roumano- 
American Petroleum Company. It is undei 
that the rigs have been supplied by the well 
known Oil Well Supply Company., of Pittsburg. 
They will be operated by a corps of skilled work- 
men, and an attempt will no doubt be made to 
set up a record for the expeditious and econom- 
ical drilling "f wells in these oil fields, 



PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 



Natural Gas in California 

j& ;& By A. S. CO OP ER, M. E. j& j& 



VI. 

ANTICLINES., SYNCLINES AND MONOCLINES. 

Anticlines and qua qua versals exert a great 
influence in the accumulation of natural gas, pe- 
troleum oil and water. Especially is this true in 
California, where the dips and undulations of the 
anticlines are generally very steep, whereas in 
the Eastern States they rarely exceed twenty feet 
to a mile. 

When a group of strata is bent into a curve 
like a saddle with its concavity turned towards 
the earth it is called an anticlinal curve. A 
synclinal curve is exactly opposite that of an an- 
ticlinal. When the strata are folded or curved 



under the bottom edges of the qua qua versal or 
anticline. Through the cracks and seams in the 
crown of the fairly impervious dome described 
above, the oil and gas again journeys upwards to 
the next porous strata surmounted by a fairly 
impervious strata. 

When a surface stratum most recently de- 
posited has been bent or faulted into the form of 
an anticline it can be assumed that all the under- 
lying unaltered strata has been similarly bent. 
Therefore anticlinal structure when seen upon 
the surface will continue down to the altered 
rocks and to these depths petroleum oil and gas 
may be obtained. An anticlinal folding may reach 



eject the water. This is owing to capillary at- 
traction. The capillary attraction is sufficient to 
resist the buoyant force of oil in water. 

When oil containing asphaltum enters the pores 
of the rock cover, the voltile parts evaporate 
leaving a viscous, hard or brown friable bitumen 
in the pores, which makes shales or other fine 
grained rocks impervious to the flow of water, 

LEGEJN.D 



ooooo ooaoo oq o o 
OOOOGO oooooo et> 

y&OCroQQI? PQQP° O OP 



CONGLOMERATE 



■SHALE 



••»»*•#[ 



• * m * » * 



SANDSTONE 



8ITL/MIN/2ED5AND 







SERPENTjrVOUS 
M ETTA M ORPHIC 



V-<-V/-7>»- T> 



GKAN/TIC 



L/MESTONE 






ALLUVIAL 



FIG. 13. 



Fie,'. 13 represents a syncline — N being the axis of 
syncline would get water or water with gas 



the same. A well drilled in the center of this 
in solution. 



so as to form a trough with the convex side 
towards the earth, this is called a synclinal curve. 

Free gas will nearly always be found in the 
anticlines, for if any free gas is present owing to 
its inferior gravity as compared to oil or water 
it will float upon these liquids. In some instances 
fissures may occur in synclines through which 
free gas is ascending ; in that case if a well is ad- 
vantageously located free gas will be obtained in 
a syncline. 

Gas in solution with water will be found in 
nearly all the synclines of California. There is 
more liability of there being an artesian flow of 
water in an syncline than an anticline, consequent- 
ly gas in solution with water will be more readily 
and easily obtained in a syncline than an anticline. 

A qua qua versal is a nest or stack of strata 
resembling inverted bowls. 

An anticline is a nest or stack of strata resem- 
bling inverted troughs. 

These structures usually consist of alternating 
beds of porous and impervious rocks. The por- 
ous rocks act as a reservoir for the accumulation 
of free gas and petroleum oil, while the practically 
impervious rocks as an encasement for these res- 
ervoirs. Petroleum oil and natural gas enters a 
formation at the lowest part of the unaltered 
strata. The oil and gas, owing to their buoyancy 
in associated water ascends through porous rocks 
towards the crown of a qua qua versal or apex of 
an anticline and saturates the porous rocks lying 
below the fairly impervious strata. The sur- 
plus water leaks out through fissures and cracks 



a depth of over twenty thousand feet or may be 
but a few hundred feet. 

The cover or encasement of an oil or gas ac- 
cumulation generally consists of a fine grained 
rock such as shale or clay. 

When water has possession of a fine grained 
rock it is difficult for oil to enter the same and 



oil or gas. There are places where the strata 
bituminized in this manner are many hundreds 
of feet thick. 

When the oil contains paraffin it is deposited 
in the rock pores so clogging them ; pipes of 
large diameter are frequently clogged by the de- 
position of paraffin, which has to be removed by 
a go-devil. 

When heavy oils are forced through porous or 
seamed strata, silt and debris become mixed with 
the oil which fills the pores and seams of encasing 
rocks and when it approaches the surface, through 
evaporation, it fills large fissues. 

Oil saturating shale often forms a bituminous 
mud which under pressure caused by a large 




FIG. 14. 

Fig. 14 shows an anticline. A well drilled at D would get nothing but water or water with gas in 
solution. A well drilled at F would in sand I get oil with gas in solution; in sand J water 
with gas in solution; in sand K oil with gas in solution. A well drilled at G would get gas 
and then oil with gas in solution from the sands I, J and K and would get water or water 
with gas in solution from sand L. 



PACIFIC OIL REPOR 



amount of superincumbent 

Imn •iperincumhent strata 

mineral w 
silicitied and calcified, rendering them impcrv ious. 

tn make iniper- 
id has 
Baling ■ deposit 
atter a portion .1. 

The lowes containing bitumens 

may be main thi ielow the surface 

of the earth anil there may be many porous beds 
the other ami being separated by 
fairly impervious arched rocks. In this case the 
oil ami gas which escapes from an accumulation 
below will be caught again by an upper porous 
bed surmounted with a fairly impervious covei 
anil will continue doing this until finally it ap- 
pears on the surface of the earth or is permanently 
arrested by an absolutely impervious cover. 



A New California 
Pipe-Line 



The new pipe-line of the Coalinga Oil Trans- 
portation Company, I 10 miles long, running 
from the Coalinga oil field, in Fresno county, 
over the Coast ranges to tidewater on Monte- 
rey bay, was completed and put into operation a 
few days ago. This is the second longest pipe- 
line on the Pacific Coast, the Standard's pipe line 
from the Kern River field to San Francisco bay 
being 275 miles in length. The new line is an 
important feature in the progress of the Cali- 
fornia oil industry. Through it a large portion 
of the product of the Coalinga field will be 
taken direct to oil carrying vessels at a small, 
but yet undetermined cost, and it should work 
an improvement in the commercial conditions 
of that field. It will transport exclusively the 
oils produced or purchased by this and allied 
companies, controlled by the same interests, 
whose business is the marketing of fuel oil. In 
this the company gains an important competi- 
tive advantage, and anticipates a widening of its 
markets throughout the Pacific region. 

The new line is of 6-inch pipe, and has an es- 
timated capacity, of 12,000 barrels a day. The 
highest point in the line has an altitude of 
2,56fj feet, 22 miles from the initial end, and 
represents a lift of 1,800 feet. So far, but four 
pumping stations have been installed, one in the 
oil field, and the others 15.45 and 81 miles dis- 
tant, respectively. Each station is provided with 
two 16 by 5 by 12 inch pumps, operated by steam 
power from boilers of 240 horsepower. The 
line' is designed to maintain a working pressure 
of 1,000 pounds. It is buried 2 feet under- 
ground throughout its length, and is carried un- 
der the Salinas river in crossing that valley. The 
terminal is in the town of Monterey, and the oil 
is delivered to storage tanks, 100 feet above a 
loading wharf. The line was put into operation 
in four months from the beginning of pipe laying, 
and has cost about $750,000. The same interests 
control the Matson Navigation Company, which 
operates a fleet of steam and sailing oil carriers, 
which have been delivering oil to the Hawaiian 
Islands, Alaska, Puget Sound ports, Portland, 
San Francisco and other points. These interests 
also control the National Oil and Transporta- 
tion Company, which is operating a 40-mile pipe 
line from the Santa Maria oil fields, in Santa 
Barbara county, to the coast at Alcatraz landing. 
The production of the Coalinga field is now es- 
timated at over 16,000 barrels a day, about four- 
fifths of which has a gravity of 22 to 24 degrees 



B., the all output of the light 

ll of the K fields, 

iiandi- 
n this field, .is elsev 

ts per barrel. The Standard ope: 
1 iranch of it-, s.in Joaquin valley pipe 

line, but has recently refused to buj 
than gravity, for which grade it quotes 

nls a barrel. The new line thus opens a 
i lor the heaviest oils, and bringN an im- 
portant new purchaser into the field; hut the ef- 
fect in prices to the produce!, and to fuel oil con- 
sumers on San Francisco baj and elsewhere, re- 
mains to he developed. It is understood that 
this companj is preparing to construct another 
pipe line from the Coalinga district to San Fran- 
cisco bay. 

The oil industry generally exhibits much activ- 
;t\ in the fields of transportation and consumption 
under the stimulus of tin- large supply and low 
prices. The independent producers of the Kern 
River field are seeking a way to secure better and 
more stable prices and markets. The Pacific 
Coast Oil Company, the Standard Oil interest, 
has begun grading for a large extension in its 
big refining plant at Point Richmond, on San 
Francisco bay ; by which the capacity will be 
much enlarged. The improvements will include 
several brick buildings, a shop for repairing oil 
cars, and new storage tanks. 



The Production of Natural 
Gas in 1903 



Never before has the production of natural 
gas in the United States been so great as it was in 
the year 1903. This is the opening statement made 
in Mr. Oliphant's report entitled "The Produc- 
tion of Natural Gas in 1903," which the United 
States Geological Survey has just published. The 
year's product was valued at $35,815,360. This 
is an increase in value of $4,947,497, or 16 per 
cent., as compared with 1902. The increase in 
Pennsylvania and Ohio was especially remark- 
able, amounting respectively to $1,830,651 and 
$2,123,582. The value of the product of West 
Virginia also showed an increase of $1,492,178. 
Four States, namely, Pennsylvania, Indiana, 
West Virginia and Ohio produced 94 per cent, 
of the value of natural gas in 1903. Of these 
States Indiana alone had a decreased production 
in 1903 as compared with 1902. 

The volume of natural gas produced in 1903 
amounted to 238,769,067,000 cubic feet at at- 
mospheric pressure and represented approximately 
5,968,725 tons. If the density should remain the 
same throughout this quantity would fill a res- 
ervoir that was 1.62 miles high and covered a 
square mile of ground, or it would fill a pipe that 
encircled the earth at the equator and that had 
an internal diameter of 49 feet. Its heating 
value would equal that of 11,938,453 tons of bi- 
tuminous coal. 

Natural gas was burned during 1903 by 627,- 
047 domestic consumers and 7222 manufacturers, 
a total of 634,269 persons, firms, and corpora- 
tions that were supplied with light, heat, and 
power. A careful estimate puts the number of 
individuals benefited at not less than 4,500,000. 
A large amount of money was expended in 
1903 in building mains for conveying gas, in 
equipping new compressing stations, and in drill- 
ing gas wells, mainly in Ohio, West Virginia, 
Pennsylvania and Kansas. 

It is interesting to note that the United States 



of iir the wide 

bution of natural gas in I 
illuminating properties and calorific vab.. 
application and economy of the natural gas en 
nine, and the number of companies in the \ 
and the value of the cis consumed in 
A record of well and pipe lines is also added. The 
report, which is published separate!) as an extract 

from the Survey's forthcoming publication, '"Win 
eral Resources of the United States. 1903," may 
lined, fee ..i charge, on application to the 
Director of the United States Geological Survey, 
Washington, I). C. 



The Kansas Oil Fields 



Two years ago the petroleum business in Kan- 
sas was only a prospect, and dubious at that. 
rhe men who were engaged in it hardly knew 
whether there was oil to lie had in the State 
in quantities worth drilling for, and when oil 
was found there was no way to get it to market. 
'Flic persistence of the drillers has developed the 
Kansas field into one of great importance, and 
the extension of pipe lines and erection of re- 
fineries at an expense of millions of dollars by the 
Standard Oil Co. has opened up an outlet for the 
vast stores of mineral wealth that lie hidden be- 
neath Kansas prairies. 

The pipe line runs from the Kansas and In- 
dian Territory fields for October aggregated 
nearly 500,000 barrels. There is little doubt but 
Kansas and Indian Territory can to-day pro- 
duce regularly 25,000 barrels a day. During 
October only about one-third of the production 
has been run from Chautauqua county, owing to 
the lack of pipe line facilities. The first line to 
Chautauqua county was built less than a year 
ago, and was constructed of three-inch pipe. At 
that time it was believed my the Standard a three- 
inch line would be large enough to take care of 
all the oil Chautaukua county would ever pro- 
duce. This spring the Standard found it neces- 
sary to construct an auxiliary four-inch line, and 
last week another four-inch auxiliary line was 
completed. This shows how rapidly the oil busi- 
ness is deevloping in Kansas. Kansas oil men are 
now confident that this is to become the greatest 
oil producing region in the United States, the re- 
gion the Standard will depend upon to supply 
its demands. If this is true, and there is every 
reason now to believe it is, the business has by no 
means seen its best days, and the best money is 
yet to be made. Extensions of roads are con- 
stantly being made, and the production increased. 
Chautauqua county alone is now producing about 
180,000 barrels a month, or nearly one-third of 
the entire amount now being taken by the Stand- 
ard in this region, and the county is not more 
than half drilled over. A new pool is just being 
opened about two miles east of Sedan, which 
promises some fine wells. Much of the land 
has been hurriedly drilled over again some time, 
and good pools will he developed. 

During October forty-five wells have been 
completed in Chautauqua county, of which num- 
hur fourteen are dusters and two gassers. The 
producing wells for the most part have been 
paying producers, none of them "gushers," but 
wells starting out at from thirty to 175 barrels 
In the Scott pool, the most important at 
the present time in the county, situated three 
due south of Peru, several wills have been 
drilled in what started off at 150 to 175 barrels 
a day. 



PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 



The Starrett Pump 



While the system of pumping by compressed 
air is by no means new, it has not hitherto been 
put into general use for the very good reason 
that the conditions necessary for its successful, 
or rather practical, operation are prohibitive in 
the majority of cases. 

The principal condition which limits the use 
of the air lift pump is, that to do effective work 
two-thirds of the air pipe and discharge pipe 
must be submerged. For example, if it is desired 
to pump from a well 100 feet in depth, 66 feet 
of the pipe must be under water in order to lift 
the water the remaining 34 feet to the surface. 




Fig. 1. 



Except in deep artesian wells, this needed con- 
dition is rarely found. 

A great deal of study has been given to the 
subject of compressed air in the endeavor to 
overcome this great difficulty, but so far with 
little success. 

The best known system up to the present time 
is the simple one invented by Dr. Pohle, where- 
by the air is conducted through a pipe into a 
well and turned upward into a water discharge 
pipe, carrying a certain percentage of the water 
with it. But, as stated before, a submergence 



of 66 per cent, is required to do effective work, 
which makes its use very limited. 

Another condition, and one which prevails in 
all systems of pumping, whether by compressed 
air, steam or electricity, is the necessity of carry- 
ing a pressure due to the head, i. e., height of the 
lift. 

It has never been believed possible that this 
latter condition could be overcome, because, if it 
were, it would seem to contradict a physical law, 
nevertheless, that it has been done will be ex- 
plained in the following article. 

This new process of pumping, known as the 
Starrett Pump, owned by The W. G. Leale Co., 
is the invention of Mr. D. W. Starrett of Oak- 
land, California, and can properly be viewed in 
the light of a discovery, for it is by his applica- 
tion of compressed air that water can be elevated 
to a height under a low pressure; in fact the Star- 
rett Pump will lift water or any liquid any 
height under any desired pressure. 

When the full import of this statement is 
comprehended, the great value of this discovery 
will be appreciated and when the process is un- 
derstood it will not appear unreasonable or that 
any law is being violated ; on the contrary it will 
be found very simple and in full accord with 
nature's laws. 

HOW IT IS DONE. 

In this case we will consider the pump cham- 
ber or cylinder submerged ; therefore, it will fill 
by gravity. 

For illustration, we will say we carry a pres- 
sure of air of 20 pounds to the square inch. 

(Forty-three one-hundredths of a pound of 
air pressure will lift one foot of water, but for 
convenience we say in round numbers one-half 
a pound of air pressure will lifi one foot of 
water ; therefore 20 pounds of air pressure will 
lift 40 feet of water.) 

Referring to Fig. 1, 20 pounds of air pressure 
at "a" will force 40 feet (20 pounds) of water 
through the lower check valve "b," and-no more 
water can pass through because the 40 feet (20 
pounds) of water on top of the check valve "b" 
balances the 20 pounds of air pressure on the 
other side of check valve "b," causing an equilib- 
rium. The 20 pounds of air pressure then passes 
through the air jet "c" (the weight of the water 
in the discharge pipe at "c" is lighter than at "b" 
in proportion to the distance between "b" and 
"c") and forces or lifts the 40 feet (20 pounds) 
of water, less than between "b" and "c," to an 
overflow, regardless of the height. The moment 
there is an overflow from the discharge pipe, the 
weight on the check valve "b" is lessened, admit- 
ting the exact amount of water through the check 
valve "b" that will counter-balance the overflow. 
Thus the pump can never overload itself, but the 
flow of water into the discharge pipe will be auto- 
matically regulated by the air pressure carried. 

As will now be clearly seen, the 20 pounds of 
air pressure lifts but 40 feet of water, conse- 
quently, instead of a solid column, there is but 
40 feet of water in the discharge pipe, the lost 
space in the discharge pipe being made up by the 
increased speed from the expansion of the air in 
accordance with the Marriotte law, that the 
speed and expansion of air increases in an in- 
verse ratio to a falling pressure. 

Instead of carrying a heavy load slowly, several 
light loads are carried rapidly, producing the 
same result. 

With a double pump, one having two pump 
chambers or cylinders, the water is made to flow 
in a continuous stream by means of a device 
which automatically turns the air from one cylin- 
der, when empty, into the other, the speed of the 



air being so great that there is no apparent break 
in the discharged column of water. 

ECONOMY., COST OF OPERATION AND MAINTEN- 
ANCE. 

As has been stated, it is the expansion of the 
air in the discharge pipe and its increased speed 
that performs the work in the Starrett Pump 
over and above the balance of power, for in- 
stance : We put a gauge on the air pipe and one 
on the discharge pipe — the gauge on this dis- 
charge pipe will register from 1 to 2 pounds less 
than the gauge on the air pipe, showing almost a 
balanced pressure — and if steam were used in- 
stead of air, no work would be done for the very 
reason that the pressures are so nearly on a bal- 
ance; to do practical work with steam a certain 
amount of pressure above the balance of powei' 
would have to be. added, but with air, the ex- 
pansion and speed perform the work. For this 
reason there is a greater economy with the Star- 
rett system in the high lift than in the low, be- 




cause in the high lift the air has a greater chance 
to expand and more of the power put into it by 
compression is utilized by expansion. 

It is for the same reason, in the use of steam, 
that compound engines are built. 

To make this more clear, suppose we carry an 
air pressure of 30 pounds, how many times will 
the pressure fall before reaching the atmosphere? 
As stated before, the Marriotte law for the ex- 
pansion of gases is, "The speed and expansion 
(or volume) of air increases in an inverse ratio 
to a falling pressure." To find how many times 
the pressure will fall before reaching the atmos- 
phere, add the atmospheric pressure (15 pounds) 
to the pressure carried and divide the sum by the 
atmospheric pressure. 

Say the pressure carried is 30 pounds plus 15, 
the atmospheric pressure, equals 45, divided by 
15 equals 3, the number of times the pressure will 
fall, before reaching the atmosphere, the speed 
and volume increasing three times. 



PACIFIC (MI. REPORTER 



I he ,iir when disch i 

ierr from a receiver through a 
<hort , rt per minute under a pre-.- 

in I to 111 atmospheres (15 to 150 
pounds absolute pressure). To hr .■ 

Mi the ordinary load to lift, the spei 
the air when it enters the pump column i^ 
feet per minute, then, as stated, at 30 pounds, the 
re will fall three times; therefore, the air 




and water will have attained a speed, theoretical- 
ly, of 6,000 feet per minute when leaving the 
discharge pipe. 

In low lifts, the air has not time to expand 
to its full limit before leaving the discharge pipe, 
hence the power still remaining in it escapes into 
the atmosphere, causing a loss in economy, 
whereas in high lifts this loss is to a greater ex- 
tent avoided. In high lifts of, say, 500 or 1,000 
feet, it might be found advantageous to carry 
50 or 75 pounds pressure, because, in a long pipe, 
time enough would be given for the air to more 
nearly reach its limit of expansion, thus utilizing 
the added speed of the higher pressure, e. g. 75 
pounds plus 15, the atmospheric pressure, equals 
90, divided by 15, equals six times that the pres- 
sure would fall or, taking as the initial speed 
2,000 feet, multiplied by 6, equals 12,000 feet 
speed that the air would attain when leaving the 
discharge pipe; these pressures (50 or 75 pounds) 
would be low when it is remembered that in 
other systems of pumping, a 500-foot lift would 
require a pressure approximating 250 pounds and 
a 1,000-foot lift a pressure of 500 pounds. 

It is well known that speed gives power, — the 
electric motor, the turbine water wheel ' and 
countless other machines derive their greatest 
power through being driven at high speed. 

The cost of operating the Starrett Pump is 
very low and is confined almost wholly to the 
expense of motive power. The cost for repairs 
and replacement of worn parts is slight, as it has 
no rings, packing, lining, pistons nor rods ; re- 
quires no lubricating, is not affected by gritty or 
muddy water, and on account of its simplicity, 
takes less skill to operate and maintain than a 
direct-acting pump ; therefore, experienced men 
are not needed. 

The same amount of work can be done with 
about one-third less horse-power than is required 
by direct-acting steam pumps or steam pumps 
driven by compressed air. 

FOR PUMPING OIL WELLS. 

Fig. 2 shows a Starrett Well Pump having 
only one pump chamber or cylinder. 

This is another application of the same prin- 
ciple employed in mine pumping, and is espe- 
cially applicable for wells of small diameter and 
limited capacity, notably oil wells. 

It operates as follows: 



the pump through an ail 
which i- p 

- the liquid from the pump cvlinder inl 

<rgc pipe; the .hi is th( n in this 

pe bj an am. .n ,i -, t bJfter, 

I at the surface, and made to enter the dis 

pipe just above the top .link valve in the 

pump cylinder (through another ail pipe which 

extends inn. the well outside of the discharge 

pipe), and forces the water to the surface. 

The operation of tin' shifter is \cn similar to 
that tor mining pumps, the difference being that it 
can be regulated to shift at am desired interval 
of time instead of upon the emptying of the pump 
chamber. 

A shifter is particularly valuable where a num- 
ber of wells are operated from one power plant: 
a shitter placed over each well can be regulated 
to suit the individual conditions ot that particu- 
lar well, thus practically operating each well inde 
pendently of the others. 

Referring to Figure 3: one of the auxilian 
chambers, either (> or S, must be tilled with liquid 
— water or oil — before starting the pump. 

Suppose, for example, auxiliary chamber () is 
tilled — the air enters the pump through the 
shifter at air inlet 1 ; a small auxiliary air pipe 
13, taps the main air pipe 5, carrying air to aux- 
iliarj chamber 6, through pipe 9, into auxiliary 
chamber 8; the air is then shifted from auxil- 
iary chamber 6, into auxiliary chamber 8, 
through auxiliary air pipe 14, and the operation 
is reversed — the liquid being forced from auxil- 
iary chamber 8, through pipe 9, back into auxil- 
ary chamber 6. 

The time taken to force the liquid from one 
auxiliary chamber into the other is regulated by 



-,--. ;T — ^ 




THE STARRETT MINING PUMP 

valve 10, to give the number of shifts required 
within any specified time. 

The shifter operates as follows: The auxiliary 
chambers. 6 and 8, are but miniatures of pump 
chambers. When the liquid is forced out of 
auxiliary chamber o. an open float settles upon a 



open f a , 

hambci 6, idmiti 

which op, ; 

u the oppo 
.v the piston in the sftiftei to the 
1 be operation liam- 

bei S is emptied. 

I oi oil wells th,- Starreti ( 

Pump is witllOUl a peel. 

Having onlj two valves (the inlet and outlet 
check valves) no rods, no lining, no packing, no 
rings, nothing to be cut out In the sand, i. 
of time as well ag ,„, duct caused 
breakdowns will I and the 

pairs be reduced to a minimum. 

It can he made am size to suit am size casing. 

It Can be operated either submerged oi 
suction pump, theTefore, can he made to pump the 
full capacity of the will. 

• r gives a i ontin : flow . the* bj im rea in 

the output ot oil over present methods of pump- 
ing, at least one-half. 

It is less expensive and nquii 
experience to operate. 

It is positively without a competitor. 

The invention is fully protected by patents 
allowed and pending in the linked States and 
foreign countries. 

A complete pumping plant can be seen in 
operation at the office of W. G. Leale Companj , 
1 1 °-l 2 1 Mission street, San Francisco, California. 



Since the S. S. Ventura left there have been 
but three arrivals of Australian coal from New- 
castle, namely: Brenn, 2,956 tons; Emma Lau- 
rans, 2,817 tons; Lady Doris, 3,000 tons; total, 
8,773 tons. Notwithstanding the apparent lib- 
eral arrivals for October which footed up in all 
23,719 tons, the quantity received in October, 
1903, was more than double than this amount, 
being 47,967 tons. Yet for the moment there is 
a bounteous supply for immediate requirements. 
There are seventeen vessels (eleven enroute) 
which are on the chartered list from Australia 
to this port; they will carry in all about 45,000 
tons. But few names are being added to the en- 
gaged list, as shippers are not prepared to pay the 
present asking rates, the result is, shipments of 
Colonial coal are gradually diminishing. Ship- 
ments from our Coast collieries are comnig for- 
ward freely, and are finding ready sale on arrival. 
Shippers are enabled to put their colliery output 
into this market at a pretty low figure, as car- 
riers are procurable for transporting same at re- 
duced rates. Trade generally in this line is show- 
ing an improvement, as volume of trade at this 
season of the year always enlarges. There is no 
perceptible change in values asked by either the 
wholesale or retail dealers. Fuel oil still holds 
its sway, as a steam producer, the price is low. 
and the demand is large. There appears to be 
next to no limit of the quanity offered for sale. 



Enough Indiana oil well drillers to operate six 
strings of tools have been hired by the Standard 
Oil Co. and sent to Roumania. At first it was 
the intention to hire only married men 
would take their families there, but it w 
difficult to find men of families who rare to 
leave the United States and single men were 
hired. The men receive ^l> per '- their 

expenses from the time they start on th 
and thej contract to remain three years. 
mania is about one-third .■■■ han the S 
Indiana, with a population of about 5," 
more than twice as mam as that State. Buch- 
rhe capital, is a city of some 200,000 in- 
habitants. Agriculture and cattle breedin ; 
the two main occupations, although the salt and 
oil industries are fast becoming prominent fac- 
tors in the life ot the country. 



PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 



NEWS FROM THE FIELD 

Supplied by Our Regular Correspondents—Recent 
Developments in the Great Oil Fields of the "West 



COALINGA 



Coalinga, Cal., Nov. 9. 1904.. . 

The new pipe line of the Coalinga Oil and 
Transportation Company is running 5,000 bar- 
rels of oil daily to its tanks at Monterey. This 
new outlet provides for practically all the com- 
panies heretofore shut in and with the other out- 
lets at hand provides for the entire output of the 
field. Coalinga to-day can be said to be the busiest 
field in the State and perhaps the most prosperous, 
for every barrel of its product is being marketed 
and at a price rarely falling below 20 cents 
per barrel. New work is starting up on every 
side and properties that have for the past two 
years been practically idle are now becoming the 
scenes of the greatest activity. 

Walter Vail, of Vail Bros., from Coalinga, was 
in Hanford Saturday to get some more material 
for work he is doing in the oil fields. He has 
been at work on a job for the 28 Oil Company for 
some time and will be there for quite a while yet. 

Kutner-Goldstein's plumbers loaded several 
large galvanized iron tanks on a car this week to 
be taken to Coalinga to fill an order the local firm 
received from the National Supply Company, of 
that city. 

Rumors of a change in the Standard's policy, as 
it effects Coalinga, are in the air. 

The standard 7-inch pipe for the renewal of 
the Associated Oil Company's west end line has 
been ordered, and is now on the way. On its 
arrival the work of taking up the old pipe and 
relaying the new will be rushed through. 

The Wabash has been connected up with the 
field system of the C. O. T., and is now deliver- 
ing to the new company the product of its two 
wells, aggregating about 200 barrels a day. 

The drillers began spudding on No. 3 of the 
St. Paul-Fresno on Wednesday. 

The Octave No. 2 is now 700 feet deep, with 
12% inch casing. 

Avon No. 1, which is capable of a production 
of about 200 barrels of 21 gravity oil, is pumping 
only enough oil to provide fuel for No. 2, there 
being at present no outlet for the oil. No. 2 is 
400 feet deep. 1000-barrel tank has just been 
set up on this lease. 

No. 3 on the Baker-St. Paul lease has been 
rigged up and will be spudding in a few days. 

No. 8 on the Maine State has reached a depth 
of 1300 feet. The 8-inch pipe is now being put 
in. 

S. D. Porter will assume personal charge of the 
Coalinga Iron Works in a few days. It is re- 
ported that Harry Augustine will succeed Mr. 
Porter as the superintendent of the Maine State 
lease. 

The New England and Coalinga Oil Company 
has begun suit against M. Condon, C. E. Boyd, 
C. H. Moore and others to oust them from the 
possession of an oil claim in 24-19-15. Damages 
for $5,000 are claimed. It is alleged that the 
defendants entered upon the premises on October 
24th, 1904, while the employees of the plaintiff 
were absent, and have since refused to allow 
plaintiff to have any work performed there. 

The Northeastern Oil Company in the Co- 
alinga fields has struck oil at about 1700 feet 
deep. It is not known what the quantity or the 
quality of the grease is but as the property is in 



the West Moreland country the oil is probably 
of light gravity. 

P. E. Metz, who is an employee for the Cali- 
fornia Oil Company, Limited, was badly hurt a 
few days ago, and he came in contact with a wire 
cable and had his left collar bone injured. He 
went to Hanford and consulted a doctor and was 
fixed up. 



SANTA MARIA 



Santa Maria, Cal., Oct. 9, 1904. 

The Union Oil Tool Company has completed 
its machine shops at Orcutt and on Monday 
began operations. It is the largest plant of its 
kind between San Jose and Los Angeles, and 
will give employment to a large force of skilled 
mechanics. The 16-room hotel has also been 
completed and everything in readiness for the 
guests. R. H. Herron Co., the big oil well sup- 
ply company, has opened its store with a complete 
line of supplies, and is right on the ground for 
whatever the oil men may want. 

The Graciosa Oil Company has let a contract 
for a nine mile 4-inch pipe line to Casmalia from 
its oil property. During the week the company 
got oil in its well No. 3, which flowed 800 bar- 
rels the first twenty-four hours. 

The Pennsylvania Co. is putting up its der- 
rick and proposes to have the same ready for 
drilling in another two weeks. 

The Coblentz Company is waiting for ma- 
terial, which, when it arrives, will see active 
operation pushed vigorously. 

The Kaiser well is being finished up, but on 
account of the heavy flow, the operators are se- 
riously handicapped. The well compares favor- 
ably with its neighbors, the Union and Pinal. 

The Clearmont Company, with Mr. Irwin 
at the head of it, will begin drilling on its 
400-acre tract recently acquired from Mr. Arel- 
lanes near Casmalia. 

Work on the Radium well is progressing 
rapidly. It is reported the drill has passed into 
the shale. 

No. 21 of the Western Union is now 2,700 
feet deep, and is showing up good. The sand will 
be drilled in as deep as possible. The company 
has two new rigs up close to the Graciosa line. 

It is reported that the Recruit Oil Co. has 
struck a good showing of oil at a depth of 1,700 
feet in its well on the Williams ranch in the 
Cat Canyon district. No particulars can be ob- 
tained owing to the reticence of the company. A 
good well here proves up an immense strip of 
territory. 



KERN 



The independent oil producers of California, 
after their meeting on November 2nd, filed arti- 
cles of incorporation with the County Clerk late 
that afternoon. Contracts have been signed by 
thirty-five independent companies, mostly operat- 
ing at Kern River, and representing a monthly 
production of over 600,000 barrels. 

The conditions named in the contracts have 
not yet been made public, but in substance they 
provide for the control of the prpduct by the 
association, the property's title remaining entirely 



with the contracting company. The association 
will market the product. 

The articles of incorporation place the capital 
stock at $100,000, divided into shares of the 
par value of $100 each. There will be thirty- 
five directors. The association will be author- 
ized to carry on a general oil business and will 
be known as the Independent Oil Producers' 
Agency, with the principal office in Bakersfield. 

The following officers are named : President, 
M. V. McQuigg, Monterey; first vice-president, 
Timothy Spellacy, Bakersfield ; second vice-presi- 
dent, F. F. Weed, San Francisco; treasurer, W. 
B. Robb, Bakersfield ; secretary, A. H. Liscomb, 
Bakersfield; auditing committee, W. H. Hill, T. 
O. Turner, J. Benson Wrenn, all of Bakers- 
field. 

The following are directors: T. Spellacy, W. 

B. Robb, A. H. Liscomb, W. S. Morton, W. W. 
Stephenson, C. H. Ritchie, L. P. St. Clair Jr., 
S. P. Wible, W. H. Hill, G. J. Planz, Lesser 
Hirchfeld, W. A. Ferguson, E. E. Jones, C. C. 
Bowles, J. F. Lucey, J. B. Batz, T. O. Turner, 

C. A. Barlow, H. A. Jastro, J. Benson Wrenn, 
W. D. Young, T. V. Doub, L. E. Doan, E. 
Dinkelspiel, Bakersfield; T. Earley, James F. 
Ker, Pasadena; F. F. Weed, L. Woodbury, E. 
Denicke, George W. Lane, San Francisco; A. J. 
Wallace, Los Angeles; M. V. McQuigg, Mon- 
terey; Thomas M. Gardner, F. P. Fuller, Oak- 
land ; F. N. Schofield, Kern. 

M. V. McQuigg, the president, when inter- 
viewed by a press representative, said: 

"You will get the best idea of the purposes of 
the company from the preamble of the by-laws. 
It is carefully worded and covers the ground 
fully. In brief, our purpose is simply to get 
together for protection, and when I say protec- 
tion I mean protection from each other rather 
than from any other organization. The bad con- 
dition in the oil market has been the fault, thief- 
ly, of the independent producers themselves. We 
have been cutting the price on each other and 
the purchasers of oil have very naturally bought 
where they could buy the cheapest. The organ- 
ization is primarily to remove this ruinous com- 
petition. We expect to maintain the friendliest 
relations with the Associated and the Standard 
and all other organizations in the oil business. 
In fact, we have organized not to fight, but to 
keep from fighting. 

"The agency will be a co-operative institu- 
tion. We do not expect to operate any of the 
properties that come into the organization, al- 
though that is among the powers of the agency. 
The companies will operate their own properties 
under licenses from the agency, but the agency 
will handle the product. 

"No, we do not anticipate going into the trans- 
portation business. We expect to sell our oil 
at the field. We are not depending on any one 
company to buy our oil, and in fact we have al- 
ready been approached by Eastern capital with a 
view to handling our output. This capital is 
wholly independent of anything- in the oil busi- 
ness on the Pacific Coast and I am satisfied that 
we will be able to dispose of our oil at its actual 
value. If we cannot we will simply store it until 
we can." 

Mr. McQuigg said that the expectation is 
that within a reasonable time the companies 
will be producing to their full capacity. If it 
should be necessary to store the oil no difficulty 
is anticipated in getting the capital to carry the 
organization. 

"We have a valuable product," said Mr. Mc- 
Quigg, "and when we get it together in tangible 
form we will be able to get what capital we need." 

Mr. McQuigg said that over 75 per cent, of 
the product of the independent producers in the 
Kern River field and nearly all of the product of 



PACIFIC i ill 



the Sunset field is now in tl 

n, however, until all 
of thf oil laml in the -■ uded. It is not 

probable Mr. McCjuigg said, that this organiza- 
tion will go into the Southern California fields. 
but if these fields nized it will likely be 

rn working in harmony with the 
here. The preamble of the by-laws of the 
Independent Oil Producers' Agencj to which 
Mr. McQuigg refers, is follows: 

"The purfx.se for which this organization is 
formed is to secure I stronger and more stable 
market tor fuel oil produced in the State of 
California b\ selling through a common agenc] 
the product of mam oil yielding properties, thus 
enabling this corporation to make contracts foi 
the delivery of oil in large quantities ami oyer 

extended periods of time: to lessen the cost of 

producing, storing, handling, shipping and selling 
such product; to promote the demand tor oil and 
increase the production thereof : to enable the 
owners of small properties to gain by co-operation 
with other oil producers the full advantage of 
the local oil market and all the benefits arising 
from a central organization having knowledge of 
the conditions of the market ami having an in- 
terest in the sustaining and supporting of the 
oil producing industry." 



Wire Rope Applications 

There is a common opinion that the manu- 
facture and use of wire rope is confined alto- 
gether to modern times. This conclusion is al- 
together erroneous for although the extensive use 
of wire rope for tramways and drilling cables 
dates from a very recent period, wire rope was 
used for many purposes even back to a period 
previous to the destruction of Pompeii, for a 
15-foot 3-strand bronze wire rope has been taken 
from the ruins and is now on exhibition in a 
museum at Naples. Fiber rope was manufac- 
tured and used by the Egyptians, palm fibre 
rope having been found in tombs dating back to 
more than 3,000 years B. C. 



The age of th 

Id illustration show ing a fixed 
tramu at I >am 

earth from 
ghboring hill to .1 fortification then being 
erected. 

Wire rope making as now known is a pn 
of the nineteenth century, among its earliest 
practical applications being a suspension bridge at 
I, Switzerland, erected in 1822, and a sim- 
ilar structure at Freiburg in 183s. The rope 
used known as "selvagee," consisted of a bundle 

of parallel untwisted wires wound spirally with 
a fine wire cover. This form possessed great 
strength and rigidity, but was nol elastic and was 
unsuited for rough usage. 

"Formed rope" was the next stage in the de 
velopment, and was made up usual!] of Four 

strands twisted to :ach strand being given 

an extra twist, so as to give it a permanent set 
and keep the rope together. This twisting ol 
the strands shortened the life of the rope and the 
modern "laid rope" was accordingly developed. 
In this the various strands are laid together 
spirally without tension in the wires themselves. 

The earliest record of the use of wire rope 
for transmission of power is 1852, when a 260- 
foot drive was installed at a factory in Logel- 
bach, in Alsace, and transmitted 12 horse- 
power. 

The advantages of aerial transportation by 
means of wire rope tramways over all other 
methods of handling material are so thoroughly 
understood that it is not necessary to dwell upon 
them. Material such as ore, coal, grain, stone, 
sand, timber, etc., may be economically trans- 
ported over practically any condition of country, 
length of line or in any capacity desired. 

The Leschen Co.'s Patent Automatic Aerial 
Wire Rope Tramway, as its name implies, is an 
improved automatic system of the double rope 
type in which the carriers travel upon a station- 
ary track cable and are propelled by an endless 



The operation of the tramwaj 

ial to a m 

• • tils have all 
out In at tual trials mu\ on! 
.1 for each pan 
in the wear and tear and resultin 
diminution ost of maintenance of the 

tramu 

The length to which an automatic s\ item can 
be built and economical l\ operated is practically 
without limit, varying from a few hundred feet 
to anj length beyond. This is exemplified by the 
automatic tramwaj built at Encampment, Wyo., 

1 total length of over sixteen n 
It is customarj in practice to divide a long 
tramwaj in several sections, depending upon va- 
rious conditions, such as length, capacity, gra 
dients, etc. 

The cables or wire ropes in the Leschen Co.'s 
Patent Automatic Tramway are supported bj 
towers built USliallj of wood, although steel con- 
struction is frequently used. The number, hi 
and spacing of the towers depend mainly upon the 
profile of the ground. On level stretches they 
are placed usually 250 feet apart, but where con- 
ditions of route demand it, towers'can be spaced 
from 2,000 to 3,000 feet apart. The track ropes 
rest on long bearing saddles placed on the tow- 
ers, while the traction rope is supported by guide 
sheaves placed directly below. The saddles are 
of special construction, preventing any sharp 
bends in the rope when the carrier wheels are 
passing over the tower. The sheaves are made 
sectional with removable hard, white iron wear- 
ing rings, which can easily be replaced wdien 
worn, at minimum cost. All sheaves are provided 
with self-lubricating phosphor bronze bushings 
requiring no oil. 

The shape of the flanges and groves of the 
tower sheaves are such as to accommodate the 
shape of the clip on the traction rope, so that 
this rope always rests in the sheave whether a 



OUR NEXT DIVIDEND PAYERS 



AMERICAN DUCHESS OIL COMPANY. 

The Duchess Company will be our next dividend payer. The first 
100,000 shares at five cents per share WAS OVER-SUBSCRIBED. The 
second block at the same price is almost gone. A small amount of stock left 
at five cents per share, subject to advance or withdrawal without notice. 
ADVANCE OF 100% OR MORE WITHIN A SHORT TIME. 
We have received a number of large telegraphic orders in response to the 
adv. that appeared in this paper last week on page 15. It is the careful in- 
vestor who is buying the shares of the Duchess Company in large blocks. 

We have one stock that is paying a dividend of $5.00 a share on every 
100 shares each month. If that interests you, let us tell you about it. 
Let us tell you about another dividend payer that we have made within the 
past year. 

GOLDFIELD, NEVADA, 

THE GREATEST GOLDFIELD DISCOVERED 

IN RECENT YEARS. 

We are organizing a company to develop a first-class property at Gold- 



field, Nevada. We will soon have 100 subscriptions of $100 each. Ten 
thousand dollars pays for the property with no indebtedness against the 
company and sufficient cash to start work. Half of the shares to be placed 
in the treasury. The other half will be divided among the promoters in 
even proportion to the amount of money invested. Parties putting in more 
than $100 will receive their pro rata of the shares. We will sell the 
treasury' shares to carry on rapid development. Here is a chance to get in 
at bottom prices. We subscribed $1000 and our friends within a few hours 
subscribed $3000. We will have the full $10,000 within a few days. 

Join this promotion and get shares at the organization price. Company 
will be handled by competent business men of San Francisco. 

LOOK INTO THIS BEFORE YOU BUY ANY GOLDFIELD 
STOCKS. 

DEBENTURE SURETY COMPANY (Inc.) 

Rialto Building, San Francisco, Cal. 
I r se the (Fires. It Pays. 



PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 



bucket is passing over a tower or not. This is 
of special importance, as in most systems the 
traction rope is guided on rollers located about 
six feet or more below the saddles, so that the. 
rope is necessarily raised a distance of at least 
four feet when the carriers pass over a tower. 
The strain thus produced in passing over a sharp 
bend or knuckle is enormous and of a serious na- 
ture, which will always be a source of trouble. 
In the Leschen Company's Automatic System 
this feature is entirely avoided and the wear upon 
the cable and rolling stock is greatly reduced. 
A skip is used on the towers to guide the traction 
rope in the grove of the sheave in case it is mis- 
placed from any cause. 

The clips used in the Leschen Company's Au- 
tomatic Wire Rope Tramway, to which the car- 
riers are attached, are spaced according to the de- 
sired tonnage. The clip is of flat construction 
with a button-shaped end. 

The clips are attached to the traction rope by 
means of two specially forged bands, which en- 
circle the rope and have the lay of the rope forged 
in them. Owing to the positive hold on the rope 
and its double security, it is absolutely impossible 
for the carriers to slip on the line irrespective 
of the grade or load. The uncertainty of de- 
pending on friction or compression is a feature 
entirely overcome in the Leschen Company's Au- 
tomatic Tramway by the use of this style of clip. 
The wear on the traction rope is, furthermore, 
greatly reduced, owing to the fact that no abra- 
sion takes place when the carriers are attached 
to the clips. It is possible to operate the rope 
under as well as over the guide sheaves, a point 
of considerable importance when intermediate 
loading or unloading stations are desired. 

This clip is absolutely safe, and can not slip on 

the rope. The carriers cannot become detached 

from it until it is desired to do so and always iru- 

sures a carrier being carried from one end of the 

. line to the other. 

The type of carrier used in the Leschen Com- 
pany's Automatic Tramway is usually in the 
shape of a bucket six and one-half cubic feet in 
capacity, although this construction and size is 
very frequently altered to suit the requirements 
of a heavy tonnage or for bulky material. This 
bucket is hung in a pendant which in turn is at 
tached to a carriage consisting of a yoke and two 
special cast steel sheaves for traveling over the 
track ropes. This arrangement allows free 
movement, thereby permitting the entire bucket 
and pendant to hang perpendicular irrespective of 
the grade. The buckets are so hung in the pend- 
ants that it is impossibel for them to tip over of 
themselves whether empty, half loaded or carry- 
ing full capacity, and it requires no locking to 
keep them in their proper position. The sheaves 
have brass bushings and are fitted with malleable 
oil cups for oiling the journals. To the bottom 
of the bucket is attached a pin used in connection 
with the automatic discharging devices at the 
unloading terminal. In the pendant is placed the 
clip frame in which the traction rope clip is en- 
gaged. This frame econsists of a snow-proof 
housing and two trips operated by a sliding frame, 
all being made of the best malleable iron and cast 
steel. 

When a carrier is in transit the clip is en- 
gaged between the two trips, but when the bucket 
reaches a terminal, one trip is dropped back, al- 
lowing the clip to pass out of the housing and thus 
detaching the bucket from the tramway. The 
trip is moved back by the sliding frame, which is 
raised by a curved bar at each terminal. In a 
similar fashion a bucket is also attached to the 
clip, after which the two trips are locked to pre- 
vent them from opening. This entire operation 
is automatic, requiring no attendants whatsoever. 



Flow of Natural Gas 
Increased by . . . 

Coo per's Gas Lift 

Also flow of water 
or oil Increased and 
gas saved 

A. S. COOPER, C.E., 



219 Crocker Building 
San Francisco, Cal. 

AT A BARGAIN. 

Standard Drilling Rig with full equipment of 
small tools. Boiler and engine in first-class con- 
dition. Address Exchange No. 21, care this 
journal. 



The 

Madero 

Rancho 

Consisting of 1 60 acres in Monterey 
county, 25 miles from tide water, 7 
miles from Kings City. 

Excellent Indications of Valuable 

Oil Deposits 

Timber on the property for fuel pur- 
poses. Good water supply. En- 
dorsed by principal experts in the 
country as valuable oil land. Must 
. be sold at once. Title in fee simple. 
MRS. G. G. MADERO, 
Room 32, 318 Pine St., San Francisco. 



WANTED — Position as Superintendent of an 
oil company. Thirty years' experience in 
Pennsylvania, Ohio and California. Best of 
reference. Address, 

"PETROLEUM," care this paper. 



We Promote, Finance and Incorporate 

Let us show you the advantages of incorporating your business or enterprise. 
If you need money to enlarge your business, permit us to secure it for you, by selling 
stock through our Eastern correspondents. 

CONSOLIDATED AUDITING COMPANY 

307 to 310 Mills Building, San Francisco. 
Telephone Bush 849. 

WRITE US TO-DAY ! 
If you want to invest your money in a sound business proposition where you are sure 
to receive ten dollars for every one dollar invested 

BUY BUFFALO-CALIFORNIA OIL STOCK. 
This company is incorporated under a special act of Congress providing for the incor- 
poration of companies in the District of Columbia, making our stock absolutely non-assessable 
and non-taxable. We hold some of the most valuable oil property in the well known 

HALFMOON BAY DISTRICT, 
San Mateo County, California, 
Now possessing many fine oil wells producing 52° to 55° gravity oil. But we cannot tell it all 
here. Write us for full particulars. 

BUFFALO-CALIFORNIA OIL CO., 

Fletcher Block, 

Livermore, California. 

C. V. Hall Iron Works 

(LOCATION, OLINDA, ORANGE CO., CAL.) 

POSTOFFICB ADDRESS, Route No. 2, 
FULLERTON. CAL. 

Los Angeles Office, 222 Wilcox Building, 
LOS 'NGELES, CAL. 

The C. V. H. Chain Tongs can be had through 
any dealer in oil well supplies. 

These tongs are made of the very best steel, 
in any size, and always give satisfaction. 

Manufacturers or users of chain tongs do so 
at their own risk, in any infringements of 
Patent No. 438,1TT, the ownership of 
which belongs to the undersigned. 

CHARLES VICTOR HALL. 




PACIFIC OIL RLPOR 



The i rentlv 

I with 
■ 
In transporting lumber, bales, 

■ .ire pro\ id 
il anchor frequentl) 

ly in (ram" one mile in 

the track 

inchored to a tension 
• hilr the nilii-r section is anchored 
in the ground. Rail connects both of the see- 
that the travel of the bucket is 
not interrupted but continues l>y the tension sta- 
linn without any attendance. The traction rope 
is L'tiiilril by sheaves at these stations. 

Whenever desired, intermediate loading <>r un- 
loading stations arc provided for at practically 
an) point along the line. IWIi terminal stations 
of the Leschen Company's Automatic System are 
provided with a sheave wheel of large diameter, 
around which the traction rope passes. In the 
periphery of one of these sheaves, usually the one 
at the upper terminal, is placed a series of grips 
tor securing the necessarj friction for either con- 
trolling or operating the tramway. 

The grips in the grip wheels take hold of the 
rope from the outside and in such a manner as 
not to injure it in any way. Brake riiiLrs are 
used, when necessary and are holted to the arms 
of the terminal wheel, so that applying a brake 
stops the running rope and therefore the entire 
tramu a\ . 

The brakes for controlling the tramway are 
operated by levers so located that a single attend- 
ant can attend to the controlling of the tramway 
and can also load the carriers from the chute of 
the bin. 

When the loaded buckets travel down grade 
and the difference in elevation is sufficient, the 
tramway will operate by the force due to gravity. 
If this is not the case, power can be applied by 
means of bevel bearing attached to the terminal 
shaft and operated by an engine, motor, water- 
wheel or other sources of power. 

The standing or track ropes upon entering the 
upper terminal are anchored to special fasten- 
ings. An overheard rail connects both standing 
ropes, allowing the buckets to .travel over this rail 
from one track cable to the other. By means of 
a. patented lever device, the speed of all incoming 
Carriers after being detached from the tramway 
is gradually retarded and placed in a position of 
rest at the loading point. In like manner and by 
means of a similar device, the speed of all buckets 
is first accelerated to the travel of the traction 
rope before the carrier is attached to the tram- 
way. 

All of the above operations are automatic in 



FOR SALE. 



,i per 

share. 

\v. I . i; \k\ VRD, 
Tenth Street, Oakland, California 



We manufacture the best 
lubricating oils for oil 
drillers 

KING KEYSTONE OIL CO., 
204 Front St., San Francisco. 



BARGAIN 

Complete Oil Rig for Sale 

Including two 8ti-iny Toole 
and Fishing Tools 

Over 3000 leet ol caging In £ood condl- 

ti n-some never uhciI alXM, II ;.,, 

9?<; 8 inch and 8 inch drive pipe 

The Above Property 
Cost Over $10,000 

and is for Bale at a hargain 

Exchange No. 22 

Care this Publication 



H 



KROHN 
WIRE ROPE SOCKET 



THE ONLY SOCKET USING A BALL CLUTCH 



LASTING QUALITIES UNEQUALLED 



PATENT 



CLUTCH 




DEVICE 



Fop Sale by ALL 

OIL WELL SUPPLY HOUSES 



J 



LLEWELLYN IRON WORKS 

SOLE MANUFACTURERS 

LOS ANGELES, CAL. 

Write for Circular 





ALL 
UP 

OIL WELL TO 

SUPPLIES DATE 

R. H. HERRON CO. 



STOCK! 



FISHING TOOLS 
FOR RENT 

509 MISSION STREET 

SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 



12 



PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 



their entirety, requiring no labor to attend to 
same. All jars and jerks are thus avoided by the 
above devices and an even motion is produced, 
greatly increasing the life of not only the terminal 
machinery, but the rolling stock and cable as 
well. 

The lower terminal of the Leschen Company's 
Automatic Aerial Wire Rope Tramway is similar 
"to the upper terminal. The standing cables are 
generally attached to weight boxes or tension de- 
vices, while the sheave around which the traction 
rope passes is mounted on a movable truck with 
weight box attachments for maintaining the nec- 
essary tension. The automatic handling of buck- 
ets at this terminal is the same as that of the 
upper terminal. 

The automatic dumping -device is generally 
used at this station, which is so arranged that a 
bar engages the pin at the bottom of the bucket, 
and, by raising it, tilts the bucket and discharges 
its contents. This frame is operated by the ter- 
minal shaft. 

In the operation of this system there are al- 
ways two carriers, one at the' upper terminal 
ready to load or loaded, and one at the lower 
terminal dumped or ready to be dumped. By 
having these two carriers in addition to those 
in transit the capacity is not decreased in having 
to stop the machine for loading or unloading. 

Another advantage possessed by an automatic 
system is that the carriers, unlike all other double 
rope devices, pass entirely around the terminals 
over the rail without being detached in order to 
clear the sheave, wheels. Furthermore, it is not 
necessary to have the buckets taken from the line 
to load or unload, although this can be done if it 
is desirable to do so. These important features 
are embodied in this system only. 

Owing to the fact that in this system the clip 
on the traction rope will allow it to run over or 
under a sheave, the terminals can be built very 
compact and rigid, and can, furthermore, be 
built in a horizontal position and by deflecting 
the traction rope by means of guide sheaves, re- 
duce the cost of construction a considerable 
amount. The sheaves are similar to those on 
the towers and are placed in a true curve of large 
radius, which can be adjusted to suit any angle. 

Whenever desired, a speical scales for auto- 
matically indicating the weight of the material 
transported is furnished, and also counters for 
keeping a record of the number of buckets car- 
ried daily. 

Supplies, such as coal, light merchandise, feed, 
etc., can be carried over the system as return 
freight whenever desired. 

The principal advantages possessed by the 
Leschen Company's Automatic Aerial Wire 
Rope Tramway are as follows: Automatic, per- 
fect clip, large capacity, absolute safety, low cost 
of operation, small expense for maintenance. 

One of the latest uses of wire rope is in drilling 
oil wells. Wire sand lines have been used for 
some time, but it is only recently that wire rope 
has been used to any degree for drilling cables. 
Its superiority over the old manila cable is ad- 
mitted by all, and it is safe to say that the re- 
sults obtained in drilling some of the deep wells 
of this State could not have been obtained with 
the old-style cable. In most of the fields of this 
State wire drilling cable is being adopted alto- 
gether as fast as the manila cables become worn 
out. In the Santa Maria field manila cables are 
not used at all except for spudding. The day of 
the manila cable has passed except for the drill- 
ing of shallow wells. There is no better drilling 
cable manufactured than that of the A. Leschen 
& Sons Rope Company. 



FRESNO COUNTY ABSTRACT COMPANY 

Incorporated Under the Laws of California January 21, 1901. 

Capital Stock $100,000.00 

rui_i_Y PAID UP 

SEARCHERS OF RE CORDS AND CONVEYANCE 

Abstracts of Title Caref ully Compil ed at Reasonable Rates. 

NO. 1115 K ST., FRESNO, CAL 



BARGAINS 

IN 

Secondhand Boilers and Engines 

Also Oil Well Casing, all sizes 

All in First-Class Condition 

Address 

H. H. R. Care this Paper 



Real Estate 
Insurance 



Oil Lands 

N. L. PALMER 

NOTARY PUBLIC 
COALINGA, = - = ■= CAL 



ALWAYS FIRST: 



Ever had trouble in getting the size 
of casing or drive pipe you needed? 



TRY US: 



We can help you. We carry ALL the regular 
sizes and the following specials: 

13^2 inch Boston " Diamond B" Casing 42 pounds 



12^ 



10 

9 s /s " 

8X " 

7/a " 

65/ 8 " 

5S/8 " 

4^ " 

7 " 
5 
2 



(( (t 



(( (I 



" 34- 

" 35 

" 30X 

" 241/ 

20 

" 17^ 

17 

" 939 

Drive Pipe 23.27 

" 14.50 

' Tubing 4^ 

" sy 2 



Don't you think we can suit you ? 



THE NATIONAL SUPPLY COMPANY 

Los Angeles, San Francisco, Bakersf ield, 
Mc Kitti'ick, Coalinga, Santa Maria. 



PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 







' 






the Califor- 




hclil for the week ending Wei. 




k — 




1 1 








1 








- tandard — 




100 shares at 


.18 


— 






.35 


Fultoi 






.. 


( )il — 




Bid 


.4S 


Iced 


.50 


Home — 







.65 




.(.7 


200 shares at 


.(.8 


Glares at 


..." 


300 >liares at 


. .70 


shares at 


.. .71 




.72 


Independence — 




5,000 shares at 


.30 


1,124 shares at 


.32 


function — 




1 shares at 


.14 


Monarch — 






'ii 


1 00 shares at 


25 


1 1 l! i shares at 


.30 


Monte Cristo — 






.70 




.75 




.771.'. 


Occidental — 




1,000 shares at 


.03 


( )il City Petroleum — 




00 shares at 


.57 




.58 


Reed Crude — 




100 shares at 


. 2.00 


Soverign — 




300 shares at 


.33 




.34 


Sterling — 




100 shares at 


. 2 . 00 


Twenty-Eight — 






. 10.00 


Following are the latest quotations for stocks 


of oil companies listed on the California Ctock 


and Oil Exchange: 




Bid. 


Asked. 


Ass. Oil Co. Stk. Tr. Cer. .26 




Aztec 60 




California-Standard 17 


.19 


Caribou 5.00 


7 . 00 


Central Point Con 72 








Claremont SO 


.85 




.40 


Esperanza 80 


1.50 


Fauna 


.20 


Fortv 35 




Four 50 


.57 


Giant 22 




Hanford 


185.00.. 


Home 61 


.65 


Illinois Crude 


.75 




17.00 


Independence 30 


.33 






Kern 4.75 




Kern River 11.00 








Monarch of Arizona 25 


.40 


Monte Cristo 


.80 


Nevada County 


.50 


Occidental of W. Va 03 


.04 


Oil City Petroleum 57 


.58 


Peerless 


13.00 


Reed Crude 1.95 






.34 


Sterlim; 2.00 




Superior 


.10 



WESTERN COOPERAGE CO. 

MANUFACTURERS OP 

STAVES and HEADING 

For Both Tiftht and Slack Work. 
OUR SPECIALTIES ARE 

WhiteSpruceSavesand Heading Fir Tight Barrel Stares and 

all read* to set up lor fish, Heading lor Oil, Lard, Pork. 

Pickles or Lard packages of Bee( r tc [(c 

any size. 'o<k> 

Fir Slack Barrel Staves and Heading for Asphalt, Lime 
Cement and Bottle Barrels. 



Prompt and Courteous Attention to all Inquiries, 



MILLS at Aberdeen, Wash, and Houllon, Ore. 



SMITH, EMERY & CO 

CHEMICAL ENGINEERS Mfr^ 
TECHNICAL. OIL. WORK 



ANALYSIS OF 

Petroleum, Soluble Salts, 
Asphalt, Coal, Coke. 

Residues, Feed Waters, 

Snlphur, Drinking Waters, 

Gypsum, Minerals, Etc. 



Umpire Work on Oil Contracts. 
Chemical and Physical Laboratories. 



83-85 New Montgomery Street 
SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 



Lacy Manufacturing Company 



Manufacturers of 




Steel Water Pipe 
General Sheet 
Iron Works 
Oil Well Casing 
Oil Stills 

OIL STORAGE AND WAGON TANKS 

Works: Cor. New Main and Date streets, P. O. Box 231, Station C. 

Baker Block Telephone Main 196 

Office, 334 North Main Street, Los Angeles, Cal. 

BATES' 

PATENT CASINO TONQS 




1416-1426 19th St., Bakersfield, Cal. 



Fills a long-felt want. No more need of 
pole and rope for screwing up casing. Bates 
Tongs can be applied to the casing anywhere 
in driving or pulling without danger of injury 
or parting casing. 

Set No. 1, with any two size jaws from g$4 
to 13 j4 inches. 

Set No. 2, with any two size jaws from 4 to 
9^8 inches. 











IP 


ii§K':£Hh 










' 










up. By 


























r -*2? 


..**,'* 1 WBBk 




' ' '" 











CAR TANKS AND STORAGE TANKS 

FOR ALL. USES 

We Carry in Stock Car Tanks of following sizes: We Carry in Slock Storage Tanks for Oil 

6,000 Gallons of all sizes up to and inching 

7 OOO " se.ooo barrels 

8 OOO " 

and can mount on'wood or steel under names. ON Ref inef.eS Complete OttT Specially 

WARREN CITY BOILER WORKS 

OFFICE! and WORKS:-WARREN. OHIO. 



H 

Senator 72 

Thirty-Three 

Toltec 22 

Twenty-Eight 10.00 

United Petroleum 

West Shore 

Wolverine 40 



PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 



7.00 

12.00 

101.00 

2.25 



NOTES. 



C. A. Canfield was a recent visitor to the Co- 
alinga field. 

W. E. Sims, of McKittrick, is visiting his rel- 
atives in Coalinga. 

H. B: Guthrey and wife arrived in Coalinga 
Tuesday and have taken up their residence on the 
Guthrie lease. 

Max Grosmayer and Sam Johnson of Santa 
Maria were in San Francisco during the wee<. 

It is stated that the John Martin interests, 
which secured control of Hanford Oil Company, 
are endeavoring to buy up the control of Twenty- 
Eight Oil Company at $10 per share. 

Emile F. Bernard is in Bakersfield from Co- 
alinga, where he put in most of his time attend- 
ing to his oil interests. He has received word 
from Mrs. Bernard that their daughter, Mrs. 
Berg, who was seriously ill, is slowly recovering. 

Wm. Graham, the well-known oil man, to- 
gether with his wife, is taking an extended vaca- 
tion in the East. 

The Alma Oil Company is now paying its regu- 
lar quarterly dividend of 3 cents per share on the 
capital stock of the company, amounting to $12,- 
000. 

The Peerless Oil Company is now paying its 
regular monthly dividend of 14 cents per share 
on the capital stock of the company, amounting to 
$14,000. 

The Imperial Oil Company has just paid a 
monthly dividend of 20 cents per share, amounting 
to $20,000. 

The Thirty-Three Oil Company has just paid 
a monthly dividend of 10 cents per share, amount- 
ing to $10,000. 

The Coalinga Pacific Oil and Gas Company 
has been listed on the California Stock and Oil 
Exchange. ■ The company has a capital of $165,- 
000, with as many shares each of a par value of 
$1 ; 65,575 shares have teen issued. 

The Soverign Oil Company has declared a reg- 
ular quarterly dividend of iy 2 cents per share, 
amounting to $7,500, payable November 15. 
The Sterling Oil Company has also declared a 
regular quarterly dividend of 7 cents per share, 
amounting to $17,500, payable November 15. 

The Brea Canyon Oil Company of Fullerton 
has secured a gusher, and if pressure counts, there 
is a prospect that it will turn out the best well in 
the canyon. The well is No. 20 and was finished 
at about 2100, more gas being encountered than 
in any other well. It is thought that the produc- 
tion will be 1500 to 2000 barrles of 20 gravity 
oil. The well was begun six months ago. 

The wire business in Coalinga is better than 
it has ever been before, as the contractors are 
realizing the merits of wire cable over drilling 
gear made of any other material. 

A. R. MacDonald, editor and proprietor of the 
Coalinga Oil Record was a vistor in San Fran- 
cisco this week. 

Chas. E. Webb, a Coalinga oil man, has re- 
turned from a trip to Du Quoin, 111., and this 
morning went to the oil fields. 

The Coalinga Telephone Company is making 
excellent progress with the local system. Prac- 
tically all of the field lines have been taken over, 
and before long the town and oil fields will be 
adequately covered. 



H 



PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 

is the only 

OIL JOURNAL 

Published on the 

Pacific Coast. 

It gives full, fresh and authentic oil news from 
all the oil districts, new and old. It exposes 
fraudulent oil companies. It gives the latest 
information on oil stocks and dividends. It 
describes the latest method of drilling wells, 
pumping, piping and storing oil; use of oil for 
road making, etc. 

It is the only paper which advocates the beliei 
that California's refined asphalt, is the equal 
of Trinidad asphalt for paving and other pur- 
poses, and is in every way superior to bitumi- 
nous rock, the use of which has given San 
Francisco, Oakland and other California cities 
so many poor streets. 

The subscription price is $2.50 a year. If you 
are interested In any way in California oil, cut 
out the following coupon, fill In the blank lines, 
and send it, accompanied by check, money 
or express order to the 

PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 

318 Pine St. San Francisco 



Subscription Blank 



ri ybar $2.90 

6 Months 1.50 

1 3 Months 1.00 



Jop- 



Pacific Oil Reporter 

318 Pine Street San Francisco. 

Please enter my subscription to the PACIFIC OIL. REPORTER 

at $ — 



Signed 



Address 



Date- 



PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 



Vol. 6. No. 3 



San Francisco, Cal., Saturday-, Nov. 19, 1Q04 



Price Ten Cents 



PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 

Published Weekly. 
The Oil Authority of the Pacific Coast. 

v California Petroleum Miners' Ass'n. 

MARIA R. WINN, Proprietor. 

\> I'M \N, Editor and Manager. 

OFFICE AND EMTORIAL ROOMS 

318 Pine Street - - San Francisco, California 
Telephone, Bush 176. 

TERMS. 

On« Year 126.) 

Sir Month! 1 60 

Three Months 1 00 

Single Copies lOo 

STRICTLY IN ADVANCE. 

Money should be sent by Postal Order, Draft or 
Registered Letter, addressed to Paclrlo Oil Reporter, 
IIS Pine Street. San Francisco, rooma 31-32-33. Com- 
munications must be accompanied by writer's name 
and address, not necessarily for publication, but as 
a guarantee of good faith. 

Entered In the PostofBce at San Francisco, Cali- 
fornia, as second class matter. 

Latest Quotations 



Following are the latest quotations for Cali- 
fornia crude oil at the wells: 

COALINGA. 

Prices 
Gravity at 60° temperature. per barrel. 

Oil of 22° up to but not including 24° . . . .20 

Oil of 24° up to but not including 25°. . . .30 

Oil of 25° up to but. not including 26° . . . .35 

Oil of 26° up to but not including 27° . . . .40 

Oil of 27° up to but not including 28° . . . .45 

Oil of 28° up to but not including 29° . . . .50 

Oil of 29° up to but not including 30° . . . .55 
Fuel oil, 14 degrees gravity or better. .'-. . .15 

KERN. 

Fuel oil, 14 degrees gravity or better 15 

KANSAS-INDIAN TERRITORY. 

Oil of 32 degrees gravity $0.87 

Oil of 31 ^2 degrees gravity 82 

Oil of 31 degrees gravity 77 

Oil of 3D i _, degrees gravity 72 

Oil of 30 degrees gravity 67 

Oil "t 29j 2 degrees gravity 62 

Oil of 29 degrees gravity 57 

( )il of 281 o degrees gravity 52 

( )il of 28 degrees gravity 47 

EASTERN QUOTATIONS. 

Pennsylvania 1 .56 

Tiona . 1.71 

Corning 1 .33 

New Castle 1.43 

North Lima 1-05 

South Lima 1-00 

Indiana 1-00 

Corsicana, light 85 

Corsicana, heavy 50 

Somerset 1 .01 

Ragland 60 

Petrolea (Ont.) 1-53 

TEXAS. 

Beaumont 35 

Sour Lake 35 

Saratoga 35 

Batson 33 



SANTA MARIA. 

Gravity at 60° Price per Barrel 

Temperature. at Port Harford. 

25 up to but not including 26 c $ .50 

26 up to but not including 27" 55 

p to but not including 28° 60 

28 up to but not including 2 l V 65 

29 up to but not including 30 70 

p to but not including 31° 75 

31° up to but not including 32° 80 

32 and up 85 



Kerosene, Pearl, per gal., 19' »c; Astral, 
c; Star, ta%c; Extra Star, 24c; Eocene, 
23c; Elaine, 26c; Water White, in bulk, 13c; 
do 150 deg., 13c; do, extra fine, 15c; Mineral 
Seal, iron bbls., 18c; wooden bbls., 20%c; do, 
cs., 24c: Deodorized Stove Gasoline, in bulk, 
:6c; do, in cs., 22%c; 86 deg. Gasoline, in bulk, 
25c; cs.. 31c; 83 deg. Naphtha or Benzine, de- 
odorized, in bulk, per gal., 13c; do, in cs., I9 1 / 2 c. 



It is now officially announced that the P. C. 
O. Co. will, in the near future, commence to 
pump Coalinga oil into its great steel tanks in 
the Kern River field. This provision will be 
made to take care of the surplus from the Coalin- 
ga field over and above the amount that the com- 
pany wishes to pump to its Point Richmond re- 
finery. It was long ago demonstrated that the 
Kern oil could be cheaply stored in earthen 
reservoirs, and the P. C. O. Co. have con- 
structed several of them for the purpose. It 
also erected a great number of 55,000-barrel 
steel tanks in which heavy Kern oil has been 
stored. The present policy of the company is to 
empty these steel tanks into earthen reservoirs 
and to utilize the steel ones for the Coalinga oil. 
With over six millions of barrels storage capacity 
at Kern suitable for the Coalinga oil the company 
is pretty well fixed for present requirements. 
We do not believe there is any intention to mix 
the Coalinga with the Kern oil to permit its be- 
ing more easily pumped through the pipe line. 
It seems to be simply a case of so much available 
storage and it makes little difference where it is as 
long as it is connected with the pipe line system. 
By adopting this policy the P. C. O. Co. now 
has a pipe line capacity surpassing the entire 
production of the Coalinga field. 



The hardships imposed upon some of our oil 
companies, which have been shut in for long 
periods of time, are apparent in the conditions 
surrounding the California Fortune Oil Co., 
which has just held its annual meeting. Alto- 
gether four wells have been developed on this 
property, all being flowing wells with strong gas 
pressure. As there has been no transportation 
facilities by which the product could be mar- 
keted it was necessary to partly cap the wells, 
a small opening being left to prevent the pres- 
sure becoming so great as to throw the casing 
out of the wells. In two years over 150,000 
barrels of oil ]ias flowed through these openings 
although even- effort has been made to check the 
flow to its lowest possible minimum. Just what 



the wells would have Bowed under favorable 
conditions is a conjecture, but the amount is con 
servativelj placed at 2,000,000 barrels. At 25 

cents a barrel this would have brought rhi 

panj $500,000. To provide for the present flow 

of the wells the companj ed 

merit of 5 cents a share to provide funds for 
the constru 00,000 barrel reservoir. 

This reservoir will be filled at once. With this 
:ii or oil in storage the management of the 
company believes that a purchaser can be found 
who will provide for transportation on a guar- 
antee of say 2.000,000 barrels within a given 
period. This could be done with 650,000 barrels 
which the company will soon ha ige. A 

stockholder in this company who would not pay 
his assessment to provide storage for the product 
would he a hard case indeed — something like a 
man who wouldn't purchase a pocket-book to 
keep his money in. 



Coalinga is the busiest field in California. 
Our statistics for October prove this to be a fact. 
One of the most notable features of the field is 
the large amount of new work commenced. Be- 
sides this we know of a great amount of develop- 
ment contemplated which will materially increase 
the production of the field within the next few 
months. The Coalinga field has proven to be all 
that was predicted of it and as the limits of the 
proven territory are gradually extended by the 
frequent bringing in of good wells it is generally 
conceded that Coalinga's "oil boom" has but just 
commenced. The good price paid for all the 
lighter grades of oil has caused the eastern limits 
of the field to be more rapidly developed than 
any other part. The Coalinga-Peerless and 
Forty Oil companies are notable examples and 
some of the most valuable territory in that dis- 
trict is being developed. The town of Coalinga 
is feeling the prosperity of the field and is build- 
ing up rapidly. Water and elect!-' light systems 
are being installed. It is said that the population 
of the town has doubled ever)' six months for the 
past two years. 



Only two articles are made directly from 
natural gas. They are lampblack and gas coke. 
The former is still an article of manufacture, 
but the other ceased to be manufactured when the 
natural gas began to be consumed in an econom- 
ical manner. In isolated districts where it is 
difficult to convey the gas to the market numerous 
wells have been made profitable by converting 
the natural gas into lampblack. The process is 
. extremely wasteful, as the quantity of carbon ac- 
tually secured is probobly not much more than 
one-twentieth of the carbon contained in the 
original volume of the natural gas. These manu- 
facturers of lampblack cause a great number of 
small burning jets of gas to play upon a 2 
pipe through which there is a circulation of water 
to keep it cold. The carbon is deposited in a 
very thin film on the outer surface, and when once 
deposited is such a good nonconductor that it in- 
creases only slightly in thickness and must be 
often removed. Scrapers and brushes are ar- 
ranged to clear off and collect the deposit auto- 
matically. 



PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 



I* 



Natural Gas 

By A. 



£? j& 



S. CO 



in California 

OPE 11, M. E. j& j& 



VII. 

STRUCTURE OF THE COAST RANGES. 

The valleys, hills, rivers and streams of the 
Coast Ranges owe their form and direction more 
to uplifts and subsidences than to denudation, 
whereas these geographical features of the Sierra 
Nevada owe their form and direction more to 
denudation than to uplifts and subsidences of 
their surface. 

The trend of the valleys, lulls, rivers and 
streams of the Coast Ranges is in a northwest 
and southeast direction, whereas . the trend of 
these geographical features in the Sierra Nevada 
is southwest and northeast nearly at right angles 
to the Sierra Nevada chain of mountains. 




Relief IVlap of California, by N. F. Drgke, cour- 
tesy Lewis E. Aubury, State Mineralogist. 

The white lines on Fig. 15 represent the general 
direction of the faults, fissures, anticlines, 
synclines, rivers, valleys and mountain chains 
of the Coast Ranges. Also the faults, fissures 
and lodes of the Sierra Nevada. When one 
gas well is found if the direction of the white 
lines are followed in making the location of 
additional wells, other gas wells should be 
found. The white lines show that a number 
of the faults, fissures, anticlines and synclines 
of the Coast Ranges disappear beneath the 
alluvial filling of the Great Valley. They prob- 
ably extend for a long distance beneath this 
f i 1 1 i n g . 



Usually a syncline is much more stable and 
permanent than an anticline. The strata in- 
stead of being stretched out, cracked and fis- 
sured have been squeezed together. This is il- 
lustrated over and over again in mountain ranges 
and sometimes in the California coast ranges. In 
the Appalachian chain each hill is a sj'ncline 
and the valleys between them are anticlines. This 
happens so frequently that almost every range 
of mountains furnishes examples. This structure 
is shown in Fig. 19. 

In the coast ranges south of San Francisco it 



is different. The chain of hills or mountains 
are formed by anticlines and the valleys by syn- 
clines. When faulted the portion along the faults 
have sometimes been eroded, showing a meta- 
morphir core. 

Now the reasons that the anticlines have not 
been worn clown is because the uplift of the for- 
• mation if, geologically speaking, very recent and 
because of the scarcity of rain in the southern 
part of California for very many years. This 
structure is shown in Fig. 18. 

The Coast Ranges are principally composed 
of strata belonging to the Tertiary period. The 
geologically upper strata is generally Pliocene. 
Therefore their elevation has occurred since that 
period. They are highly fossiliferous and the 
shells generally belong to the living genera and 
many of the species still survive in the waters 



part of the strata are reversed in position, the 
older strata then overlies the younger. A mea- 
surement of the rocks dipping away from these 
metamorphic cores show in some places that they 
were at one time covered by over 10,000 feet 
of sedimentary rocks. Sometimes denudation has 
been sufficient to expose the metamorphic core, 
while at other times the condition of the over- 
lying rocks show evidences of metamorphic ac- 
tion below. 

As the metamorphic rocks of the Coast Ranges 
are not exposed to any great extent it is impos- 
sible to tell to what depths these rocks extend. 
In manv instances they are underlaid by pseudo- 
volcanic rocks. 

The occupation of stream or anticlinal valleys 
by ocean esteros are an indication of subsidence, 
but the occupation of a synclinal valley made 
by the folding of strata is not an indication of 
subsidence. Nearly all the valleys of the Coast 
Ranges and valleys occupied by esteros or bays 
are synclinal valleys. When these valleys are 
o filled with an arm of the sea it is evidence that 
they have not been lifted sufficiently high to. es- 
cape being flooded. 




Fig. 16 is a transverse section through A B. Fig. D is faulted and fissured, fossiliferous marine 
strata underlying the impervious clays and muds of the tule lands. This filling of the San 
Pablo Bay acts as a cover for the conservation of water containing natural gas. 



bordering the adjacent coast, thus indicating no 
material change in the climate since the beginning 
of the Tertiary period to the present time. And 
if gas was formed from the mollusca of that 
period it would be formed from the mollusca of 
the present time, as all the conditions are the 
same now as then. Mollusca of the present dav 
are never found changing to petroleum oil or 
gas. 

It is plain that in the main the strata of the 
anticlines and the upthrow of the faults were 
uplifted to their present angles by the elevation 
of the metamorphic mass which forms the core 
of the anticline or occupies the fault. The strati- 
fied rocks dip away from the metamorphic rocks 
except when the uplift has been so great that 



The faults in the Coast Ranges southwest of 
the great .valley cannot have been made by the 
subsidence of this valley, as their upthrow is al- 
ways on the side of the fault, which is towards the 
valley. In many instances the upthrow amounts 
to over 500 feet. The strata on the upthrow 
side of the faults dip at high angles towards 
the valley, while the strata on the downthrow 
side of the faults dip away from the valley at a 
much smaller angle than the upthrow side. The 
force elevating this part of the Coast Ranges must 
has been tangential to their strike and exerted 
on the southwest side of the Coast Ranges, which 
was resisted by the Sierra Nevada range on the 
northeast, resulting in the uplifting of the Coast 
Ranges. The pressure which uplifted the Coast 




Fig. 17 is an ideal longitudnal section of the Sonoma Valley, near its mouth in the Tule lands, show- 
ing marine strata dipping towards the south and which is covered with debris from the 
Sonoma creek. 



PACIFIC Oil REPORTER 



th the white lines 
I 5. 

In thr l'.'.im Ranges the following mineral* 
have hern vaporized amidst the heat of the earth* 
. mercury, sulphur. h> . 1 • 
'l>per. et. ended 

and condensed in I cooler tone 
ami then in solution <>r otherwise with numer 
mis minerals, liquids and gases have been car- 
ried tu. nr near the earth In many 



ninety fee'. 1j the ivati r in I ■ 

ed a»d kept out bj irtil 
can be done, this well would vield many hun 
dreds of thousands o 

Wells acting similar to the above well have 
been found in main places throughout the Stato 
of California. 

The Live ley in Alameda county is 

iphically and geologically peculiarly situ- 
ated. All the water falling on the drainage area 



f: 







TffANSve/esf secr/o/v thkouch fwe cuhst rances calif 

Fig. 18 shows structure of Coast Ranges; E, core of anticline occupied by granitic rocks; F, core 
of anticline occupied by serpentinous and jaspideous rocks. This anticline is faulted, the 
dip on the upthrow side being steeper than the dip of the downthrow. G, core of anticline 
occupied with metamorphic rocks; the inticline is faulted, the dip on both sides having been 
at high angles; H, anticline, which is not faulted and shows no altered rocks. 



fissured faults these minerals are still ascending 
in California. 

Santa Rosa, Sonoma and Napa valleys were 
created hy faulting. The faults are generallv 
on the eastern side of the valleys and run parallel 
with the valleys. In Napa and Sonoma and the 
southem part of Santa Rosa valley the flow of 
surface and subterranean water is towards the 



of this valley must either by surface or subter- 
ranean flow pass through Nilcs canyon. Niles 
canyon cuts through many faults and fissures. 
Through these fissures natural gas and petroleum 
oil are constantly ascending and as the anticlines 
and fissures along their line of strike dip towards 
Niles canyon, water with natural gas or free 
gas can be obtained. Everything points to the 




USUAL STRUCTURE OF MOUNTAINS AN D VALLEYS 



southeast. This subterranean water coming in con- 
tact with the gas ascending through the fissures 
in the faults absorbs it. This water charged with 
l;is is carried through porous strata, which act 
as conduits and reservoirs, beneath the tule lands 
on the northern shore of San Pablo bay. The 
friction ; n the formation and the waters of the 
bay oppose the flow of this subterranean water 
so that when a well penetrates the porous strata 
lying below the impervious clays upon whic'i 
the tules grow, artesian wat"'' carrying gas is 
obtained. The fissured faults also extend be- 
neath the tule lands; natural gas ascending 
through these fissured faults below the impervious 
muds and days, impregnate the underlying water. 
Natural gas is found in wells throughout these 
hay. If ""he small natural flow of these gas 
wells were increased to a large flow of water by 
artificial means, many millions of feet of gas 
could be obtained. As this gas is on tide water 
of San Pablo bay and near the most populous 
part of the State of California, it will be of great 
value for manufacturing and other purposes. 

The La Brea creek on the Sisquoc rancho, 
Santa Barhara county, runs over a fissured fault 
for about one mile, and for this distance through 
the water of the creek natural gas ascends in 
hundreds of places, which can be lit with a 
match. To the writer's knowledge this gas has 
acted the same way for twenty-five years and 
has probably done so for thousands of years, ever 
since the formation was fissured. A well was 
bored on the banks of the creek from which 
water and inflammable gas flowed and is now 
flowing. When the well was drilling and the 
water kent agitated and bailed, the gas would 
accumulate under high tension near the bottom 
of the well and would at intervals throw the 
water from the well to a height of eighty or 



fact that natural gas to the extent of many mil- 
lions of feet should be obtained between the 
towns of Plensanton and Sunol, provided wells 
are drilled in the right places and systematically 
operated. To the southeast the drainage of the 
valley extends thirty miles. In this drainage area 

LEGENB 



aoo&o a o o oO o 050 

oooooooooooooo 

a/>oo 00000 o f » " 



CONGLOMERATE 



SHALE 



SAMDSTONE 



8ITUMIN/ZED SAND 






SERPENTINOUS 
Vx/V.-X/p/^/h 



M ETA M ORPHIC 



V- < V I > U T> 



GRANITIC 



Sg 



LIMESTONE 

^Sl 



(fe*«lS i 5jlftr 



Jilt 






ALLUVIAL. 



are numerous seepages of oil and exhalatio 
natural gas. 

Within a radius of twelve miles of this 



and ; 

m the 

•I in future p. 



The Most Prolific Oil Well 

in Roumania 



iallj tran latei n the Moniteur du 

Petrole Rnumatn.) 
Public attention in Roumania has been centered 
on will No. iii in Campina, the property of the 

1 Romana Company, which is considered 
the richest well in Roumania. The work of drill- 
ing this well was especially diffii 
a scries of obstacles, such as salt water, Hoods, 
cave-ins, etc., continuing most of « the time the 
drilling was in progress and greatly hindering 
the drillers. But thanks to the skill of the opera- 
tors ami a large stock of patience they overcame 
ail difficulties . 

On the 24th of last September at half-past 4 
o'clock in the afternoon the drill penetrated the 
bed of petroleum at a depth of about 1,150 feet. 
Immediately there was a terrible outburst, the 
equal of which was never before seen in Rou- 
mania. From a well casing of about 12 inches 
in diameter the well burst forth with a frightful 
rush of oil, sand and stones to a height of 300 to 
350 feet from the ground, inundating all the 
country round about for 500 to 700 yards. 

Surprised and entirely unprepared for such an 
extraordinary eruption, the director of the Steaua 
Romana immediately suspended operations in all 
his Campina works, called together all the work- 
men to the number of more than 300, and set 
them at throning up earth winks to retain the 
crude oil which was- gushing furiously from the 
well. 

The eruption lasted 16 hours, from half-past 4 
on Tuesday to half-past 8 on Wednesday morn- 
ing. They installed electric lights, by which it 
was possible for the 300 workmen who weri 
lectiog and retaining the oil to work all night. 
During the first eruption the well threw out 
more than one thousand wagons of stones, sand 
and oil. The surface soil round about absorbed 
a large quantity of petroleum. The flood of oil 
went down the highway and the banks on either 
side of the road formed dikes, as it were, between 
which the oil was confined until it could he 
pumped into tanks. During Tuesday night they 
pumped only 100 wagons, and on Wednesdaj 
afternoon, after the eruption had ceased, th 
covered another hundred wagons of oil which 
flowed out of the sand and stones that had gushed 
from the well. After the eruption ha.! ceased the 
well was completely covered with a mass of 
stones, sand and oil heaped up in a diameti 
2 i feet. 

After the well was cleaned out it began to 
at the rate of 125 wagons a day, and up t< 
evening of the 17th of October it had produced 
600 wagons of crude petroleum. If we calculate 
that the Steaua companj receive in round fi 

i per wagon, the production rep- 
I. In an inter- 
val, then, of seven days, if we count on only the 
see that this well has 
ed 60,000 francs pei da ; 100). The 
cost of the well was reimbui uction 

of a single day. 



PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 



Eastern Developments in 
October 



The operations in the Eastern petroleum pro- 
ducing States during the month of October 
showed a further decrease, due to the rather un- 
satisfactory results attending efforts to establish 
extensions of productive areas or to discover new 
pools. The activity of the driller has also been 
restricted by the decreasing area available which 
may be regarded as productive, the land within 
defined limits being practically all under lease 
and being pretty thoroughly exploited. The aver- 
age production of the October wells, at the prices 
prevailing, may be regarded as affording a mod- 
erate return to the driller fortunate ei.ough to 
possess leases within the productive sections, but 
in most instances where it has been sought to 
extend the productive area the efforts have proved 
abortive, while wild cat operations in the hope 
of discovering a new pool have been almost uni- 
formly disastrous. To these efforts is due the 
increased oercentage of dry holes, the percentage 
during October being higher than that of any 
month since last February. A considerable pro- 
portion of the wells classed as dry, however, 
were producers of gas and many of these proved 
to be profitable investments, and consequently 
aided materially in making the business profit- 
able, as wells showing no oil, but having a good 
gas pressure and being favorably located, may 
show better returns to the drillers than they 
would were they average producers of oil. The 
production of the October wells showed a fur- 
ther decline, but the average was slightly higher, 
due to some good wells brought in in West Vir- 
ginia. As the weather has been unusually favor- 
able of late, development work has been prose- 
cuted wherever there has been encouragement 
by favorable results, and in West Virginia espe- 
cially the new rigs in course of erection show a 
considerable increase. The latter developments, 
however, have not confirmed the expectations of 
the extent of the productive area or of its ca- 
pacity, while the larger wells which have prompt- 
ed the drillers to make new locations have shown 
rapid decrease in production. The field report 
for the month, taken as a whole, cannot be re- 
garded sn bullish as was expected, although the 
decrease <n the number of wells completed and 
of new oroduction are strong features, and the 
considerable decrease in drilling wells shows 
that unusual efforts were made during October 
to push the work to completion ; but, on the 
other hand, there is shown an increase in new 
rigs in course of erection, though these are for 
the most part within defined limits. It is not 
believed orobable that these indicate an increase 
in completions as much will depend upon weather 
conditions, nor is it expected that the results 
during the current month will show any impor- 
tant imnrovement. 

The total number of wells completed during 
the month of October in the States of Pennsyl- 
vania, New York, West Virginia, Ohio and In- 
diana was 1,500, showing a decrease, as com- 
pared with the number completed during Sep- 
tember, of ninety-three. The daily production 
of these wells at the close of the month was 
17,829 barrels, which shows a decrease of 970 
barrels. Of the total number of wells com- 
pleted 325 were unproductive (either dry or gas 
wells), this being an increase of fifty-eight in 
the number of failures to find oil, the percentage 
over twenty-one and a half, while last month 
the percentage was less than seventeen. The 
average daily production of the October wells 
was eleven and seven-eighths barrels, showing a 
slight improvement over the average of the Sep- 
tember wells. The number of wells drilling at 



the close of the month was 1,229, showing a de- 
crease of 104. The number of rigs in course 
of erection was 571, which is an increase of 
eighty-two and makes the total decrease of new 
work under way twenty-two wells. 

Following is a tabulated statement of the 
progress in development work in the Northern 
fields since the opening of the present year : 
COMPLETED WORK. 

Wells Av'ge 

Completed. Dry. Prod. 

January 1,165 203 10.70 

February 952 212 11 . 90 

March 1,133 225 10 . 61 

April 1,248 260 10 . 42 

May 1,377 271 10.07 

June 1,687 330 10 . 90 

July 1,606 283 ■ 11.81 

August 1,673 309 12.49 

September 1,593 267 11.79 

October 1,500 325 11.88 

NEW WORK UNDER WAY. 
Wells Rigs 

Drilling. Building. Total 

January 1,365 700 2,065 

February 1,380 715 2,095 

March 1,300 676 1,976 

April 1,322 674 1,996 

May 1,387 680 2,069 

June : 1,453 712 2,165 

July 1,488 606 2,094 

August 1,382 581 1,963 

September 1,333 489 1,822 

October 1,229 571 1,800 



tributed their share to early development of one 
of the most important oil fields in this country 
and so, in a measure, made possible the present 
results that are being achieved there and the fu- 
ture prosperity of that sections. 



Some Eastern Gas Notes 



Does Petroleum Producing 
in Texas Pay 



If it is seriously asked whether the vast sums 
of money invested in oil wells and equipment are 
returned to the investors as profits, the candy 
answer must be in the negative. Millions of dol- 
lars have been sunk in oil well ventures that have 
never returned a single dollar of "profit on the in- 
vestment," and millions more have been spent in 
developing oil fields for which no adequate return 
proportioned to the expense and risk has been re- 
ceived, though moderate devidends may have been 
made. In the aggregate the development of oil 
fields is an excellent investment, productive of 
great wealth to the country at large, but from 
the standpoint of the individual investor the busi- 
ness will always be of a highly speculative nature. 

It is estimated that for every barrel of oil pro- 
duced in the Texas and Southwest petroleum dis- 
tricts at least one dollar has been invested in 
land, wells or equipment. In the early days of 
the Texas fields oil was sold at 3 to 5 cents per 
barrel. Even now the price is below 50 cents. 
The oil is being sold at 50 per cent less than the 
aggregate cost of the development by which its 
production was made possible. According to the 
most expert estimates of cost and production, 
the Texas oil fields have produced about 50 mil- 
lion barrels of oil since January 1, 1901. The 
investment in oil wells, tanks, pipe lines and in 
defunct as well as successful oil companies during 
that time cannot be less than fifty million dollars. 
The actual cost of the wells and equipment fig- 
ures , up nearly forty millions. The estimate of 
one dollar per barrel as the investment so far 
required in the Texas fields is therefore not far 
from correct. From the standpoint of quick re- 
turns this investment has not been profitable to 
the aggregate investors. As a permanent contri- 
bution to the vested wealth of the State, it has 
been and will continue to be highly profitable. 

Fortunately, the large amount of capital neces- 
sary for oil development on such an extensive 
scale as that of the Texas fields is now available. 
Twenty or thirty years ago it would not have 
been possible to command fifty millions dollars for 
such a purpose. Now the money is in the banks, 
the savings of many people, and the fever of 
speculation is easily excited by stories of great 
gushers and quickly made fortunes in oil. Those 
investors in Spindle Top oil companies who failed 
to receive anything more valuable than their ex- 
perience in return for their investment may con- 
sole themselves with the thought that they con- 



The following descriptions of gas springs 
in the State of New York are taken from a num- 
ber of different authorities. 

Similar gas springs exist in California and 
many other States of the Union. 

A locality occurs in the town of Northeast, 
in the county of Duchess, where from the bottom 
of a small lake proceeds inflammable gas. A 
short distance from Ameniaville, in this county, 
the same gas rises from the bed of a small stream. 

In New Lebanon county of Columbia one or 
two similar springs have been observed. 

Inflammable gas is quite abundantly evolved 
through a boring made into the slate in the south- 
ern part of the city of Albany. The gas which 
issues from the Albany springs burns with a 
white flame tinged with red and at length when 
the flow of gas is temporarily impeded the flame 
is of a blue color, probably owing to imperfect 
combustion. 

Carbureted hydrogen gas issues through a crag 
or gravelly soil about a mile west of the village 
of Vernon in Oneida county, it issues through a 
spring of water at the rate of a gallon in a min- 
ute. It also issues from several masses of water 
along the foot of the same hill, which naturally 
induced a belief that it rises from the earth in 
all parts of several acres of ground adjoining the 
chief spring. 

In Yates county, a mile or a mile and a half 
from Rushville, on the southern side of a valley 
called Federal Hollow, there are numerous jets 
of this gas in a field near the northern extremity 
of this tract and at an elevation of forty or fifty 
feet from the bottom of the valley several hillocks 
may be seen of a few inches in height and from 
two to ten feet in diameter. They consist of 
black mould and are destitute of vegetation. 
From these gas issues and on digging into the 
earth beneath it may be obtained in considerable 
streams. In very cold weather the gas is said to 
issue from the tops of hollow cylinders of ice, 
sometimes two or three feet in height forming 
when lighted on a still evening a beautiful illumi- 
nation. 

In Monroe county, in the town of Riga, inflam- 
mable gas rises from a spring in sufficient quan- 
tities to supply a constant flame from a half inch 
tube. 

In the town of Royalton, Niagara county, six 
and a half miles east of Lockport, carburated 
hydrogen issues from a basin on the south side 
of the Erie canal. The quantity which issued 
through the basin in one place exceeded a gallon 
a minute. This place was named Gasport. 

At Van Buren Harbor, on Lake Erie, four 
miles from Freedom, bubbles of inflammable gas 
may be seen rising through the water of the Lake 
in a calm, a rod or two from the shore. 

In Chattarangas county carbureted hydrogen 
gas escapes from almost all the waters, whether 
stagnant or otherwise. It is evolved in small 
quantities at the oil spring at Freedom. 

Carbureted hydrogen rises through several 
lime springs at Clyde, in Wayne county, also in 
the valley of Elk Creek, three and a half miles 
from the village of Delhi, Delaware county, and 
at La Grange in Stenben county. 

Wells drilled in the vicinity of these gas springs 
have generally proved unproductive in commercial 



PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 



They 

n ami when artesian > irl.lr.l but 
little 

rlurion with «atrr to form 

under high tension, cither frer or in solu- 
••'II o( the well to the 
the water. Coope 
would make wells drilled in the neighborhood of 
iramercially productive, as 
ning to the surface shows that the un- 
derlying water through which t; ids is 
ited with 5 



921. 
Drill and underreai 

Expansible well-drill, J. R. Griffith, Zion 
111.. 774.(171. 

Pump-piston, (I. M. Cote, Pittsburg, ami R. 
E. Mcl/lurc. Bellevue, Pa.. 774.U.I. 

Pumping lever, .1. E, Hudson, Toledo, Ohio, 
774.4 



RECENT I'M ' N rs 
The following recently granted patents of in- 
to the nil anil gas trade are reported ex- 
pressly tor 'I'm Pacific Oh, Reporter by J. 
\l. Nesbit, patent attorney, Park Building, Pitts- 
burg. Pa., from whom printed copies may be 
procured tor I 5 cents each : 

Well-drilling cable, A. C. Smith. Brookville, 
Pa.. 772,0 

Pumping jack. J. W. Knight, Bowling Green, 
Ohio. 772,418. 

Oil-well packer, f. F. Merritt. Bafcersfield, 
Cal.. 772.728. 

Stand-pipe connection for oil wells. J. A. 
Hooper. Southard, Pa.. 772, N '4. 

Fishing tool, A. H. Brandon, Pemberville, 
Ohio, 772,864. 

Pump, S. M. Fulton, Pomona, Cal., 772,880. 

System of pumping oil, R. J. Hoffman and E. 
H. Hollingshead, Bradford, Pa., 773,501. 

Apparatus for extinguishing fire in oil tanks, 
J. P. McCann, Philadelphia, Pa.. 773,884. 

Sucker-rod joint, E. B. Campbell, Bakersfield, 



Mr. II. S. Reavis in an article "Have the Oil 

Fields of Texas Fulfilled the Predictions of 
1901," recently appearing in the Petroleum 

ll'nrhl. says: 

III the three years and eight months u Inch have 
elapsed since the first well was brought in at 
Spindle 'Fop, this single pool has produced more 
than 33,000,000 barrels of oil. And all from an 
area not exceeding 225 acres — the size of an or- 
dinary farm! Additional pools. Sour Lake, Sara- 
and Batson — developed in the years 1903 
and 1904 — have swelled the total output of the 
southeast Texas district to 52,01)0,000 barrels, or 
2,184,000,000 gallons. Although Spindle Top 
has declined until the hundred wells operating in 
that field do not make make than 5,000 barrels of 
oil a day, the newer pools are supplying the de- 
ficiency, and the amount of oil above ground ex- 
ceeds 10,000,000 barrels. Only this week a well 
was brought in by the J. M. Guffey Petroleum 
Company at Batson. It produced more than 
6,000 barrels the first twenty-four hours. And 
across the State line at Jennings, Louisiana, 90 
miles east of Beaumont, six gushers have been 
brought in since August 4th, one of which is 
making 14,500 barrels of oil a day, and another 



.lav. The 
Is in the I 
leuni district in 

r number which have not yet I 
by the drill. I investment of more than 
00 in the Texas industry alone, by tl 
Struction of 444' ■■ miles of pipe lil 

pacirj oi steel, wooden ami 

refineries having a daily capac- 
fu "' l5 >°°0 i, -"'" , ls i il, and numerous 

other items, indicate the faith wh 
have in the permanencj and profitableness of the 
petroleum business in this section. The facts as 
they have been briefly given must form an affirm- 
ative answer t,, the querj : 'Have the oil fieli 
Texas fulfilled the predictions of 1901?'" 



The experiment of oiling a battleship at sea 
has just been made. The chicl feature of the new 
plan is that the battleship can remain on her 
course while taking in a fresh supply of liquid 
fuel. The battleship towed the nil vessel (the 
tanker Phospher, we believe) with a 6> 2 -inch 
wire hawser. A lighter wire had 200 yards of 
6-inch flexible wire hose suspended 'from it, fas- 
tened "every six feet. The hose was fixed to the 
net shelf and taken to the connection on the 
ship's side. While the battleship then continued 
on her course, the tanker pumped in the fuel, 
and, it is claimed, this can be done in any weather. 
The British battleships Mars and Hannibal carry 
190 tons of liquid fuel, and it is estimated that 
this quantity can be pumped in six hours. When 
steaming astern with the tow-rope attached the 
tanker reduces the speed of the battleship by one 
knot. 



Exports of Domestic Mineral Oil from the Pacific Ports of the United States during the month of September, 1904. 



Custom Districts 


Mineral, Crude 


Napthas, etc. 


Illuminating 


Lubricating 


Residuum 




Gallons 


ollars 


Gallons 

3 500 
243 

1 650 

4 767 


Dollars 

899 

39 

'37 

7'3 


Gallons 
35 540 
950 
?50 

' 303 666 


Dollars 

5 "3 

209 

57 

55 298 


G Ions 
1 C90 
50 
4 829 


Dollars 

113 

20 

1 297 


Barrels 


Dolloi' 




















JO 160 


1 788 


1 33° 5°6 


60 687 


5 969 


' 430 








735 000 






2 150 
8 799 


15 900 

4 727 
93o 


3 063 

9 474 
182 


3 806 

3 3co 
4" 


1 226 

1 J90 
266 












36 865 

















Reported expressly for the Pacific Oil Reporter by 
Department of Commerce and Labor 
Bureau of St tistics 
November 4, 1904 



O. P. Austin, 

Chief of Bureau 



Expitts of domestic Mineral Oil from the Pacific ports of the United States during the year ending June 30, 1904, and shlpmen s to 
Hawaii and Alas a 



Custom District) 



Puget Souud 

Son Diego 

San Francisco 

Shipments to Hawaii 
From 

Los Angeles . . . 
6an Francisco 

Shipments lo Aliska 
From 

Pnget Soun<l . . 
San Francisco . 

WilUm«lte 

Oregon, Oreg . 



Mineral, crude 



Gallons 
7 742 
966 

3 341 



I l8q 000 
18 497 190 



42 4C0 
1 974 000 



Dollars 

5*1 

9 

119 



45 800 
616 027 



3 623 

68 200 



Naptbas, etc. 



Gallons 
3 558 
1 f93 
81 870 


29s 


872 


'33 
182 


869 
565 



Dollars 

684 

94 

10 437 



35 893 



18 040 
33 8*8 



Illuminating 



Gallons 
28 733 
7 >68 
2 jo 194 



I 038 160 



230 095 

237 643 

2 640 

4 76o 



Dollars 
6 967 
1 37« 
45 446 



163 075 



52 375 

38 242 

443 

859 



Reported expressly for the Facific Oil Reporter by 
Department of Commerce and L%bor 
Bureau of Statistics 
November 3, 1904 



Lubricating 



Gallons 

72 OJ2 

2 594 

"i 53 2 



125 509 



14 bi 1 

18 374 

'39 



Dollars 
10 591 
1 140 

29 784 



46 185 



5 6 9 
5 999 

49 



Residuum, etc. 



DoIIhts 



'4 
16 



54 



O. P. Austin, 

Chief of Bureau. 



PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 



NEWS FROM THE FIELD 

Supplied by Our Regular Correspondents—Recent 
Developments in tne Great Oil Fields of the West 



COALINGA 



KANSAS 



Coalinga, CaL, Nov. 16, 1904. 
The M. K. & T. Oil Co., on the southwest 
quarter of section 8, township 20 south, range 
15 east, will clean out and put its well on the 
pump, as soon as it completes its water well, 
which it is now drilling, and nearly completed. 
The well makes several flows a day through the 
casing. The company has three sump holes that 
the well is connected into. She will make a good 
well as soon as she is put into shape. The com- 
pany is building No. 2 rig east of its No. 1 and 
is getting ready to build No. 3. Both wells will 
be drilling inside of thirty days. Very Heavy tim- 
bers are being put in the new rigs, knowing that 
it will be necessary to go deep for the oil. The 
company has a fine camp, and it looks as if it is 
going to do business right. 

The Guthrie Oil Co. on section 31, township 
19 south, range 15 east, is drilling No. 1 well at 
a depth of 1,323 feet with a good showing of 
oil. About 80 feet more will finish the well. 
The oil is 20 gravity. No. 2 is drilling at a depth 
of 1,100 feet, with the 10-inch pipe landed, and 
water shut off. No. 3 rig is building and will 
be spudding inside of ten days. 

The Maine State is drilling at 1,500 feet, car- 
rying the 8-inch pipe, with good showing of oil. 
It expects to .finish at 1,700 feet. H. B. Guthrie 
is drilling this well by contract. 

The Commercial Oil Co., adjoining the Maine 
State, has made no headway with its No. 4 well 
fcr the past six months on account of having lost 
a string of tools in hole. It has now got pasl 
the tools with pipe and is making good progress 
at a depth of 1,500 feet in good oil sand. No. 8 
well is drilling at 1,400 feet, and will finish in 
the next fifty feet. This will make a good well. 
The Peerless Oil Co., on the northwest quar- 
ter of section 22, township 19 south, range 15 
east, is drilling its No. 3 well at 200 feet. No. 
4 and 5 rigs building. 

Captain Wm. Matson, of the Coalinga Oil 
and Transportation Co., was looking over the 
field this week. He is contemplating starting 
the drill at once on his thirty-acre piece, adjoining 
the Peerless on the south. This is considered to 
be very rich territory. 

There is a rumor that the Coalinga Oil and 
Transportation Co. is going to build ten million- 
barrels tankage in this field. 

The Coalinga Oil and Transportation Co. 
will load its 'first steamer of oil this coming week 
at Monterey. The event will be celebrated as 
a holiday by the employes. 

There is a rumor that some of the companies 
in this field have been offered 25 cents for all the 
oil, 20 to 24 degrees gravity, that they can pro- 
duce in the next four years. Now there are only 
three companies in this field that could handle 
a contract of that size, and only one that would 
have use for such an amount of that gravity oil, 
it looks as if the surplus Coalinga oil is to put 
into the tanks at Bakersfield. Whether or not 
such an offer has been made by the P. C. O. Co. 
cannot be verified but the belief that Coalinga oil 
is to be pumped to Bakersfield to be put into 
the steel tanks there is rapidly gaining credence. 
In the event of Coalinga oil being pumped to 
Bakersfield the tanks there will doubtless be 
emptied into earthen reservoirs. 

Correspondent. 



Chanute, Kan., Nov. 15. — On Monday the 
Standard began paying for oil on the straight 
gravity basis and so far as the terms North and 
South Neodesha are concerned they are dead ones. 
Hereafter all oil purchased by the Standard in 
the Kansas-Territory-Oklahoma field will be paid 
for on the following scale: Oil grading 32 and 
better, 87 cents a barrel; 31V2 and better, 82 
cents; 31 and better, 77 cents; 30l/ 2 and better, 
72 cents; 30 and better, 67 cents; 29y 2 and bet- 
ter, 62 cents; 29 and better, 57 cents; 28l/ 2 and 
better, 52 cents; 28 and better, 47 cents. 

This is what the producers and promoters 
throughout the field have been fighting for since 
the development of the field first began and now 
that they have got it they are uncertain, that 
is, the producers are, whether it was what they 
wanted or not. The promoters in the Northern 
end of the field are the only people supremely 
happy. Ever since the first shipment of oil from 
a well in Kansas to the refinery at Neodesha 
there has been an arbitrary line drawn through 
this county just south of Chanute. All oil pro- 
duced north of that line was paid for at the 
rate of twenty cents a barrel less than the oil 
produced south it without regard to grade. Thus 
oil of 32 degrees gravity at Chanute was worth 
twenty cents a barrel less than 32 oil produced 
eight miles south of Chanute. The effect has 
been to turn the tide of investment to the south- 
ern end of the field. The man with money to 
could get the largest returns. The promoters 
in the southern end of the field took every ad- 
vantage of the differential and in all of their 
advertising the twenty cents played a conspicu- 
ous part. Now that the differential has been 
abolished and all oil of the same grade whether 
produced at Chanute or at Peru or Bartlesville 
will receive the same price. As the Chanute 
district is the best developed district in the en- 
tire field and the certainty of getting oil as well as 
the cheapness of drilling make it the most de- 
sirable, the opinion of all the promoters is unan- 
imous that the abolition of the twenty cents will 
put in the business naturally went where he 
result in great benefit to this as well as the Hum- 
boldt "district. 

So far as the producer is concerned in many 
cases the new scale means a loss to him. But 
the average returns to the field will be made up 
by the increase in the lighter grades. For in- 
stance there is a great deal of 32 oil produced 
cast of Chanute on what is known as the Mundy 
trend. The old rate for this oil was 67 cents 
per barrel, while under the new scale the opera- 
tors will get 87 cents a barrel. The companies 
on this trend are the Logan, Clermont, P. P. C, 
Northern Petroleum, Ideal, Garden City, Dia- 
mond, and others. To all of these companies 
the scale is a substantial advance. Companies 
in the north trend are rather doubtful as to what 
the effect of the scale on revenues will be. 

One place where the new scale hits hard is 
down in the Territory and Oklahoma districts. 
The oil at Red Fork grades 36 1 / - 2 and if paid 
for according to scale would be bring more 
than $1.15 a barrel, while the product of the 
Muskogee wells grades as light as 44 degrees 
and if paid for according to gravity would bring 



more than $2.00 per barrel, and yet they are in- 
cluded in the scale at the same rate as the 32 
degree oil produced elsewhere. A special price 
has been made for the Territory district here- 
tofore and no official announcement has been 
made of its discontinuance, so the operators are 
hoping that they will not be disturbed by the 
new schedule. 

After the quiet of the last three months there 
is more work going on all over the field. It is 
believed that the number of wells drilled this 
month will exceed the October report. Cor 
tracts for ten wells have been let at Chanute 
within the past three days and reports received 
here from all over the field are to the effect 
that money is again rolling into Kansas. 

And, by the way, the October report shows 
a daily productive capacity for the Kansas and 
Territory field of at least 30,000 barrels of oil 
a day. This is an annual production of 9,000,000 
barrels, with the present number of wells. With- 
out the great preparations now being made by 
the Standard to take care of it, there would be 
a flood of oil which might still further affect 
prices. But the two refineries of the Standard 
at Neodesha and Kansas City have a daily ca- 
pacity of 7,500 barrels and the new pipe line to 
Whiting, Ind., from Kansas City, now building, 
will have a daily capacity of more than 28,000 
barrels. The facilities have allayed the fear of 
overproduction for many months at least. 

The organization of the Associated Oil Com- 
panies at Kansas City is the biggest development 
step which has been taken since the Standard 
began to take an active interest in this field. 
The Associated Oil Companies is a consolida- 
tion of more than one hundred oil and gas com- 
panies in Kansas and the Territory with a cap- 
ital of $3,000,000. It begins business with an 
acreage of more than 350,000 acres oil and gas 
lands, a daily oil production of between 5,000 
barrels and 6,000 barrels, and a daily gas pro- 
duction of more than 250,000,000 cubic feet. 
A. P. McBride, of Independence, Kan., is presi- 
dent, and J. J. Heim, of Kansas City, is to be 
chairman of the board of directors. The main 
office of the company will be at Kansas City, 
with branch offices at Paola, Chanute, Inde- 
pendence, Cherrs'vale, Coffeyville, Peru, Bar- 
tlesville, Muskogee and other places. All of the 
capital stock has been taken. Although the pro- 
moters of the company are reticent about their 
plans, it is said to be their intention to construct 
refineries for the handling of their own product 
and pipe lines both for oil and gas. The com- 
pany was promoted by Colonel John F. Mundy, 
of Chanute. It is the most ambitious project yet 
organized by independent operators. The peo- 
ple behind the enterprise have ample capital to 
carry out any plans they may think for their ad- 
vantage and the future movements of the com- 
bination will be watched with real interest by 
all the operators in the field. 

W. H. Dildine, one of the most prominent 
operators in the Northern end of the Kansas 
field, has just returned from an extensive trip 
to New York and other Eastern cities. He 
says: "I found that the people with money had 
been reading the papers and they knew as much 
about the Kensas field as some of us. I also 
found plenty of money for investment and my 
judgment is that as soon as the election smoke 
has cleared away, we shall be doing as much 
business in this district and in fact all over the 
field as we have ever done at any time since the 
development of the field began. All the prejudice 
agairfst Western investments, which obtained so 
strongly in the East at one time, has died away, 
and the people are beginning to realize the op- 






I inker* 
arnl • ; that the 

n now thai 
in the history i 

■ ris existing 
in the devel- 

opment has heen so rapid .is to be almost incred- 
ihlc. but the Nc» Vorkers had been keeping 
up with it and they believe, as «p tlo. that not 

field in the 
country, hut that it presents the (unity 

for profitable investment. 1 look lor several big 
in the near future." 

\. T. Robertson. 



Report Extraordinary 



(Report No. 
To the Stockholders of Peerless Oil Company: 
u i;ss. 
Well No. 1. 
The production of this well has continued to 
increase until now its dailj production is about 
arrels per dav ; gravity 20 degrees to 22] i 
degrei 

Well No. :. 
Our field manager reports that he lias sue- 
in shutting off the water in this well and 
that it is certain to he a heavy producer. Its 
pumping begins to-da; and its product will be 
stated in future reports. 

Wells 3, 4 and 5. 

Well .? has been located about 400 feet north 
from No. 1 and its drilling is now in progress. 

Well 4 has been located about 426 feet east 
from No. 1 and a derrick is being erected. Its 
drilling will begin immediately. 

Well 5 has been located about 426 feet east 



x W dl be 

continued until 

R\l IMPRi 

Additions io the cookhouse ire in progress and 

the building of two new bunk | of :i 

sufficient number of cottages for our workmen 
been ordered. 

drilling of this property with three strings 

ols will be continued as long as sale can be 

found tor the oil produced; and it is believed that 

it will he found necessary to continue drilling 
until at least twelve wells are completed. 
SALES OF (HI.. 

u the sale o 
of the \a!ue of $ to be produced and de 

livered from this property during the period oi 
ears beginning January 1, (90S, an average 
of about 1,500 barrels per day. It is likely that 
this contract can he tilled from the product of 
hree or at most four wells. 

At present there is an opportunity for addi- 
tional sales of oil and it is to meet these addi- 
tional sales that instructions have been given for 
the drilling of additional wells. 

It is believed that not less than $1,000,000 
worth of oil can be produced and delivered from 
the property during the above named period of 
In c j ears. 

EXERCISE OF OPTION'. 

This Company has exercised its option to pur- 
chase the 160 acres known as the Coalinga-Peer- 
less property and has paid $30,000 on the pur- 
chase price, the entire purchase price being $130,- 
000. The remainder of such purchase price will 
become due and payable, $25,000 on February 
15, 1005, $25,000 on May 15, 1905, $25,000 
on August 15, 1905, and $25,000 on November 
15, 1905. ■ 

FINANCIAL PLAN" COALINGA-PEERLESS OIL COM- 
PANY. 
In order to obtain a ready fund for the pur- 



ind equipment 
termincd In the board <c 

know n 
Ml lei ■ '1 Company 

corporation has always been oi on the 

basis i shares of the pa 

each. This .on-, an- i s to retain in it, 

treasury one-hali these shares, namely, I 

shares, for the lis!; it has taken and as its profit 
on the transaction; and the remaining II 
shares are to be sold at the uniform pi 
pel share (miles, at some time before all of said 
■hall have been sold the board of 
directors shall determine to increase i 
the unsold shares). The proceeds of such sales 

with the proceeds oi the oil to be produ- ed and 

sold from said property, are to he applied (1) in 
completing payment of the purchase price; (2) 
in reimbursing this company (Peerless) for the 
amounts it has advanced toward the purchase and 
equipment of said property; and (3) in further 
development and equipment. 

It will be noted that the above sum of $200,- 
000 added to the sum of $100,000 to be derived 
from the sale of oil during the year 1905, aggre- 
gates the sum of $300,000, which is an ample 
sum for the purposes indicated, as the Coalinga- 
Peerless Oil Company is likely to begin the pay- 
ment of dividends as early as January, 1906. 

It is probable that during the year 1905 the 
sum of $300,000 just named will be augmented 
largely by sales of oil additional to the oil to be 
applied on the above named contract. 

It will be observed that the number of shares 
of Coalinga-Peerless stock offered for sale, name- 
ly, 100, 1100 shares, is the same as the entire num- 
ber of shares of the capital stock of Peerless Oil 
Company; and each Peerless Oil Company share- 
holder will be permitted to purchase a number 
of shares of Coalinga-Peerless stock equal to the 
number of shares of Peerless stock held by him. 



100 PER CENT ADVANCE 



An advance of not less than 100 per cent will be made on Duchess 
stock within a few days. The allotment of 100,000 shares was oversub- 
scribed. The second allotment of 50,000 shares is almost gone. 

Investors wdio reserved blocks of stock by wire and then investigated, 
in every instance took the stock. Orders as high as 10,000 shares have 
been filled by wire. Shrewd investors realize that Duchess stock at five 
cents per share is the best investment to be had in any company at any price. 

A full description ad may be found in this paper on page 15, issue 
of November 5th. 

The land of the Duchess Company is proven. The management is 
of the best and has been endorsed by a great number of the best oil and 
mining papers. A GOOD PAYING WELL WAS FOUND IN THE FIRST SAND, 
at the depth of 800 feet. The oil was temporarily cut off. They are now 
drilling for the second sand. The well is over 1,200 feet deep in sandy 
shale carrying much oil and tremendous gas pressure. The SECOND SAND 
WILL MEAN A BIG PRODUCTION OF 55 CRAVITY OIL THAT SELLS AT $3 
per barrel. When the well is finished we look for the stock to go to $1 
or more per share. The Duchess will be our next dividend-payer. Let 
us tell you about it. Write or wire for particulars. You had better vv ire 
and have a block of stock reserved. 

GOLDFlF.hr>. NEVADA, 

THE GREATEST GOLDFIELD DISCOVERED 

IN RECENT YEARS. 

We are receiving many inquiries and subscriptions from those who 
desire to aid in promoting the company mentioned below. Our general 



manager leaves for Goldfield this week to start work upon the property. 
If you help promote this company, you will get a large block of stock at 
bottom prices and a square deal. 

We are organizing a company to develop a first-class property at Gold- 
field, Nevada. We will soon have 100 subscriptions of $100 each. Ten 
thousand dollars pays for the property with no indebtedness against the 
company and sufficient cash to start work. Half of the shares to be placed 
in the treasury. The other half will be divided among the promoters in 
even proportion to the amount of money invested. Parties putting in more 
than $100 will receive their pro rata of the shares. We will sell the 
treasury* shares to carry on rapid development. Here is a chance to get in 
at bottom prices. We subscribed $1000 and our friends within a few h 
subscribed $3000. We will have the full $10,000 within a few days. 

Join this promotion and get shares at the organization price. Company 
will be handled by competent business men of San Francisco. 

LOOK INTO THIS BEFORE YQU BUY ANY GOLDFIELD 
STOCKS. 

DEBENTURE SURETY COMPANY cm 



Rialto Building, San Francisco, Cal. 



Use the Wires. It Pays. 



10 



PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 



This privilege, however, cannot be extended 
longer than to include the 15th Jay of Decem- 
ber, 1904, from and after which date the unsold 
shares, if any there be, will be sold without re- 
serve, "first come first served." 

Excepting in respect of the above named reser- 
vation in favor of Peerless stockholders, all ap- 
plications for stock will be filled in the order in 
which they are received; but no order for -stock 
will be entertained unless accompanied by check. 

Under the arrangement just described, the 
president of this (Peerless) company is individ- 
ually entitled to the privilege of purchasing 53,- 
000 shares ; but this privilege is waived by him as 
to 28,000 shares, which shares (28,000) will be 
sold without reserve, to outsiders as well :.s to 
stockholders. 

CERTAINTY OF VALUE. 

The incorporation of Coalinga-Peerlcss Oil 
Company has been postponed until the value of 
its territory has been fully demonstrated, by its 
own wells 1 and 2, by a new well of the Cali- 
fornia Limited near its S. W. corner, by the 
Octave well near its S. E. corner, by the Avon 
well to the northeast and by the wells of the 
Saner Dough and Caribou Companies on the 
south ; and also until the making of a contract 
which gives its stock a definite and certain value. 

It will be noted further that the $500,000 
contract above referred to and the proceeds of the 
sales of the 100,000 shares of its stock offered at 
$2.00 per share, furnish a capital of $700,000 
with which this company begins its operations. 

Respectfully, 

John M. Wright, 

President. 
San Francisco, Cal, November 15, 1904. 



The Roumanian Petroleum 
Industry 



The great activity of the Roumanian petroleum 
industry, which means to interest foreign capital 
in its business has already made itself perceptible 
in an increase of the production, and many new 
establishments which they have built will cer- 
tainly not fail to cause an active development of 
the same. According to the Roumanian paper, 
Bursa, the production of the larger companies 
in Roumania amounts to the following: 

The Steaua Romana has a production of thir- 
ty-five wagons per day in Buschtenari and over 
eighteen wagons daily in Campina, together, 
therefore, fifty-three wagons per day aside from 
works in other smaller fields. The Internation- 
ala obtains an output of more than eighteen 
wagons daily in Gura Ocnitzei and Buschtenari 
and the Telega Oil Company, about seventeen 
wagons oer day. The Buschtenari Company 
maintains its former production of twenty wag- 
ons, but has prospects of increasing this quantity 
in consequence of the opening of two new wells, 
Nos. 7 ?nd 12. The national company Hagien- 
off et Campeano possess a production of about 
fourteen wagons per day and the Campina-Mo- 
reni recntly obtained in well No. 5 an extra- 
ordinary production, for at times there were 
eruptions which expelled from four to five wag- 
ons. 

Therefore if one takes only the present pro- 
duction of the larger companies as a basis the 
production of crude oil expected in a year's time 
is estimated at 4,600,000 meter centners, and a 
considerable increase of the same will be effected 
even if Hie operations of the new companies, 
among which is the Standard establishment, are 
not taken into consideration. The latter, which 
is known by the name American Roumanian 
Companv, has already begun to work earnestly, 
but here, as everywhere, goes very craftily. One 



Flow of Natural Gas 
Increased by . . . 

Cooper's Gas Lift 

Al*o flow of water 
op oil Increased and 
gas saved 

A. S. COOPER, C.E., 

219 Crocker Building 
San Francisco, Cal. 



AT A BARGAIN. 
Standard Drilling Rig with full equipment of 
small tools. Boiler and engine in first-class con- 
dition. Address Exchange No. 21, care this 
journal. 



The 

Madero 

Rancho 

Consisting of 1 6o acres in Monterey 
county, 25 miles from tide water, 7 
miles from Kings City. 

Excellent Indications of Valuable 

Oil Deposits 

Timber on the property for fuel pur- 
poses. Good water supply. En- 
dorsed by principal experts in the 
country as valuable oil land. Must 
be sold at once. Title in fee simple. 
MRS. G. G. MADERO, 
Room 32, 318 Pine St., San Francisco. 



WANTED — Position as Superintendent of an 
oil company. Thirty years' experience in 
Pennsylvania, Ohio and California. Best of 
reference. Address, 

"PETROLEUM," care this paper. 



We Promote, Finance and Incorporate 

Let us show you the advantages of incorporating your business or enterprise. 
If you need money to enlarge your business, permit us to secure it for you, by selling 
stock through our Eastern correspondents. 

CONSOLIDATED AUDITING COMPANY 

.307 to 310 Mills Building, San Francisco. 
Telephone Bush 849. 

WRITE US TO-DAY ! 
If you want to invest your money in a sound business proposition where you are sure 
to receive ten dollars for every one dollar invested 

BUY BUFFALO-CALIFORNIA OIL STOCK. 
This company is incorporated under a special act of Congress providing for the incor- 
poration of companies in the District of Columbia, making our stock absolutely non-assessable 
and non-taxable. We hold some of the most valuable oil property in the well known 

HALFMOON BAY DISTRICT, 
San Mateo County, California, 
Now possessing many fine oil wells producing 52° to 55° gravity oil. But we cannot tell it all 
here. Write us for full particulars. 

BUFFALO-CALIFORNIA OIL CO, 

Fletcher Block, 

Livermore, California. 



C. V. Hall Iron Works 

(LOCATION, OLINDA, ORANGE CO., CAL.) 

POSTOFFICB ADDRESS, Route No. 2. 
FULLERTON. CAL. 

Los Angeles Office, 222 Wilcox Building, 
LOS ANGELES, CAL. 

The C. V. H. Chain Tongs can be had through 
any dealer in oil well supplies. 

These tongs are made of the very best steel, 
in any size, and always give satisfaction. 

Manufacturers or users of chain tongs do so 
at their own risk, In any infringements of 
Patent No. 438,177, the ownership of 
which belongs to the undersigned. 

CHARLES VICTOR HALL. 




PACIFIC OIL REPORTKR 



must b .1 at what abundant 

untry 

in entirely different business principle. In 
the deeds "t convey- 

ii.i borrows the property nt the proprietors, 
not by 'lie means of money, hut through the re- 
very narrowly measured ^rn-~ per 
cent (u '•> 10 , whereby the drilling 

itions an- nut made am too severe. 

well known, the Roumanian- 
American Company tirst concluded a treaty with 
the European Petroleum CompttD) (the latter 
known in Roumania by the name William fow- 
ler), according to which it obtained the right 
to drain 'he earth oil territory belonging to the 
European Petroleum Company; at the same time 
it ha< rented the pipe line between Buschtenari 
and the station of Gageni, as also the reservoirs 
of the European Petroleum Company. The pre- 
liminary works for these drillings have already 
commenced and the steamer Mohican has ar- 
rived at Braila with its own drilling apparatus, 
as it contemplates operating with the Pennsyl- 
vanian cable drill. 

The Roumanian American made a further 
agreement with proprietor Simescu, in which it 
takes in 'ease about 500 joch of land encircled by 
Gageni Baicoi against an assurance of 7 per cent 
of the net gain in case of success. Upon a sim- 
ilar basis the American company will presently 
treat with a large land owner in Moldau rel- 
ative to a complex territory comprising 4,000 
hectares if it has not already finished such an 
arrangement. These latter transactions would 
be of verv great significance because the already 
acknowledged extensive fields of Moldau have 
remained completely unimproved and neglected 
for manv years since all the petroleum com- 
panies acting in the country have concentrated 
their entire boring activity upon the oil fields 
of the Prahova Valley. The Steaua Romana 
possesses a large petroleum exploitation in Mol- 
dau which comprises 6,000 hectares in Moinesti- 
Solonz, in a region where for more than fifty 
years the first Roumanian hand wells have been 
dug. 

In face of these the benefits which should 
develop through the invasion of Roumania by 
the Standard Oil Company scarcely permit them- 
selves to be discovered. The Standard intends 
to obtain the Roumanian wealth for itself with 
its own machines and implements and with its 
own people, almost to no purpose in foreign ter- 
ritory for what benefit therefor would the land- 
lord and the country have if the Standard should 
actually succeed in producing great quantities 
of oil from the Roumanian fields? None at all, 
or really immeasurable disadvantage, for with 
their Roumanian petroleum the Standard could 
make successful competition with the other na- 
tive or naturalized companies, and the various 
landlords would make a bargain as did Esau 
with Jacob. 

Since the German capital has recently been 



FOR SALE. 



Pinal ( >il stock at $3.60 per share, 
res Brookshire Oil stock at $1.00 per 
share. 

W. E. BARNARD, 

+ 7ii Tenth Street. Oakland, California. 



We manufacture the best 
lubricating oils for oil 
drillers 

KING KEYSTONE OIL CO., 
204 Front St., San Francisco. 



BARGAIN 

Complete Oil Rig for Sale 

Including two String Tools 
and Fishing Toole 

Over 3000 feet of casing In good condi- 
tion — some never used — sizes, 11?*, 
&H; 8 inch and 6 inch drive pipe 

The Above Property 
Cost Over $10,000 

and is for sale at a bargain 

Exchange No. 22 

Care this Publication 



the: 
KROHN 

WIRE ROPE SOCKET 

THE ONLY SOCKET USING A BALL CLUTCH 



LASTING QUALITIES UNEQUALLED 



PATENT 



CLUTCH 




DEVICE 






For Sale by ALL 

OIL WELL SUPPLY HOUSES 



/ 



LLEWELLYN IRON WORKS 

SOLE MANUFACTURERS 

LOS ANGELES, CAL, 

Write for Circular 




READING 



(IRON) 



Drive Pipe - = Casing = = Tubing - = Line Pipe 



IS THE BEST 



R. H. HERRON CO. 



509 MISSION STREET 

SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 



PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 



greatly interested in the Roumanian industry, 
the Holland has now begun to call back its old 
interest. It is a well-known fact that there 
were many Holland companies in Roumania, of 
which two have remained, the Internationala and 
the Aurora. Recently a new company, the Cam- 
pina Poiana, came into existence with a capital 
of 500,000 francs, which will relieve the old 
company Amsterdam and take over its drilling 
rights in Campina Poiana, comprising about 600 
ha. The oromoter of this company is Mr. Ger- 
brand O'ie, the Holland Vice-Consul and direc- 
tor of the existing Holland companies. Mi. Ger- 
brand Oh'e intends to occasion a further addi- 
tion of Holland capital to Roumania, and foi 
this purpose lie has drawn up a consular state- 
ment from which we will extract interesting 
data : 

"Since 1868 forty-five companies have been 
established in Roumania, with a capital of about 
120,000.000 francs, not including about 120 na- 
tive producers whose warehouse capital is not 
known. After various charges, liquidations and 
fusions "-he number of companies and separate 
producers on Jan. 1, 1904, amounted to about 
159, which together have a production of 3,- 
871,967 meter centners. Notwithstanding the 
fact that Hollanders have invested over 30,- 
000,000 francs in the Roumanian Petroleum 
Company — that is, about one-quarter of the en- 
tire capital — there falls to Holland companies 
only a production of 500,000 meter centners, 
therefore only one-eighth of the entire sum, 
which is derived chiefly through the largest Hol- 
land comnany, I'lnternationala. In the country 
there are sixty-five refineries, which annually 
work up 3,394,428 meter centners (but only in 
the year 1 903 ) ; the second largest of these, the 
Aurora, was purchased by the Internationala, 
which has its headquarters in Amsterdam. The 
export amounts to about one-half of the entire 
production." 

A French firm also, the house of Desmarais 
Bros., of Paris, has engaged in the Roumanian 
petroleum industry. This firm formerly rented 
a small refinery in Constanza and recently es- 
tablished a new company, Aquila Franco Ro- 
mana, with a stock capital of 3,000,000 francs 
and with headquarters in Bucharest. On the 
other hand, the Diskonto Company has appar- 
ently allowed its determination to build refiner- 
ies in Roumania to be entirely abandoned, as 
the conditions of the German capital in the Rou- 
manian petroleum industry have been with- 
drawn. The cause of this is to be found abso~ 
lutely in *-he decreasing agreement negotiations 
with Germany, unfavorable to the Roumanian 
petroleum companies, the conclusion of which 
can be of very far reaching importance to the 
further expansion of the enterprise in Roumania. 
— Naphta. 



CALIFORNIA STOCK AND OIL EX- 
CHANGE. 



The following were stock sales in the Cali- 
fornia Stock and Oil Exchange in the formal 
session held for the week ending Wednesday, 
November 16th: 

Associated Oil Co., Bonds — 

2,000 bonds at $ 87.50 

1,000 bonds at 88.00 

Associated Oil Co., Stock — 

5,000 shares at 26 

Caribou — 

100 shares at 5.50 

Chicago Crude — 

300 shares at 22 

Claremont — 

200 shares at . . . .82^ 

Four — 

400 shares at .54 

100 shares at 55 

Hanford — 

2 shares at 185.00 

Home — 

400 shares at .60 

100 shares at 61 

950 shares at 65 

Independence — 

1,100 shares at 32 



FRESNO COUNTY ABSTRACT COMPANY 

Incorporated Under the T_,aws of California January 21, 1901. 

Capital Stock $100,000.00 

FULLY PAID UP 

SEARCHERS OF RE CORDS AND CONVEYANCE 

Abstracts of Title Caref ully Compil ed at Reasonable Rates. 

NO. 1115 K ST., FRESNO, CAL. 



BARGAINS 



IN 



Secondhand Boilers and Engines 

Also Oil Well Casing, all sizes 

All in First-CIass Condition 

Address 

H. H. R. Care this Paper 



Real Estate 
Insurance 



Oil Lands 

N. L. PALMER 

NOTARY PUBLIC 
COALINGA, = - = = CAL 



ALWAYS FIRST 



Ever had trouble in getting the size 
of casing or drive pipe you needed? 



TRY USi 



We can help you. We carry ALL the regular 
sizes and the following specials: 

13^2 inch Boston " Diamond B" Casing 42 pounds 

12H " " " " 34 

10 " " " « 35 

9 s /s " " " " ......30^ 

8X " " " " 24^ 

7H " " " " 20 

6S /b " •' " " i 7 y 2 " 

s¥& " " " " i 7 

4* ' " '.'.'.'.'.'. 9 39 " 

7 " " Drive Pipe 23.27 " 

s " " " " 11 

5 14.50 

2 " " Tubing 4 ^ .. 

3 " " " sy 2 •' 

Don't you think we can suit you ? 

THE NATIONAL SUPPLY COMPANY 

Los Angeles, San Francisco, Bakersfield, 
Mc Kittrick, Coalinga, Santa Maria. 



PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 



. 14 

Monte 

il — 

.04 

rrnlcum — 

' ^S 

.3 

Strrlii' 

shares at 2.00 

Twenty-Eight — 

4 10 sham u 10 

1 share* at 11 



Follow ing arc the latest 
of oil companies listcil on 
and ( )il Exchange: 

Ape! !(i 

As.. ( til Co. Stk. Tr. Cer 


quqotations tor stocks 
the California Stock 

Bid. Asked. 

$ .4(1 $ .4.? 

.26 

.60 




.17 


.10 






6.00 


Central Point Con 


.72 
22 




Claremont 


.80 
.35 




Esperanza 


.8) 


1.50 
.20 


Fortv 


.40 


.50 




.54 






.23 




Hanfrord 


180.00 
.56 


■ p2 






.75 






17.00 




.30 




Junction 

Kern 


.14 

4.75 

. . 11.00 




IVIcKittrick 


.10 






.25 


.30 


Monte Cristo 


.75 


.80 

.45 




03 




Petroleum Center ........ 

Reed Crude 

S. F. & McKittrick 


.57 

2.00 

.72 


.58 

.05 

2.50 

3.00 


Sovereign 

Sterling 


.32 
2.05 


.04 


Thirtv-Three 

Toltec 


5.50 
?? 

.. 10.50 


1 5 . 00 






101 .00 


Wolverine 


.40 





NOTES. 



The Monte Cristo Oil Company is now pay- 
ing its regular monthly dividend of 1 cent per 
share on the capital stock of the company- 
amounting to $5,000. 

The assessment of 10 cents per share on the 
capital stock of Junction Oil Company, amount- 
ing tr> $25,000, is now delinquent. 

It is said that Standard Oil Company is now 
offering 15 cents per harrel for oil in the Kern 
river field. 

The Esperanza Oil Company on the 9th inst 
paid a regular monthly dividend of 1 cent per 
share on the capital stock of the company, 
amounting to $1,250. This is the fourth divi- 
dend paid by the company, which has three wells 
yielding about 20,000 barrels per month, for 
which a good price is had. The company pays 
one fourth royalty. 

"Col." Tim Spellacy, John M. Wright and 
John Page, manager of the P. C. O. pipe line, 
were in Coalinga during the week. 



WESTERN COOPERAGE CO. 

MANUFACTURERS OP 

STAVES and HEADING 

For Uolh Tight und Slu. I. Work. 



OUR SPECIALTIES ARE 



WhiteSpruceSaves and Heading Fir Tight Barrel Staves and 

all ready to set up for Fish, Heading lor Oil, Lard. Pork, 

Pickles or Lard packages ol Bee( C | C rj c 

any size. ' "ooo 

Fir Slack Barrel Staves and Heading for Asphalt, Lime 
Cement and Bottle Barrels. 



Prompt and Courteous Attention to all Inquiries. 



MILLS at Aberdeen, Wash, and Houlton, Ore. 



SMITH, EMERY & CO. 

CHEMICAL ENGINEERS 

TECHNICAL OIL WORK 



ANALYSIS OF 

Petroleum, Soluble Salts. 

Asphalt, Coal, Coke. 

Residues, Feed Waters, 

Snlphur. Drinking Waters, 

Gypsum, Minerals, Etc. 



Umpire Work on Oil Contracts. 
Chemical and Physical Laboratories. 



83-85 New Montgomery Street 
JV/rJV FRJtJVClSCO, CJtL. 



Lacy Manufacturing Company 



Manufacturers of 




Steel Water Pipe 
General Sheet 
Iron Works 
Oil Well Casing 
Oil Stills 

OIL STORAGE AND WAGON TANKS 

Works: Cor. New Main and Date streets, P. O. Box 231, Station C. 

Baker Block Telephone Main 196 

Office, 334 North Main Street. Los Angeles, gal. 

BATES' 

PATENT CASING TONGS 




1416-1426 19th St., Bakersfield, Cal. 



Fills a long-felt want. No more need of 
pole and rope for screwing up casing. Bates 
Tongs can be applied to the casing anywhere 
In driving or pulling without danger of Injury 
or parting casing. 

Set No. 1, with any two size jaws from 95^ 
to 13^ inches. 

Set No. 2, with any two size jaws fro-n 4 to 
g% inches. 




WARREN CITY^EOILE 

WARft 



r 4 



PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 



Captain L. Harris, of Fresno, is in Santa Ma- 
ria looking after his oil interests. 

Forty Oil Company, recently listed on the 
California Stock and Oil Exchange, has forty 
acres in its own right on NW. 54 of NE. 34 0I 
34-19-15, Coalinga, having one well 1,300 feet 
deep. Capital stock is $300,000, with 300,000 
shares of $1 each, the directors being T. G. 
Hart, president ; L. L. Corey, vice-president ; P. 
J. Clark, secretary; Frank Helms and Sam 
Shannon. The Bank of Hanford is treasurer. 

The Four Oil Company has declared a divi- 
dend of 1 cent per share on the capital stock 
of the company, amounting to $3,000, payable 
November 15th. 

The Phoenix Oil Company has secured a min- 
eral patent on the south one-half of the north- 
west one-quarter of the southeast one-qurrter of 
section 20-19-15, Fresno county. 

The Bay City Oil Company has been granted 
a mineral patent for the Selma Oil placer claims 
on the northeast one-quarter of section 22-32-23, 
Kern county. 

At a recent meeting of the directors of Home 
Oil Company, the regular monthly dividend of 
2 l /± cents per share was passed, and further divi- 
dends will not be paid until warranted by the 
financial condition of the company. Meantime 
an attempt will be made to increase the contract- 
ing production by drilling a new well. 

The Caribou Oil Company will pay its regu- 
lar monthly dividend of 7 cents per share today. 
The directors of the Claremont Oil Company 
have declared their regular monthly dividend of 
1 cent per share, payable December 1st. They 
will also pay an extra dividend of 1 cent per 
share on November 25th. 

The shipment of oil from the Point Richmond 
refinery reached the high water mark Thursday 
of last week, when the Standard Oil Company 
shipped forty-two cars of oil to various parts of 
the country. Of this shipment eleven cars con- 
tained refined oil and the remaining thirty-one. 
fuel oil. The profit on that day's work repre- 
sents a neat sum of money. 

For some time it has been known that there 
is a strong flow of natural gas from the artesian 
well at the soda works at Keeler. Superintend- 
ent Wrinkle has had a cap placed over the top 
of the pipe, which catches the gas. A half-inch 
stopcock on top of the tank emits a strong flow 
of gas, and when a match is applied, gives a 
flame which rises several feet in the air. An 
effort will be made to use the gas for illuminat- 
ing purposes about the works. The gas, which 
is held in solution in the water, is liberated by 
the flow of water from the well. 
is liberated by the flow of water from the well. 

Four men were seriously injured Sunday even- 
ing just after 7 o'clock by the explosion of a 
large quantity of natural gas in the Great East- 
ern quicksilver mine at Guerneville. The men 
had just gone into the mine and had hardly 
commenced work when they were hurled back- 
ward by the awful force of the explosion. Two 
of the men were so seriously injured that their 
removal to a San Francisco hospital was made 
necessary. 

These men were Rollo Hooten and James 
Leslie, and the full extent of their injuries can- 
not be foretold at present. Writhing in pain 
they were taken to San Francisco on the morn- 
ing train, attended by Dr. E. H. Byron of Guer- 
neville and Alfred Abbey, superintendent of the 
mine in which they were injured. The men were 
given every possible attention. 

The others who were injured were Fred Sicotte 
and Peter Vander Stratten. These men, while 
badly burned, escaped more fortunately than 
their companions. 



H 



PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 

is the only 

OIL JOURNAL 

Published on the 

Pacific Coast. 

It gives full, fresh and authentic oil news from 
all the oil districts, new and old. It exposes 
fraudulent oil companies. It gives the latest 
information on oil stocks and dividends. It 
describes the latest method of drilling wells, 
pumping, piping and storing oil; use of oil for 
road making, etc. 

It is the only paper which advocates the belie! 
that California's refined asphalt is the equal 
of Trinidad asphalt for paving and other pur- 
poses, and is in every way superior to bitumi- 
nous rock, the use of which has given San 
Francisco, Oakland and other California cities 
so many poor streets. 

The subscription price is $2.50 a year. If you 
are interested in any way in California oil, cut 
out the following coupon, fill in the blank lines, ' 
and send it, accompanied by check, money 
or express order to the 

PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 

318 Pine St. San Francisco 



Subscription Blank 



[I YEAR |2.gp 

6 MONTHS I.50 

3 Months 1.00 



for- 



Pacific Oil Reporter 

318 Pine Street San Francisco. 

Please enter my subscription to the PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 

— at$ 



Si£ced- 



Address- 



Date- 



PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 



Vol. 6. No. 4 



San Francisco, Cal., Saturday, Nov. 26, 1904 



Price Ten Cents 



PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 

Published Weekly. 

The Oil Authority of the Pacific Coast. 

Endorsed by California Petroleum Miners' Ass'n. 



MARIA R. WINN, Proprietor. 
E. S. EASTMAN, Editor and Manager. 



OFKICl AND EDITORIAL ROOMS 

318 Pine Street - - San Francisco, California 
Telephone, Bush 176. 



TERMS. 

On* Tesr J2 60 

SU Months 1 50 

Three Months 1 00 

Single Coplss 10c 

STRICTLY IN ADVANCE. 

Money should be sent by Postal Order, Draft or 
Registered Letter, addressed to Pacific Oil Reporter. 
SIS Pine Street, S»n Francisco, rooms 31-32-33. Com- 
munications must be accompanied by writer's name 
and address, net necessarily for publication, but as 
a guarantee of good faith. 

Entered In the Postofflce at San Francisco, Cali- 
fornia, as second class matter. 

Latest Quotations 



Following are the latest quotations for Cali- 
fornia crude oil at the wells: 



COALINGA. 



Gravity at 60° temperature. 
Oil of 22° up to but not including 24° . 



Oil of 24° up to but not 
Oil of 25° up to but not 



including 25°. 
including 26° . 



Oil of 26° up to but not including 27 



Oil of 27° up to but not 



Oil of 28° up to but not including 29 



Oil of 29° up to but not 



ncluding 28° . 



ncluding 30° . 



Fuel oil, 14 degrees gravity or better. 

KERN. 

Fuel oil, 14 degrees gravity or better. 



Prices 

per barrel. 

.20 
.30 
.35 
.40 
.45 
.50 
.55 
.15 



.15 



KANSAS-INDIAN TERRITORY. 

Oil of 32 degrees gravity $0.87 

Oil of 31 y 2 degrees gravity 82 

Oil of 31 degrees gravity 77 

Oil of 30J/2 degrees gravity 72 

Oil of 30 degrees gravity 67 

Oil of 29 J/2 degrees gravity 62 

Oil of 29 degrees gravity 57 

Oil of 28' o degrees gravity 52 

Oil of 28 degrees gravity 47 

EASTERN QUOTATIONS. 

Pennsylvania 1 .56 

Tiona 1.71 

Corning 1 -33 

New Castle 1.43 

North Lima 1-05 

South Lima 1-00 

Indiana 1.00 

Corsicana, light 85 

Corsicana, heavy 50 

Somerset 1 .01 

Ragland 60 

Petrolea (Ont.) 1.53 



Beaumont 35 

Sour Lake 35 

Saratoga 35 

Batson 33 



SANTA MARIA. 
Gravity at 60° Price per Barrel 

Temperature. at Port Harford. 

25 up to but not including 26° $ .50 

p to hut not including 21 ' 55 

_'7 up to but not including 28° 60 

28 up to but not including 29° 65 

29 up to but not including 30° 70 

30 up to but not including 31° 75 

31 up to but not including 32° 80 

and up 85 

RETAIL. 

Kerosene, Pearl, per gal., icj'^c; Astral, 
: Star, »9%c; Extra Star, 24c; Eocene, 
23c; Elaine, 26c; Water White, in bulk, 13c; 
do 150 deg., 13c; do, extra fine, 15c; Mineral 
Seal, iron bbls., 18c; wooden bbls., 2oy 2 c; do, 
cs., 24c; Deodorized Stove Gasoline, in bulk, 
:6c; do, in cs., 22l/,c; 86 deg. Gasoline, in bulk, 
25c; cs., 31c; 83 deg. Naphtha or Benzine, de- 
odorized, in bulk, per gal., 13c; do, in cs., I9 x /oc. 



If we may believe the newspaper reports now 
being circulated, the affairs of the wicked Stand- 
ard Oil Company are to be thoroughly overhauled 
and all its monster designs laid bare to an innocent 
but oppressed public. The Standard has, in the 
period of its existence, been charged with every 
known crime, from petty larceny to murder, in- 
cluding arson, highway robbery, burglary, and 
grand larceny. Many of these charges have been 
aired in the courts of the Eastern States, but we 
have yet to hear -f a conviction. Why? Be- 
cause bribery is included in the many charges 
against the octopus. Now the Chronicle charges 
it with injuring the manufacturing industries 
of the State and killing the many new processes 
of refining which have been introduced "as a 
result of which California stands lowest in the 
list of oil refining States." We suppose the 
process referred to is the one which was claimed 
to refine 50 per cent, of illuminating oils from 
Kern fuel oil which is on a par with getting 
"blood from a turnip." As to the manufacturing 
interests we would like to know who is profit- 
ting more by the low price of fuel oil. The rea- 
son that. California stands at the foot of oil refin- 
ing States is that although its total production 
of oil is greatest is production of refining oil is 
very low. However, we are glad that there is 
a likelihood of an investigation into the affairs of 
the corporation and we also believe that the 
corporation itself is well pleased. It will give 
Mr. Rockefeller's pet monopoly a lot of free ad- 
vertising and cost the government a "right 
smart" of money to expose the methods of doing 
business. Then the Standard will be soundly 
"spanked" and told not to do it again. 



Within the last five years, says Country Life 
in America, the California roadmakers have made 
rapid advancement from the first period when 
oil was used simply to lay the dust to a second 
and far more momentous one in which permanent 
roads are being constructed with it. The oiled 
road cost; about one and a half cents per square 
foot, while asphaltum costs fifteen cents, and a 
powdered granite road is nearly twice as expensive 
as the oil, where there is the same relative situa- 
tion as to material. Rubber tires are not injured 
by the oil road, as was claimed at first, and the 



surface dues not soften as asphali n ids do, and 
is not 50 easilj cut up by wagon tires. Indeed, 
it is said that oiled roads are the most important 
disco verj in road making for dusty countries that 
has ever been made. At present there arc about 
one thousand miles of these roads in California. 



When a high class mining company wants cap- 
ital tor development purposes, it puts its stock 
on sale by advertising in high class financial pub- 
lications. Promoters of high class propositions 
do not have to appeal to an ignorant class of 
petty investors who have no right to risk money 
in any enterprise that may prove a failure. Read- 
ers of high class financial papers are always hunt- 
ing high class investments. Financial advertis- 
ing of a questionable nature has no place in the 
advertising columns of first class publications. 
The advertising matter of questionable firms is 
refused and as a result these firms have to place 
their advertising matter in the general press of the 
country. The wise men seeking investments in 
mines will buy stocks that he finds advertised in 
the high class financial and mining papers of the 
country. But he will always investigate before 
investing. 



The oft-repeated advice given investors to in- 
vestigate before investing is a rule that every 
investor should strictly adhere to. Where full 
information regarding the financial and physical 
condition of the enterprise being investigated is 
not forthcoming, the investor should keep his 
money in his pocketbook. Investors should not 
put their trust in promoters or in the tools of 
promoters. If a statement is made regarding an 
enterprise, it is up to the investor to find out if 
this statement can be relied upon or in other 
words if the man who makes the statement tells 
the truth. If it is an expert who makes the re- 
port upon the physical condition of a property, 
investigate the standing of the expert. Investors 
should know that there are many kinds of experts. 
The young man just out of college is more liable 
to make mistakes than is the college graduate with 
the years of practical experience back of him. 
Graduates of mining schools are liable to make 
mistakes, but their mistakes are few and far be- 
tween as compared with those made by the man 
who pose as an expert hut who has never seen 
the inside of a technical school. When a man 
poses as a mining expert he should have the 
qualifications of such an expert. These qualifica- 
tions are gained only through years of study and 
practical experience. For a man to pose as an 
expert without the qualifications of one is enrirelv 
wrong, and is something that the mining industry 
should be protected against. Would-be experts 
of this class can he bought for less than their 
technical education cost them. They will write 
any kind of a report for a mining company. It is 
therefore up to the investor to investigate the 
standing of experts employed by mining com- 
panies, as well as the officers, directors, etc. 
Where the expert has no standing the report of 
the expert should have no standing in the eyes of 
the investor. On the other hand, if the expert 
who makes the report is a man of standing in his 
profession his report should be read thoroughly 
by the investor and should prove a series of facts 
upon which the investor can base his opinion as 
regards the economical and physical conditions of 
the property being considered. 



PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 



Natural Gas in California 

j& j& By A. S. COOPER, M. E. jS? j& 



k 



NO. VIII. 

STRUCTURE OF THE GREAT VALLEY OF CALI- 
FORNIA. 

It is to be presumed from surface indications 
that the marine strata forms a large oval bowl un- 
der the surface of the Great Valley, bent in 
some places by anticlinal folds and broken in 
other places by fissured faults, that this oval 
bowl has been partly filled with alluvium and 
debris washed from the Sierra Nevada and 
Coast Ranges, that the beds of debris and al- 
luvium decline towards the Carquines Strait and 




Relief Map of California, by N. F. Drake, cour- 
tesy Lewis E. Aubury, State Mineralogist. 

Fig. 20 is a relief map of California showing the 
geographical configuration of the Great Valley 
of California, being a vast oval bowl with its 
perimeter cut by the Strait of Carquines. 
The Strait of Carquines is opposite the letter 
A. The black and white crosses show where 
natural gas has been obtained and exists. In 
fact all of the Great Valley and the Coast 
Ranges yield natural gas in greater or less 
quantity. 

that this alluvium and debris beds would act as 
conduits to convey the subterranean water to- 
wards this point. 

If the marine strata form a large oval bowl 
under the surface of the Great Valley the only 
place that perimeter of this bowl is cut is at the 
Strait of Carquines. Consequently the marine 
stratification and unconsolidated beds act as con- 
duits to convey the subterranean water of this 
valley to the eastern entrance of Carquines 
Strait. 

If the Pleistocene beds in the center of the 
Valley are three thousand feet thick, a shallow 
well drilled near the eastern side of Suisun Bay 



would penetrate formations that lie three thous- 
and feet below the surface of the Great Valley 
in the center of the same; for instance at the 
city of Stockton. 

During the early Cretaceous the Great Val- 
ley of California was partly under water and 
the Coast Ranges seem to have been repre- 
sented by a group of islands, but during the later 
Cretaceous the region subsided and the sea sub- 
stantially overflowed them. Late in the Neo- 
cene the sea once more retreated west of the 
Coast Ranges. During the whole of the Neo- 
cene the Great Valley seems to have been un- 
der water forming a gulf connected with the 
sea. The shore line of this gulf was several 
hundred feet above the present level of the ocean. 

A mountain building disturbance occurred dur- 
ing the Neocene period. This was caused by a 
pressure acting from the southwest towards the 
northeast. The effects of this pressure was the 
production of fissures, faults, anticlines and syn- 
clines. The bearing of these run roughly paral- 
lel with the mountain ranges. 

At the close of the Tertiary the Great Valley 
and its surrounding mountains were uplifted en 
masse several hundreds of feet. 

Exposures of Pliocene strata on the eastern 
side of the gulf that once occupied the Great 
Valley show that the strata is greater than 2 de- 
grees or 185 feet to a mile. At Stockton, which 
is over twenty miles southwest of the Eocene Gulf 
shore, these strata before the general uplift of 
the Pacific Coast and the Coast Ranges would 
be over 3,700 feet below Stockton. Deduct from 
this 500 feet for the Pliocene general uplift, as 
is indicated by the ancient Pliocene shores on 
the western slope of the Sierra Nevada and these 
strata would lie over 3,000 feet below the sur- 
face at Stockton. 

The steepness of the dip of the strata of the 
Coast Ranges adjoining the Great Valley on the 
southwest would tend to show that the regional 
uplift of the Coast Ranges did not raise the 
formation at Stockton to any great extent. 

Consequently unconsolidated material would 
fill the Great Valley to a depth of over 3,000 
feet. 

Between the Sacramento and San Joaquin 
Valleys and the Pacific Ocean are the- Coast 
Ranges from sixty to eighty miles wide. The 
Coast Ranges consists of a number of chains of 
mountains and intervening valleys running 
roughly parallel with each other and the shores 
of the Pacific Ocean. These chains of moun- 
tains consists principally of shales and sandstones 
and generally have a core of metamorphic or plu- 
tonic rocks. Tertiary rocks often adjoin the 
metamorphic rocks south of San Francisco, 
whereas north of San Francisco the Cretaceous 
strata are more often seen in contact with meta- 
morphic rocks. The Coast Ranges act as a dam 
to conserve the surface and subterranean waters 
of the Great Valley, the only outlet for these 
waters is the Strait of Carquines. The stratified 
rocks do not reach a sufficient altitude on the 
sides of the Sierra Nevada to produce a sufficient 
hydrostratic pressure to force the water trans- 
versely to the Coast ' through the Coast Ranges 
of mountains. The flow of water would be in 
the direction of least resistance which would be 
towards the eastern end of the Strait of Car- 
quines. East of the trough of the San Joaquin 
Valley artesian water is rarely found above an 



altitude of two hundred and seventy-five feet; 
west of the trough artesian water will hardly 
ever raise to that height. 

Owing to the ascent of mineralized water the 
shales and sandstones at Army and Bulls Head 
points at the eastern end of the Strait of Car- 
quines have become calcified and silicified, which 
to a great extent makes them impervious to water. 
By this cementation they form a submerged dam 
for retaining water in the Cretaceous and Ter- 
tiary formation of the Great Valley, forcing the 
subterranean flow of water coming from the 
Valley to come to the surface before reaching 
this point. 

As the marine strata of the Great Valley were 
formed beneath the sea and have never been 
raised above sea level, it can be assumed that they 
are filled with water. As a storage reservoir for 
subterrenean water the Great Valley of Cali- 
fornia is rarely excelled throughout the entire 
world. 

The Pleistocene beds in the Great Valley con- 
sisting principally of clay and being but little dis- 




Fig 21 is the flame of natural gas six feet high 
from a one-inch orifice and a well eighteen feet 
deep near Orland, Colusa County. 

turbed since their deposition, make a perfect cover 
for the conservation of petroleum oil and free 
natural gas or gas in solution with water in the 
underlying Neocene, Eocene and Cretaceous 
strata. If natural gas rise through these beds it 
is arrested and retained by the Pleistocene cover. 
This is one reason that but little surface indica- 
tions of oil exist in the center and eastern side 
of the Great Valley. 

The fluviatile strata in the valley would act 
as a good encasement for the retention of oil and 
natural gas far superior to the cover found in 
the formations of the surrounding hills and 
mountains. 

The recent filling of the Great Valley consists 
of clays, sands and gravels. The Coast Ranges 
are composed of shales, sandstones and conglom- 
erates. 

The marine strata were deposited on the 
flanks of the Sierra Nevada while the strata of 
the Coast Ranges were being deposited beneath 
the ocean. Then the Coast Ranges and the 
Sierra Nevada were uplifted regionally and en 
masse. During this period regional disturbances 
were greater in the Coast Ranges than in the 
Sierra Nevada. The strata of the sedimentary 



:i IC OIL !': 



of tli p at high 

idging 
which have been de- 
nuded from the anticlines of the Coast Ranges 
I fiften thousand feel in thick- 
n the center of the valley. Wells drilled 
for natural lius have penetrated the Strata of this 
valley to a depth of two thousand feet ami did nut 
net through the unconsolidated filling of the 
valley. 

When the orgenic force displayed in the crea- 
- ami Sierra Nevada 
and the number of times that they have been 
uplifted and subsided is considered, it appears 
impossible that the floor of the Great Valley 
remained one large and regularly formed syn- 
cline. As a number of large anticlines and faults 
occur in the Coast Ranges, some of which disap- 
pear beneath the filling of the Great Valley, and 
that a number of small faults occur in the Sierra 
la running parallel with the faults of the 
Coast Ranges, it can be expected that the in- 
tervening space in the Great Valley should be 
faulted. 

there are a large number of faults and 
fissures in the Coast Ranges and the Sierra Ne- 
vada which have about the same direction, and 
the upthrow of the faults in both ranges of 



be lol 

ills until tl ,- r the 

illey, and :!»■ compn 
■ ned, a well sunk in the I 
on this nay produi 

and anticlines tend to run in straight or 
gently curving 

Others will probably be found In wild catting 
and others will he dctcrnun. I 

of fluviatile deposition. 

Robert T. Hill says in speaking ot the Beau- 
mont oil fields: "In the general monotonous 
monoclinal structure of the Coast and Prairie 
and the Gulf, there are a feu wrinkles or small 
swells likely to escape the eye of even a trained 
observer, and yel a character which may have 
important bearing on the oil problem. There are 
circular and oval mounds. Spin by a 

gradual slope only ten feel above the surround- 
ing prairie plains. A careful examination may 
reveal such mounds in the Sacramento and San 
Joaquin Valleys. Mounds that have not been 
leveled down to the level of the plain or mounds 
the result of an upthrust since the forming of the 
plain." 

In sections 2, 3, 11 and 1.?, township 26 south, 
range 20 east, M. D. M., an isolated range of 
low hills rises out of the monotonous plains of 
the San Joaquin Valley. The trend of these 
hills arc northwest and southeast and are dis- 
tant five miles from any other prominent elevation 
and within six miles of the trough of the San 



ere laid down 1 

The oldest 
to the I 
■ . si side of the buttes 
I Is HI - I ghl colored s,.: 
ipin .■; about 20 d 
the Neocene. 

In the banks ot the Sacramento River east of 
Red Muff strati 

dip at a In wards the west under 

■ beds, « hereas this same tub 
a Canyon five miles north of Red Muff tonus an 
anticline the axis of which trend north and 
south. 

hour miles northwest ot Carbondale the lone 
beds are bent in the form of an anticline with 
its axis bearing nearly easl and 

South of the Merced Falls are two Ievel- 
topped buttes capped by Eocene sandstone which 
rests nearly horizontally upon the upturned 
of underlying slates. These sandstones are over- 
lain unconformable by later formed light colored 
sandstone. 

At the Cherokee Flat in Butte County there 
is a local subsidence. 

Lying within this vast reservoir 'are great 
quantities of water holding in solution hundreds 
of trillions of cubic feet of natural gas which can 
be obtained and applied to useful purposes. The 
supply of natural gas being constantly replenished 
by the decomposition of petroleum oil and the 



MOUNT DIABLO 



SIERRA NEVADA, 




Fig. 22 is a cross section of the Great Valley on a northeast and southwest line passing through the Summit of Mount Diablo. Strata are exposed on 
the flank of Mount Diablo that in the trough of the valley are many thousands of feet below the surface. On the eastern shore of Suisun 
Bay the drill will pierce strata, yielding water and gas, at a shallow depth that lie several thousand feet below the City of Stockton. 



mountains occurring on the northeast side of the 
fissure seemingly being formed by the same force 
operating from the southwest, and seeing that 
these faults have been formed nearly at the 
same time, it can safely be assumed that there 
must be a large number of faults in the Great 
Valley which intervenes between these moun- 
tain chains, these faults being hidden by the de- 
bris filling the valley. And as it is known that 
millions of feet of gas ascend through the fis- 
sures in the Coast Ranges, natural gas must as- 
cend through fissures underlying the unconsoli- 
dated filling of the Great Valley. 

If the Great Valley of California is a subsi- 
dence (which is doubtful), such a vast area could 
not have subsided without being broken, dislo- 
cated and bent, some parts of the valley having 
subsided more quickly or to a greater extent than 
others. 

The vast amount of petroleum oil and gas 
found in the formations surrounding the Great 
Valley and natural gas held in solution with 
water is evidence that dislocations and contor- 
tions of the strata underlying the valley do exist 
which are hidden by the Pleistocene filling of the 
valley. 

If they do exist we can expect to find petro- 
leum oil and free natural gas in the valley. If 
the discovery of some of these disturbances can 



Joaquin Valley. The structure of these have 
not been examined but in all possibility they 
represent part of the axis of an anticline. 

An anticline exposed at Oil City nine miles 
north of Coalinga and well defined its entire dis- 
tance of tu : enty-five miles and having a strike 
about south 47 degrees east extends from section 
20, township 19 south, range 15 east, M. D. M. 
(Oil City) through the summit of the Kettle- 
man Hills to township 23 south, range 19 east, 
M. D. M., to within four miles of the western 
boundary line of the Tulare Lake as surveyed in 
1883. At this point it sinks below the surface of 
the San Joaquin Valley. If this anticline main- 
tains the same course after it disappears beneath 
the surface of the valley it would pass through 
the center of the valley. 

The Marysville Buttes rises from the plain 
of the Sacramento Valley and near the middle of 
the valley. The Buttes are surrounded with 
sandstones, gravels and clay beds very much dis- 
turbed, and dip at all angles and in all directions 
though as a rule they dip away from the central 
core, and when near it stand at a high angle 
— sometimes vertical. At the immediate con- 
tact with the massive volcanic rocks these sedi- 
ments are usually hardened. 

No volcanic detritus of the same rocks of 
which the buttes are made are found in the sedi- 
mentary rucks and it may be regarded as cer 



distillation of carbonaceous and bituminous mat- 
ter. 

Roughly speaking, the drainage area of the 
San Joaquin and Sacramento Valleys is 420 miles 
by 120 miles or 50.4S0 square miles or 1,419,- 
264,000,000 square feet. If rain fell over this 
area to a depth of one foot annually, which is 
probable, and one-third of the amount was evap- 
orated and consumed by vegetation, 946,162,000,- 
000 cubic feet would annually pass through the 
Strait of Carquines either by surface or subter- 
ranean flow. 

Below the line of permanent water the sub- 
terranean flow of water beneath the Sacramento 
and San Joaquin Valleys must be exceei 
slow. Its retardation is sufficient to enable the 
obtaining of artesian wells throughout the cen- 
tral part of the valleys. If the flow is feeble it 
can be understood that if the water is once im- 
pregnated with natural gas it may remain s 
a long time and by diffusion be constantly acquir- 
ing more until saturated or sufficient to re| 
that lost through the escape of water ch 
with gas from wells and spri 

The following phenomena have been ob- 
served in shallow wells in sect: .iship 
23 north, range 4 west, M. D. Base and Meri- 
dian, Tehama County: 

The formation consists of alternating beds 
of sandstone and shale of marine deposition. In 



PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 



places these beds are covered with a quarternary 
deposit of detritus consisting of gravel and clay. 
In other places the marine beds of sandstone and 
shale are covered with basalt. The dip of the 
entire strata is east towards the Sacramento 
River. 

Air issues from the shallow wells for a short 
time, followed by carbureted hydrogen gas. • The 
flow of the gas continues for several days then 
ceases and then air is sucked into the wells for 
several days. This cycle of changes being con- 
stantly repeated. Wells about half a mile apart 
act nearly in unison as to the flow of gas and 
suction of air. These phenomena are probably 
due to the following causes: Natural gas, pe- 
troleum oil and water deposit themselves in po- 
rous and seamed strata in accordance to their 
specific gravity. The gas being the lightest re- 
mains on top. The water by its superior gravity 
on the bottom and the oil between the gas and 
water. Gravity is constantly urging them to 
assume these positions. 

Meteoric water flowing from higher altitudes 
down permeable strata obstruct the ascent of the 
gas, the gas then accumulates until it acquires 
sufficient tension to break through and scatter 
the water. The gas then flows through gravel 
beds and from the gravel beds into the wells. 
After the force of the gas is decreased sufficiently 
the water again flows down the permeable strata 
and by this action sucks air into the porous strata. 
This air is ejected from the wells in advance of 
the gas flow. 

After heavy rainfalls the period of the flow of 
gas is shortened and the period of inactivity in- 
creased showing that a larger volume of water 
than that which flows in summer time is flowing 
down the permeable strata and obstructing the 
flow of gas. 

Gas issuing from an inch orifice in one of the 
shallow wells gave a flame six feet in height. 
This gas has but little odor and burns with a 
fairly luminous flame. The luminosity of the 
flame shows that it comes from the decomposi- 
tion of petroleum oil or the distillation of carbon- 
aceous or bituminous matter. The gas is probably 
being generated at the present time. 

The flow of gas must equal several million 
feet daily as it has been observed over an area 
of several miles issuing from dug and drilled 
wells, holes dug for fence posts, and must also 
escape in numerous other places undetected. 

If the gas yielding strata were pierced with a 
well and nature assisted artificially to keep the 
water removed from the well, a large and con- 
stant flow of gas should be obtained. 

. The water flowing down the permeable strata 
coming in contact with the natural gas absorbs 
a quantity of the same. This water with gas in 
solution flows beneath the surface of the Sacra- 
mento Valley and goes to furnish artesian wells 
and springs yielding gas at lower elevations. 

TUSCAN SPRINGS. 

These are situated eight miles northeast of Red 
Bluff, Tehama County, at an elevation of 925 
feet, and are found issuing over an area of ten 
acres in a basin of sedimentary rocks about six 
hundred feet across and surrounded by volcanic 
bluffs. The unaltered rocks show an anticlinal 
structure. Fifty springs are known, but less than 
half of this number has been improved. They 
appear to vary widely in their composition. Some 
of the springs evolve a large amount of carbureted 
hydrogen which is used to heat the water for 
bathing purposes. The natural temperature of 
the springs varies from 67 degrees to 94 degrees 
Fahr. The heaviest constant flow of gas issues 
from a spring designated as No. 17 at the rate 
rate of 20,000 cubic feet per day. These springs 
have probably been yielding gas for several hun- 



dreds or maybe thousands of years. By artifiicial 
means the flow of water from these springs could 
be largely increased and thereby the flow of nat- 
ural gas increased as the gas at a depth below 
the surface must be in solution with the water. 

There are a number of wells at Stockton which 
yield artesian water with gas in solution. These 
wells yield from 15,000 to 75,000 cubic feet of 
gas daily. The formation penetrated by these 
wells at Stockton consists of unconsolidated beds 
of clay and sand many times repeated. Flowing 
water is not obtained until about 800 feet is 
reached, consequently no gas is obtained until 
that depth. Flowing water with gas in solution 
is obtained in several beds, the artesian flow be- 
ing greatest in the lowest beds. These wells are 
bored to a depth of 1,500 to 3,000 feet. The 
daily flow from the wells at Stockton aggregate 
about 400,000 cubic feet of natural gas. Simi- 
lar wells exist at Sacramento city. By artificial 
means the flow of these wells at Stockton could 
be increased to 800,000 to 2,000,000 cubic feet 
daily. So far the boring of succeeding wells do 
not interfere with the flow of preceeding wells. 
When yielding gas the wells yield mineralized 
waters. 

There are many other springs and wells yield- 
ing natural gas and exhalations of natural gas in 
the Great Valley of California which will 'be 
described in future papers. 



October Statistics 



KERN RIVER. 

Number wells producing 660 

Total production for September 1,465,892 

Barrels shipped 1,042,595 

Wells completed 3 

Wells drilling 5 

Wells abandoned 5 

New derricks 4 

Total storage* 3,132,250 

COALINGA. 

Number wells producing 138 

Total production for September ..... 470,887 

Barrels shipped 510,435 

Wells completed 5 

Wells abandned 

Wells drilling .".','*:■ . 41 

New derricks 17 

Total storage* 247,750 

SANTA MARIA AND LOMPOC. 

Number wells producing 18 

Total production for September 46,380 

Barrels shipped 31,250 

Wells completed .' 1 ' 

Wells drilling 17 

Wells abandoned 

New derricks 2 

Total storage* 58,950 

LOS ANGELES. 

Number of wells producing 1,074 

Total production for September 110,314 

Barrels shipped 84,654 

Wells completed 1 

Wells drilling . . / . 23 

Wells abandoned 

New derricks 4 

Total storage* 521,575 

FULLERTON AND BREA CANYON. 

Number of wells producing 106 

Total production for September 109,303 

Barrels shipped 1 10,343 

Wells completed 3 

Wells drilling 22 

Wells abandoned 

New derricks . 2 

Total storage* ' 337,750 

PUENTE. 

Number of wells producing 33 



Total production for September 3,025 

Barrels shipped 2,050 

Wells completed 

Wells drilling 1 

Wells abandoned 

New derricks 

Total storage* 17,475 

WHITTIER. 

Number wells producing 83 

Total production for September 49,245 

Barrels shipped 45,990 

Wells completed 6 

Wells drilling 10 

Wells abandoned 

New derricks 4 

Total storage* 200,000 

NEWHALL. 

Number wells producing 65 

Total production for September 11,690 

Barrels shipped 8,825 

Wells completed 

Wells drilling 3 

Wells abandoned 

New derricks 

Total storage* 20,050 

VENTURA. 

Number wells producing 255 

Total production for September 49,475 

Barrels shipped . . .' 49,550 

Wells completed (] 

Wells drilling 5 

Wells abandoned 

New derricks 1 

Total storage* 69,800 

SUMMERI.AND. 

Number of wells producing 199 

Total production for September 9,870 

Barrels shipped 9,870 

Wells drilling 1 

Wells abandoned 

Wells drilling 

New derricks 2 

Total storage* 38,750 

SUNSET. 

Number wells producing 31 

Total production for September 21,650 

Barrels shipped 22,375 

Wells completed 

Wells drilling 17 

Wells abandoned -,. .... 

New derricks ■.....'-." 

Total storage* . . ' 492,675 

MIDWAY. 

Number of wells shut in 33 

Total production for September 

Barrels shipped 

Wells completed 

Wells drilling 5 

Wells abandoned 

New derricks 

Total storage* . . 21,550 

m'kittrick. 

Number wells producing 65 

Total production for September 192,200 

Barrels shipped 266,675 

Wells completed 

Wells drilling 2 

Wells abandoned 

New derricks 2 

Total storage* 299,850 

SARGENTS. 

Number wells producing 3 

Total production for September 6,150 

Barrels shipped 5,250 

Wells completed Q 

Wells drilling 2 

Wells abandoned ' 

New derricks ] 

. Total storage* 1 1 950 






PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 



Numfa 

production 
Barrels shipped 

19 

Wdls drilling 154 

Wells abandoni . . 5 

Total storage* 2.4; 

• include storage "t P. C. O. Co. or 
S. P. I 



Undoubtedly there is no industry in which 
money is more rapidly gained nr lust than in the 
development of an oil country. Wherever the 

oil prospector has been there follows exciting 
talix of quickly made fortunes and unlooked-for 
wealth. An old couple in Indiana, whose sole 
possessions consisted of forty acres of rough land 
and a cabin, on becoming suddenly wealthy by 
the striking of oil on an adjoining tract of land, 
would not change their manner of living, which 



offered various amounts, varying froi 
up to a point that would 
get dti N ■ so with our frii rul wno, 

solicitors became more and more nun 
refuge in his cabin behind barricaded doors 
would he show himself foi mahj 
one should take his coverted farm from him. 
Finally he was persuaded. In a man whom he 
knew, to go to Hakcrsticld, where he was im- 
mediately taken to a hank, where the offer of 
$100,000 was repeated to him and to further con- 
vince him the money was piled upon a table 
and both the would-be purchasers and bank of- 
ficials assured him it was all his put for the sign- 
ing of a deed conveying the title of the propcrn 
from him. Straightening to his full height anil 
shifting his "quid" he replied that if it was worth 
a $100,000 to them it was worth that to him, 
and back he went to the plow. Later the tract 
was proven to be out of the oil belt and to-day 
it would not bring $1000 under the hammer, but 
to our rural cousin its intrinsic value has not 
changed. 



I and Spiteful show that 

oed there is little different 
and hard fuel : but it 

handled, that steam can 
time, that it is cleaner in hand 1 in 
and that fewer men are r 

i the insufficient si Th. 

of Europi 

experts, saj ~: ' ["he di , 

will be on a still larger scale than those which 

have been reached In deep bur in : 

cut. There must still he enormous sources of <,il 

awaiting development. The sources ot petroleum 
are constantly being renewed, There are still 
extensive bituminous strata undiscovered and un- 
known, and these will yet produce huge quantities 
of oil." This is correct ; in rli Baku 

fields of Russia, the Boryslaw lieUls of Galicia, 
the "1,1 ami well-drilled fields of Petrolia, Canada, 
and in America, both in the old fields of the north 
and in the new ones of Texas, the drillers are 
finding more prolific sources of supply in the 




Large reservoir in back-ground and two smaller ones in fore-ground filled with oil from California Fortune well No. 4, Sunset. 



was little better than that of the cattle they fed. 
A poor but thrifty parish became hopelessly in 
debt and their church was soon to be sold un- 
der the hammer when oil was struck on an ad- 
joining lot. . A part of the church lot was leased 
and the royalty has not only paid off the debt 
but has filled the treasury beyond all present 
needs. The parson was vexed because the drill- 
ers would not stop work during his sermon, the 
noise of the machinery often drownding his voice, 
but the good fortune following has appeased his 
anger. Near Bakersfield, Cal., lives a man who 
is at peace with all the world because he has 
never tasted that for which he has not labored. 
Possessing a small tract of land, which he home- 
steaded from the government, he has been content 
with the product of his farm. Ignorant beyond 
comparison he cared little for money and less for 
what it would purchase. At the time the great 
Kern oil field was being developed everything 
pointed to a strong possibility that the above 
tract of land was within the oil zone. Immedi- 
ately commenced the attempt to purchase it, and 
its owner was approached day and night and 



Evidence is accumulating that liquid fuel is 
being slowly adopted by the British Admiralty. 
As the battleships of the Majestic class go to the 
dockyards to be overhauled they are fitted for the 
consumption of oil fuel as an auxiliary to coal. 
For nearly two years the battleships Mars and 
Hannibal, part of Lord Charles Beresford's 
Channel command, have burned oil in some of 
their furnaces. Just before the crisis some of the 
boilers of the Prince George were fitted with 
oil-burning apparatus, and tank accommodation 
for 400 tons of oil was provided in the double 
bottom of the ship. It is clear that the Admiralty 
have decided to use oil fuel for reserve purposes. 
The experiments in the torpedo-boat destroyers 

California Fortune Oil Go. Stockholders: 

Please send your addresses to the office 
of the Company. 

CALIFORNIA FORTUNE OIL CO., 
226 Parrott Building, 

San Francisco, California. 



deeper strata, which are being more easily reached 
by the employment of more perfect drilling tools. 
— Petroleum World. 



A town lot w-ould be as advantageous a loca- 
tion for a well as a quarter of a section when the 
well is operated by Cooper's gas lift, provided 
that another gas lifht is not employed in another 
well within a radius of fourteen hundred feet. 

When wells are connected by the same porous 
strata the well or wells operated bj i gas lift 
will draw water with gas in solution away from 
other wells which depend solely upon I 
pressure. 

One artesian well has been known to 
another artesian well, which is half a mi 
more distant and an artesian well in. the 
of another artesian well when pi beer, 

known to take the water away from the well 
not pumped. Owing to the abov* ,. small an 
of land only will haw I ired in or. 

control a large area of land yielding water 
gas irr solution provided the exclusive right to 
use the gas lift for a certain territo ured. 



PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 



NEWS FROM THE FIELD 

Supplied by Our Regular Correspondents— Recent 
Developments in the Great Oil Fields of the West 



KERN 



Bakersfield, Cal, Nov. 24, 1904. 

The situation in the oil business of Kern county 
at the present time, shows a state that has never 
happened in this State before. 

With three large corporations in complete 
control of the entire output of the oil fields, it 
does look as though the condition of the oil pro- 
ducer would be improved within the next few 
months. 

Of the three corporations, two of them, the 
Associated Oil Comapny and the Independent 
Producers' organization, control at least seven- 
tenths of the total production of the Kern county 
oil fields, while about two-tenths or one-fifth is 
produced by companies that are both outside of 
the Associated Oil Company and the Independ- 
ent Producers' Association, but this 20 per 
cent is sold to the Standard Oil Company on long 
time contracts and cannot be said to affect the 
present market to any great extent, competent 
operators agree in saying that not more than 
10 per cent, of the production is outside of these 
combinations. 

The Standard Oil Company as a factor cannot 
be overlooked, on account of its unlimited capital, 
and with this advantage on its side, is in a posi- 
tion where time or quantity of oil stored awaiting 
a market makes no difference with them. 

But at the same time the Standard Oil Com- 
pany cannot be said to have any reason for 
being on the bear side of fuel oil, as but little 
of that oil is used in refining purposes, and 
what profit the Standard derives from a low 
market is only from its ability to wait until the 
selling price is high enough to give them a good 
profit on oil bought and stored by them. 

On the other hand, both the Associated Oil 
Company and the Independent organization have 
everything to gain from a high market and all 
lose from the opposite, they are both producers 
of oil and unless the market price allows them 
to produce and sell at a good profit, they afle 
sure to lost money in the oil business. 

The present association has been forced into 
being a combination of circumstances, and by the 
smaller operators who could see nothing ahead of 
them but financial ruin in the oil business, or a 
strong organization of some sort that would 
effectually control the present production of oil, 
above what is already contracted for at living 
prices. The members of the present association 
have succeeded a great deal better than they 
had any hopes of in the beginning of the move- 
ment. They have succeeded in getting into an 
iron-clad association practically all of the oil 
produced in Kern county, with the exception of a 
possible 10 per cent., not counting oil contracted 
with, the Standard or that produced by the As- 
sociated Oil Company. 

And in the movement to advance the price 
of oil, they have at least the hope of success on 
the part of the Associated Oil Company if not 
their openly expressed desire, for every cent ad- 
vance in oil the Associated Oil Company will 
reap, correspondingly profits from their produc- 
tion. The Independents think they will meet 
with but very little trouble from the Associated 
in advancing the price, and while accounting the 
Standard as being on the bear side, at the same 



time they know if- the Standard does not have the 
competition of the small operators to meet in the 
market for small contracts with consumers, it 
will be perfectly willing for the price of oil to 
go to one or two dollars a barrel so they will 
get their profit as middleman in marketing the 
oil. 

What disposition the Independent organization 
will make of their oil is at the present time in an 
unsettled state, the prevalent idea among the 
first proposers of the movement was that the 
best plan would be to contract with either the 
Associated Oil Company or the Standard, for 
entire production at a fair price, but since so 
many of the companies have been gathered into 
the association and have expressed such strong 
feelings on any way to advance the price, that 
the idea of entering into the markets and in- 
creasing the present demand and marketing their 
own oil, getting the additional profit themselves 
in preference to giving it to either-the Standard 
or Associated gains ground with many of the 
most heavily interested operators. 

The production of the Independent organiza- 
tion totals many barrels of oil daily more than 
that of the Associated Oil Company, and those in 
favor of doing their own marketing argue that 
why should we who have more oil to sell than the 
Associated, allow them to sell our oil, when we 
could as well do it ourselves? 

But on the other side there is a large number 
of operators who have been against this move- 
ment, who argue that the independents are pro- 
ducers of oil, and the only cause for the existence 
of the organization is to advance the price re- 
ceived by ourselves to a living profit, and if either 
of the two other corporations will give us a 
fair deal and allow us to make a decent profit on 
our production, why not allow them to market 
the oil instead of going to all the expense neces- 
sary ourselves. 

The open price for spot oil has been advanced 
by the Standard from 12j^ cents to 15 cents a 
barrel, but the best information says there is but 
a very small amount of oil obtainable at this 
price, and only from some of the smaller com- 
panies who need ready cash in order to meet 
their labor bills and other expenses of running 
the leases. 

The general feeling among the members of the 
organization is that nothing less than 25 cents 
to start with will satisfy them, that if they cannot 
get this price for the entire p/oduction to be- 
gin with, it will be better to see what can be 
done towards marketing the product themselves 
through different agencies established in the 
larger cities. 

They fully realize that unless an understanding 
is reached with the larger companies regarding 
their production, it will be useless to keep up 
the organization without making a fight to the 
end, for they are sure to lose unless the price is 
advanced, and if they lose in making a fight 
against the big companies in the oil markets, they 
will be no worse off than if they had never made 
the fight. 

All the operators hope there will be no neces- 
sity for any fight, every consumer of oil realizes 
he can pay more for . oil than the present rate, 
and then have an immense advantage over the 
user of coal. ■ Any proposed advance in the price 



of oil is not enough to hurt any of the con- 
sumers, but the small difference represents a loss, 
in the producing end of the business or a good 
profit. 

Development work in the field is practically 
at a stand still. Unless the price is materially 
advanced no one can afford to do any more drill- 
ing. Some few companies put a few wells down 
to either keep up their production or because 
their lease demands such work be done. 

The water question does not seem to be in- 
creasing to any large extent, and while a great 
many of the wells through the field have fallen 
off some in production, yet the grand total of loss 
in production is not any more than is expected 
from a field the size of the Kern River and with 
the large number of wells constantly on the 
beam. 

Report has it that the Standard Oil Company 
has planned to finish a total of 32 large reservoirs, 
which, if completed at the present rate, will 
give them a total of nearly 20,000,000 barrels 
storage, or according to best accounts, about one 
year's supply of oil at the present rate of con- 
sumption on the Coast. 

The following is generally supposed by the 
Independents to be the present production of 
oil in the Kern River field : 

Produced by companies who have contracts 
with the Standard Oil Company and sell to no 
other market, daily, 12,000 barrels. 

Produced by the Associated Oil Company and 
marketed or stored by them, 14,000 barrels. 

Produced by members of the Independent 
Producers' Organization and heretofore sold to 
the Standard Oil Company, sold to consumers, 
Associated Oil Company, or stored, 19,000 bar- 
rels, daily. 

Produced by the railroad leases, by compa- 
nies selling their entire production to the rail- 
roads, and by companies outside either the As- 
sociated Oil Company or the Independent Pro- 
ducers, not to exteed 7,000 barrels, daily. 

Making a total of 52,000 barrels, daily, which 
is figured to be somewhat larger than the actual 
daily production by perhaps 6,000 barrels. But, 
allowing for exageration on some estimates comes 
very near the actual' production. 



KANSAS 



Chanute, Kas., Nov. 21, 1904. 

The one question in the minds of those Kansans 
interested in gas and oil is the piping of the gas 
out of the State. The Kansas Natural Gas Co., 
the Associated Oil Companies, the P. C. C. and 
other companies have enough gas now bottled up 
to furnish cheap fuel to all the United States. 
The total daily productive capacity of the wells 
in Kansas amounts to something more than 
800,000,000 cubic feet and this equals in steam 
producing capacity more than forty thousand 
tons of coal. This gas can be supplied to con- 
sumers at Kansas City and St. Louis, for less 
than 50 cents a thousand feet and still the com- 
panies will make a profit. 

The effort to pipe the gas out of the State 
began some three weeks ago when pipe lines were 
strung from Independence, Kansas, to the State 
line on the East. Then the people of Mont- 
gomery county, in which Independence is located,, 
rose up and began doing things. They had the 
dagoes who were building the pipe line arrested 
for obstructing the public highway, they fined 
the people who were at the head of the pipe line 
enterprise for doing things contrary to public 
policy, and what they did not do does not 
amount to much. 

The pipe line companies responded with an 



PACIFIC Oil 



application inr an injunction the 

CUtions, in fact the applii .11 in- 

junction which restrained people from even 
thinking of opposing the iilea of piping th 
to other towns than Independence. The ques- 
tion has been fought out in the courts and the 
Judge now has the division under advisement 

The decision means much lis, Joplin, 

Scdalia, Springfield and all the rest ot the tonus 

and cities in Missouri It 1 npanies v in 

it means cheap fuel for all the country within a 
radius of tour hundred miles iron, Chanute, but 

it the gas companies lose it means that the ream 
of cheap fuel must he postponed for yet a little 
while. The gas companies an- anxious tor a 
speed) so that they can get the gas out 

of the state before the meeting ot the legislature. 
When that body meets there will be petition after 
petition presented tor remedial legislation which 
will prevent the piping of gas out ot the state 
and thus save the people all the great supply 
of fuel which is right at hand. 

The people of the gas belt have organized a 
protective association to take care of their inter- 
ests, but the protective association, like all other 
things, must bow to a decree of the courts. The 
protective association managed to get the char- 
ter of one of the gas companies held up at To- 
peka for a while, but this seems to have been 
only one step in the game. The gas company 
in .question acquired the charter of another com- 
pany and is going ahead with its business just 
as if there were no charter board. In fact, the 
gas companies, which are desirous of getting 
their output to Kansas City and St. Louis, have 
all the best of the argument. They say that 
gas is no more a natural product than coal or 
oil and as long as the people do not object to 
the carrying of coal and the piping of oil out 



of the state thei thev 

should be piping 1 

The plans of the 
eight-inch main to Joplin and then an eight 
line from the nearest point to ;- k 

iris. Perhaps the) . fran- 

chise in these cities and perhaps they ma' 
It is a matter ot in.; fl to them. They 

have the fuel and thev think tiny will have the 
price. Thev believe that with these things in 
their favor that conditions will adjust them- 
selves in time. 

The pipe line cannot reach St. Louis in time 
for this winter's fuel, but it will be there early 
in the spring. The line from Chanute or Inde- 
pendence to St. Louis will be more than four 
hundred miles long and will supply all the towns 
and cities along the nay. Franchises in a num- 
ber ot these towns have already been secured. 

It is more than probable that a proposition 
will be made to the city council of St. Louis 
within the next few weeks to supply that city 
with cheap gas. There is more than enough gas 
within live miles of Chanute to supply the entire 
country and the control of this Supply has been 
so organized that the people can make a propo- 
sition to supply almost an unlimited amount of 
fuel and light and be on the safe side. And 
the daily productive capacity is being all the time 
increased. Within the week just passed it has 
been increased by more than 20,000,000 cubic 
feet per day. 

Enough nitro glycerine is exploded at 
the bottom of oil wells in the Kansas 
field eveiy year to blow three or four cities the 
size of Kansas City to atoms. Twenty quarts 
to the well is a fair average and for the four 
thousand wells now producing oil that would 
mean eighty thousand quarts. It takes eight 
hundred quarts a month to bring in the oil wells. 
There is one man in Chanute who has handled 
enough of this stuff to blow up the United States 



wrinkles 

in containin 

h the river 

pet] hump iu-: 
no dancer within a thousand mi 
whistles and sings as he rides with 
while all the knowing folk w e the 

team coming look for a wide pla road. 

wells is as old as the oil in, 
itself. When the first well were drilled in 
Pennsylvania, now more than forty In 1 
ago, thev found that the oil in the sand would 
not pump freely. There must he a cavity at the 
bottom ot the well so that the oil could 

through and form a little poo; «■ full 

pumping capacity could he obtained. So in those 
early days thev used black powder and dynamite. 
When the well was drilled in they would send 
down the .1 : lack powder and explode it 

with a line shot. That is thev would send a 
hollow weight down a line and this exploded 
the cap or firing head and that exploded the 
charge. It was a very unsatisfactory as well as 
expensive method, this of shooting ivells between 
1856 and 1864. Hut it was the bet the opera- 
tors of that day could do. 

The first well in the United States shot with 
nitro-glycerine was the Lady Washington on 
Watson Flats, in the Titusville (Po.) field, on 
May 22, 1864. The glycerine was made by 
Professor W. A. Myersand ; the shot was fired 
by him. The glycerine was sent down in shells 
and was exploded in the same manner as the 
old black powder shot. But it was a great im- 
provement in that the flow of oil from the wells 
shot with glycerine was very much larger than 
the flow from the wells shot with powder and 
the glycerine wells held up longer in flow than 
the others. Besides glycerine was not so ex- 
pensive. 

The line method of exploding the firing head 
was used until 1874, when the sand tamper was 



100 PER CENT ADVANCE 



An advance of not less than 100 per cent will be made on Duchess 
stock within a few days. The allotment of 100,000 shares was oversub- 
scribed. The second allotment of 50,000 shares is almost gone. 

The stock of the American Duchess Oil Company will advance to 
TEN CENTS PER SHARE on DECEMBER 5th, 1904. The first 
allottment of 100,000 shares was over-subscribed and only a small amount 
of stock is left of the second allottment at five cents per share. In order to 
secure some of this stock at this low price, it is advisable to wire at once, 
as all orders by wire will take preference over mail matter. 

Investors who reserved blocks of stock by wire and then investigated, 
in every instance took the stock. Orders as high as 10,000 shares have 
been filled by wire. Shrewd investors realize that Duchess stock at five 
cents per share is the best investment to be had in any company at any price. 

A full description ad may be found in this paper on page 15, issue 
of November 5th. 

The land of the Duchess Company is proven. The management is 
of the best and has been endorsed by a great number of the best oil and 
mining papers. A good paying WELL was found in the first sand, 
at the depth of 800 feet. The oil was temporarily cut off. They are now- 
drilling for the second sand. The well is over 1,200 feet deep in sandy 
shale carrying much oil anil tremendous gas pressure. The SECOND SAND 
WILL MEAN A IilC PRODUCTION OF 55 GRAVITY OIL THAT SELLS AT $3 

per BARREL. When tile well is finished we look for the stock to go to $1 
or more per share. The Duchess will be our next dividend-payer. Let 
us tell you about it. Write or wire for particulars. You had better wire 
and have a block of stock reserved. 



GOLDFIELD, NEVADA, 

THE GREATEST GOLDFIELD DISCOVERED 

IN RECENT YEARS. 

We are receiving many inquiries and subscriptions from those who 
desire to aid in promoting the company mentioned below. Our general 
manager leaves for Goldiield this week to start work upon the property. 
If you help promote this company, you will get a large block of stock at 
bottom prices and a square deal. 

We are organizing a company to develop a first-class property at Gold- 
field, Nevada. We will soon have 100 subscriptions of $100 each. Ten 
thousand dollars pays for the property with no indebtedness against the 
company and sufficient cash to start work. Half of the shares to be placed 
in the treasury. The other half will be divided among the promoters in 
even proportion to the amount of money invested. Parties putting in more 
than $100 will receive their pro rata of the shares. We will sell 
treasury shares to carry on rapid development. Here is a chance to get in 
at bottom prices. We subscribed $1000 and our friends within a few I 
subscribed $3000. We will have the full $10,000 within a few days. 

Join this promotion and get shares at the organization price. Coi 
will be handled by competent business men of San Francisco. 

LOOK INTO THIS BEFORE YOU BU7 ANY GOLD/, 
STOCKS. 

DEBENTURE SURETY COMPANY m 

Rialto Building, San Francisco, Cal. 
Use the Wires. It Pays. 



PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 



introduced. This was something; on the order of 
the modern "go devil." It was a bag of sand with 
a firing head in the bottom and this was dropped 
on the glycerine charge. The sand tamper was 
used for four years till in the fall of 1878 Cap- 
tain Sweatt used the first iron go devil at Knapps 
Creek in the Bradford field. This is the same 
go devil as is now used, with the firing head in 
the top, which explodes the whole charge at 
oiice. The go devil is just an iron weight wing 
shaped in a manner which is dropped on the 
glycerine. The cap is in the top of the go devil. 
Charges of glycerine for the purpose of de- 
veloping pools vary with the depth of the wells. 
The charge in Kansas is twenty to thirty-five 
quarts, while in the deeper districts of the East 
the average is a thousand quarts. The biggest 
charge ever shot in the country was one thousand 
and five quarts in one of the wells in the East 
Toledo (Ohio) field, and this shot was made 
within the last few weeks. 

In all the development of the Kansas fields 
there have been only two fatalities from the 
handling of glycerine, and both of these ' oc- 
curred in the southern end of the field. One 
shooter at Independence had an explosion and 
they were about three days finding his remains, 
and another shooter at Bartlesville had a sim- 
ilar experience. Whenever a glycerine shell ex- 
plodes there is no earthly use for a doctor. The 
coroner is the man to send for then. There is 
one man at Chanute who during the past twenty 
years in the Eastern fields and in this one has 
handled hundreds of thousands of quarts of 
glycerine and never an accident. A lady standing 
in a rig the other day asked him: "Mr. O'Hare, 
did -you ever have an accident while you were 
handling nitro-glycerine ?" To which the shooter 
said : "Madam, accidents never happen but once 
in this business." Four minutes after that there 
was a dull roar as of an approaching thunder- 
storm and a column of oil shot away over the 
derrick. The well was more than eight hundred 
feet deep and the force of the explosion was 
such that it raised a four-inch stream fifty feet 
above the top of. the timbers. 

The glycerine is made here and it is kept in 
magazines. The temperature in these magazines 
is always 80 degrees. None of the cities in the 
oil belt will allow a magazine within a certain 
distance of the town limts, to guard against an 
accidental stroke of lightning. For there is enough 
liquid destruction in any of these tanks at all 
times to blow any of the towns clear off the 
map. 

The glycerine is hauled from the magazine 
to the wells in a wagon constructed especially 
for the purpose. It is generally carried in a 
metal box and this is put in another box under 
the seat. The conical shells six or seven feet 
long are carried on the side of the wagon. The 
shells are not loaded till the shooter arrives at 
the well. _ To show the destructive power of 
the glycerine, after the shells have been drained 
into the wells they are exploded in the open 
field and the noise of this explosion can be heard 
for miles. The less than four ounces remaining 
make a noise louder than a salvo of artillery. 

No life insurance company and no accident 
insurance company issue a policy on a shooter. 
If he leaves anything behind it must be saved 
from his salary. And, strange to say, these men 
who toy with death every day of their lives are 
not richly paid. The average salary of a shooter 
is $125 per month. Of course, there are honor- 
ariums, such as hats and suits of clothes from 
the operators who have been lucky to get a better 
well than. most, but as an actual dependence the 
shooter has but little more to fall back upon 
than the average dry goods clerk, and the dry 



Flow of Natural Gas 
Increased by . . . 

Cooper's Gas Lift 

Also flow of water 
or oil Increased and 
gas saved 

A. S. COOPER, C.E., 



219 Crocker Building 
San Francisco, Cal. 

AT A BARGAIN. 

Standard Drilling Rig with full equipment of 
small tools. Boiler and engine in first-class con- 
dition. Address Exchange No. 21, care this 
journal. 



The 

Madero 

Rancho 

Consisting of 160 acres in Monterey 
county, 25 miles from tide water, 7 
miles from Kings City. 

Excellent Indications of Valuable 

Oil Deposits 

Timber on the property for fuel pur- 
poses. Good water supply. En- 
dorsed by principal experts in the 
country as valuable oil land. Must 
be sold at once. Title in fee simple. 
MRS. G. G. MADERO, 
Room 32, 318 Pine St., San Francisco. 



WANTED — Position as Superintendent of an 
oil company. Thirty years' experience in 
Pennsylvania, Ohio and California. Best of 
reference. Address, 

"PETROLEUM," care this paper. 



We Promote, Finance and Incorporate 

Let us show you the advantages of incorporating your business or enterprise. 
If you need money to enlarge your business, permit us to secure it for you, by selling 
stock through our Eastern correspondents. ■■ 

CONSOLIDATED AUDITING COMPANY 

307 to 310 Mills Building, San Francisco. ■ 
' Telephone Bush 849. 

WRITE US TO-DAY ! 
If you want to invest your money in a sound business proposition where you are sure 
to receive ten dollars for every one dollar invested 

BUY BUFFALO-CALIFORNIA OIL STOCK. 
This company is incorporated under a special act of Congress providing for the incor- 
poration of companies in the District of Columbia, making our stock absolutely non-assessable 
We hold some of the most valuable oil property in the well known 

HALFMOON BAY DISTRICT, 
San Mateo County, California, 
Now possessing many fine oil wells producing 52° to 55° gravity oil. But we cannot tell it all 
here. Write us for full particulars. 

Correspondence with reliable brokers and agents solicited. 

BUFFALO-CALIFORNIA OIL CO., 

Fletcher Block, 

Livermore, California. 



C. V. Hall Iron Works 

(LOCATION, OLINDA, ORANGE CO., CAL.) 

POSTOFFICB ADDRESS, Route No. 2, 
FULLERTON. CAL. 

Los Angeles Office, 222 Wilcox Building, 
LOS 'NGELES, CAL. 

The C. V. H. Chain Tongs can be had through 
any dealer in oil well supplies. 

These tongs are made of the very best steel, 
in any size, and always give satisfaction. 

Manufacturers or users of chain tongs do so 
at their own risk, in any infringements of 
Patent No. 438,177, the ownership of 
which belongs to the undersigned. 

CHARLES VICTOR HALL. 




PACIFIC OIL RKPOU 



■ 
latrd • Mall pieces. 

end 
of the eld have had their 

ith the nev which 

went into crtect during ri 

ire more than it the 

It has ! ided all the time that 

the oil produced at Chanute w .i< a^ good as tin- 
oil produced anywhere else in the field, but as no 
.or made of any quantity it was 
a doubtful question as to what the oil would 
grade when the Standard u:i> doing the grading. 
But the pipe line tickets of the Standard show 
that the greater portion of the oil produced in 
the Chanute district is above 32 degrees specific 
gravity, and this brings the top price ol S7 cents 
a barrel, which is equivalent to an advance of 20 
cents a barrel in price, as under the old scale 
Chanute oil graded as North Neodesha and was 
paid tor at the Hat rate of 07 cents a barrel. ( )i 

. the new scale will hurt companies in 
as there is heavy oil produced at 
various parts of the district, but on the whole it 
means more than $10,000 in the pnekets of the 
producers. The result has been that where here- 
tofore all of the plants were running half time 
and only producing enough to keep running, they 
are now all running full time and turning all 
rhe oil into the tanks which they can produce. 
And there has also been a remarkable picking up 
in trading and an advance in the price of leases. 
Several sales have been made during the past 
few days which were considered out of the ques- 
tion a few daj s ago. 

One great blessing of the new scale is that 
the producers and promoters in the southern end 
of the field who have been saying all the time 
that the oil produced at Chanute was not as 
good as that produced at Independence or Cherry- 
ville or any one of half a dozen other places will 
now have to take a back seat. In fact, the fig- 
ures sliow that the product of the Chanute wells 
is as good as thai of any other district in the 
State, and is only excelled by the districts in 
the Indian Territory. On the ridges east and 
west of town nearly every company profited 
largely by the new scale. On the Mundy trend 
and the Dildine trend the oil grades top and 
top prices are paid. The properties which will 
suffer some reduction have not been accurately 
located, as not all of the production has been 
run through the pipe line at the new scale. 

Reports from the southern districts show in- 
creased activity. The booms at Cleveland and 
Red Fork continue. Cleveland is a wide open 
town and the deep drilling there makes business 
for workers and supply houses. There are more 
than twenty rigs running at Red Fork and the 
production there is now reaching the Standard 
pipe line. The Tulsa-Red Fork Company has 
brought in more than eight wells and installed a 
power plant a few- days ago. The situation there 
is one of the development of properties leased 
long ago. Under the rulings of the Government 



FOR SALE. 



nal ( )il st. 

res Brookshire Oil st 

share. 

\V. I. BARNARD, 

renth Street, land. California 



BARGAIN 

Complete Oil Rig for Sale 



We manufacture the best 
lubricating oils for oil 
drillers 

KING KEYSTONE OIL CO., 
204 Front St., San Francisco. 



Including two String Toole 
and Fishing Tools 

Over 8000 leet of casing Id good condi- 
tion — some never used — sizes, lis?, 
9 ; 's; 8 inch and 6 Inch drive pipe 

The Above Property 
Cost Over $10,000 

and Is for sale at a bargain 

Exchange No. 22 

Care this Publication 




the: 
KROHN 

WIRE ROPE SOCKET 

THE ONLY SOCKET USING A BALL CLUTCH 



LASTING QUALITIES UNEQUALLED 



PATENT 



CLUTCH 




DEVICE 



For Sale by ALL 

OIL WELL 5UPPLY HOUSES 



LLEWELLYN IRON WORKS 

SOLE MANUFACTURERS 

LOS ANGELES, CAL. 

Write for Circular 




The 

Name 

Determines 

the 

Quality 



F I T L E R'S 1 Oil Well Supply Co/s 



DRILLING 

CABLES 






Drilling Tools 
Engines & Supplies 
Pumping Outfits 



7f 



R. H. HERRON CO. 

509 Mission St. - SAN FRANCISCO 



The 

Name 

Determines 

the 

Quality 



PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 



it is difficult to get leases in the Creek nation. 
But at Cleveland in Oklahoma the same regula- 
tions prevail which are in effect in Kansas and 
therefore the speculative feature is rampant 
there. From a mere way station the town has 
now a population of more than two thousand, 
and all within seven weeks. 

There is also greatest activity at Paola. 
Ninety-two wells are down and thirty-six rigs 
are running. There are nine power plants at 
Paola ready to begin operations as soon as the 
pipe line can be constructed to that place. The 
area of developed territory there is more than 
fifteen miles long and four miles wide in places. 
Next to the Chanute pool it is the largest pool 
in the State. The wells there are very shallow, 
the deepest being only 525 feet and the shallow- 
est 342 feet, but production is large. The Stand- 
ard had a man in the district last week grading 
the product and he found that most of it ran 
as light as 32 degrees gravity, which will bring 
the top price. 

A. F. Robertson. 



SANTA MARIA 



Santa Maria, Cal., Nov. 22, 1904. 

One of the very new corporations to enter this 
district is the Barca Oil Company. It is com- 
posed entirely of prominent Santa Maria oil and 
business men, principal among whom are Messrs. 
J .B. Bonetti, S. Fleisher, S. A. Johnson, T. R. 
Finley, M. Grossmayer, C. F. Bramming and 
James Smith. 

The property of this company consists of a 
250-acre lease on the southeast corner of the Bar- 
ca tract adjoining the Grasiosa Oil Company's 
property on the west and being about a half-mile 
north of the celebrated Pruissima well of the 
Union Oil Company, which has been flowing 
about 500 barrels of oil daily for the past year. 
There is practically no doubt that the company's 
property is one of the very best tracts of oil land 
in this district. 

The lumber and necessary machinery will be 
on the ground shortly and it is the intention to 
begin drilling before the first of the year. 

Articles of incorporation were filed in Santa 
Barbara this week, being capitalized at $500,000, 
par value of shares $1.00 each. 

A limited amount of stock in the company 
has been placed on the market at 25 cents per 
share, and considering the way the local investors 
are taking ahold of the proposition, the allotted 
amount will be over subscribed before active 
drilling commences. 

The Todas Santas Oil Company on the Za- 
bella ranch are at present building roads, burn- 
ing brush, etc., preparing to start their No. 1. 

The Coblentz Oil Company is also building 
road and moving the lumber on the ground for 
its first well. 

The new Pennsylvania Oil Company expect 
to "spud in" during the week on their first well. 
This company's property is slightly off of the 
proven belt and much importance is attached to 
this well. It will either open up a vast amount of 
territory or prove that everything north of the 
present developed territory is not oil land. This 
company is starting with 18-inch pipe and is pre- 
pared to go 4,000 feet, if necessary. 

The Graciosa Oil Company's well No. 3 con- 
tinues to flow at the rate of about 900 barrels in 
24 hours. No. 2 still does its usual stunt of 425 
barrels. 

The Pinal Oil Company is at present shipping 
about B-vS90 barrels daily, being the production 



FRESNO COUNTY ABSTRACT COMPANY 

Incorporated Under the Laws of California January 21, 1901. 

Capital Stock $100,000.00 

FUL.L-Y PAID UP 

SEARCHERS OF RE CORDS AND CONVEYANCE 

Abstracts of Title Caref ully Compil ed at Reasonable Rates. 

NO. 1115 K ST., FRESNO, CAL 



BARGAINS 

IN 

Secondhand Boilers and Engines 

Also Oil Well Casing, all sizes 

All in First-Class Condition 
Address 

H. H. R. Care this Paper 



Real Estate 
Insurance 



Oil Lands 

N. L. PALMER 

NOTARY PUBLIC 
COALINGA, = - = - CAL 



ALWAYS FIRST: 



Ever had trouble in getting the size 
of casing or drive pipe you needed? 



TRY USi 



We can help you. We carry ALL the regular 
i sizes and the following specials: 



10 

9 S /s 

7 "4 



A 1 /* 

7 

5 

2 

3 



inch Boston " Diamond B" Casing 42 pounds 

" 34 



• 35 
.30^ 
.24^ 
.20 

.17 

• 9 39 



" Drive Pipe 23.27 

" 14.50 

" Tubing 4^ 

" 8}4 



Don't you think we can suit you? 



THE NATIONAL SUPPLY COMPANY 

Los Angeles, San Francisco, Bakersfield, 
(Vic Kittrick, Coalinga, Santa Maria. 



PACIFIC OIL REPOR 



from : • three 
■ >n the heani by the tirst ot the 

Ha t well, are 

r ami exjx ito the 

Western I nion < >il Company finished up 

well and is 
now pun ; liarrrls daily. 

It i> stated In verj good authority that the 

Recruit Oil Company k <>il in its well 

■ m. This well is about six miles from 

am producing well, ami it the rumor is true, it 

opens up considerable territory. 

Tlu- Radium < >il Company went into the shale 
during the week in No. 1 at a depth of 635 feet. 
This company has had considerable trouble get- 
through the top sand, being obliged to use 
three strings ot pipe, hut as it is now in the shale 
with 1 0-inch pipe it bids fair of going into the 
oil with its 8-inch pipe. 



Petroleum Trade in Aden, 
Arabia 



(From United States Consul Masterson, Aden, 
Arabia.) 

There is not an article of commerce regularly 
shipped from the United States to Aden that 
does not show an increased sale during the last 
ten years, except petroleum, which shows a de- 
crease of nearly half a million gallons per year; 
vet the annual consumption is as great, if not 
greater, than it was ten years ago. The records 
of the port ihow that during the year ended 
March 31, 1895, there were imported into Aden 
479,896 gallons of American oil, valued at 
$66,013, and of Russian oil, 88,320 gallons, "val- 
ued at $11,091. The records for the year ended 
March 31. 1904, show that there were imported 
only 58,056 gallons of American oil, valued at 
$12,209; hut that 680,317 gallons of Russian 
oil, valued at $107,316, were imported. This 
wonderful decrease in the sale of American and 
the corresponding increase in the sale of Rus- 
sian petroleum were brought about, not so much 
because of a difference in quality of the two oils, 
for the American product is far superior, as that 
the Russian oil is only about one-half the price 
of the American product, and to a native it an- 
swers the same purpose. 

The native oil lamps are of tin, made to hold 
about a Dint of oil, and a round wick with no 
chimney ; s used. No matter what kind of oil 
is used in such a lamp the effect is very poor., 
as the light obtained is small, yellowish and 
smoky, and to get such a light as this, which 
answers -very purpose, the cheap Russian does 
as well as the higher-priced American oil. In 
the houses of the Europeans and in the shops 
in Aden only the American oil is used, but in 
the houses of the natives, not only in the city 
but pretT generally through the interior, the 
Russian oil is burned, and with such conditions 
I do not well see how a change can be effected. 

Petroleum, whether Russian or American, 
comes in five-gallon tins, two cans being packed 
in a wooden case. This makes a most convenient 
package for rehandling and distribution, whether 
by caravan or shipment in native boats, and the 
use of kerosene has now become so general 
throughout the interior that candles are seldom 
used. 

The banner year for the shipment of petroleum 
to this nort was that ended March 31, 1897, 
when 536,724 gallons of American oil, valued 
at $82,029, and 379,826 gallons of Russian, val- 
ued at $62,235, were imported. 



WESTERN COOPERAGE CO. 

MANUnACTURnUX OF 

STAVES and HEADING 

For Both Tliht nnd SlncL \V„rU. 
OUR SPECIALTIES ARE: 

WhiteSpruceSaves and Heading Fir T ight Barrel States and 
all ready to set up tor Fish, Heading lor Oil, Lard, Pork, 
Pickles or Lard packages ol , Bee( E(c [t|! 
any size. H ' 'ooo 

Fir Slack Barrel Staves and Heading for Asphalt, Lime 
Cement and Bottle Barrels. 



Prompt and Courteous Attention to alt Inquiries. 



MILLS at Aberdeen, Wash, and Houlton, Ore. 



SMITH, EMERY & CO. 

CHEMICAL ENGINEERS 
"TECHNICAL OIL. WORK 



ANALYSIS Or- 

Solublc Suits, 
Coal, Coke. 



Petroleum, 
Asphalt, 

Residues, Feed Waters, 

Sulphur. Drinking Waters, 

Gypsum, Minerals, Etc. 



Umpire Work on Oil Contracts. 
Chemical and Physical Laboratories. 



83-85 New Montgomery Street 
SJtN FRJtMClSCO, CJU. 



Lacy Manufacturing Company 



Manufacturers of 




Steel Water Pipe 
General Sheet 
Iron Works 
Oil Well Casing 
Oil Stills 

OIL STORAGE AND WAGON TANKS 

Works: Cor. New Main and Date streets, P. O. Box 231, Station C. 

Baker Block Telephone Main 196 

Office, 334 North Main Street, Los Angeles, Cal. 

BATES' 

PATENT CASING TONGS 




1416-1426 19th St., Bakersfield. Cal. 



Fills a long-felt want. No more need of 
pole and rope for screwing up casing. Bates 
Tongs can be applied to the casing anywhere 
in driving or pulling without danger of Injury 
or parting casing. 

Set No. 1, with any two size jaws from o$4 
to 13^ inches. 

Set No. 2, with any two size jaws fro*n 4 to 
9f4 inches. 




CAR TANKS AND STORAGE TANKS 

FOR ALL USES 

We Carry in Stock Car Tanks of following sizes: We Carry in Stock Storage Tank s for Oil 

6,000 Gallons 
7,000 " 
8,000 " 

and can mount on wood or steel underframes. 



of all sizes up to and including 
S5.000 BARRELS 

Oil Refineries Complete Our Specially 



WARREN OITV BOILER WORKS 

OFFICE and WORKS:-WARREN, OHIO. 



H 



PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 



CALIFORNIA STOCK AND OIL EX- 
CHANGE. 



The following were stock sales in the Califor- 
nia Stock and Oil Exchange in the formal sessions 
held for the week ending Tuesday, November 22 : 
Associated Stock — 

2,000 shares at $ .25 

Forty Oil— 

3,200 shares at 40 

Four Oil — 

600 shares "at .55 

Home Oil — 

300 shares at .55 

200 shares at 59 

Independent Oil — 

1,300 shares at .32 

1,100 shares at .33 

Monte Cristo Oil — 

900 shares at 75 

2,100 shares at 77j^ 

Oil City Petroleum — 

6,200 shares at 58 

1,000 shares at 59 

1 ,300 shares at 60 

Soverign Oil — 

200 shares at 32 

400 shares at .33 

Thirty -Three Oil — 

150 shares at 6.00 

Twenty-Eight Oil — 

100 shares at 11.00 

Following are the latest quotations for stocks 
of oil companies listed on the California Stock 
and - Oil Exchange : 

- Bid. Asked. 

Alma 60 

Apollo .42 

Ass. Oil Co. Stk. Tr. Cer. .24 .26 

Aztec 60 

California-Standard -. .18.. 

Caribou 5.50 6.00 

Central Point Con 72 

Chicago Crude 22 

Claremont 80 .85 

Coalinga & Pacific 35 

Forty ' 39 .40 

Four 55 

Giant 23 ' 

Hanford 185.00 

Home 50 .52 

Homestake 6.50 

Illinois Crude .70 

Imperial 12.00 16.50 

Independence 35 

Junction 14 

Kern 4.75 

Kern (New) .30 

Maricopa .20 

McKittrick .10 

Monarch of Arizona 25 .30 

Monte Cristo 75 

Occidental of W. Va 04 

Reed Crude 2.00 2.50 

S. F. & McKittrick 3.00 

Senator 70 

Soverign 31 .33 

Sterling 2.00 

Superior 07 

Teck 1.10 

Thirty-Three 5.00 8.25 

Twenty-Eight 11 .00 

Union 50.00 

United Petroleum 95 . 00 

Wolverine 40 .50 



H 



PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 

is the only 

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Published on the 

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' It gives full, fresh and authentic oil news from 
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fraudulent oil companies. It gives the latest 
Information on oil stocks and dividends. It 
describes the latest method of drilling wells, 
pumping, piping and storing oil; use of oil for 
road making, etc. 

It is the only paper which advocates the belie) 
that California's refined asphalt is the equal 
of Trinidad asphalt for paving and other pur- 
poses, and is in every way superior to bitumi- 
nous rock, the use of which has given San 
Francisco, Oakland and other California cities 
so many poor streets. 

The subscription price is $2. 50 a year. If you 
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PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 



Vol. 6. No. 5 



PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 



San Francisco, Cal., Saturday, Dec. 3, 1904 



Price Ten Cents 



Published Weekly. 

The Oil Authority of the Pacific Coast 

Endorsed by California Petroleum Miners' Ass'n. 



M \RIA R. WINN. Proprietor.. 
EASTMAN, Editor and Manager. 



OFFICE AND EDITORIAL ROOMS 

318 Pine Street - - San Francisco, California 
Telephone, Bush 176. 



TERMS. 

On* Year 12 BO 

Six Month* 1 BO 

Three Months 1 00 

Single Copies 10c 

STRICTLY IN ADVANCE. 

Money should be sent by Postal Order. Draft or 
Registered Letter, addressed to Pacific Oil Reporter, 
118 Pine Street. San Francisco, rooms 31-82-33. Com- 
munications must be accompanied by writer's name 
and address, net necessarily for publication, but as 
a guarantee of good faith. 

Entered In the PostofHce at San Francisco, Cali- 
fornia, as second class matter. 



Latest Quotations 



Following are the latest quotations for Cali- 
fornia crude oil at the wells: 

COALINGA. 

Prices 
Gravity at 60° temperature. per barrel. 

Oil of 22° up to but not including 24° . . . .20 
Oil of 24° up to but not includ 
' Oil of 25° up to but not includ 
Oil of 26° up to but not including 27° 
Oil of 27" up to but not including 28° . 
Oil of 28° up to but not including 29° . 
Oil of 29° up to but not including 30° . 
Fuel oil, 14 degrees gravity or better. 

KERN. 

Fuel oil, 14 degrees gravity or better. 



ng25 c 

ng26° 



.30 
.35 

.40 
.45 
.50 
.55 
.15 

.15 



KANSAS-INDIAN TERRITORY. 

Oil of 32 degrees gravity $0.87 

Oil of 3\V 2 degrees gravity 82 

Oil of 31 degrees gravity 77 

Oil of 30J-2 degrees gravity 72 

Oil of 30 degrees gravity . .' 67 

Oil of 29J/2 degrees gravity 62 

Oil of 29 degrees gravity 57 

Oil of 281/2 degrees gravity 52 

Oil of 28 degrees gravity 47 

EASTERN QUOTATIONS. 

Pennsylvania 1 .56 

Tiona 1-71 

Corning 1.33 

New Castle 1.43 

North Lima 1-05 

South Lima 1.00 

Indiana • 1.00 

Corsicana, light 85 

Corsicana,' heavy 50 

Somerset 1.01 

Ragland 60 

Petrolea (Ont.) 1.53 

TEXAS. 

Beaumont 35 

Sour Lake 35 

Saratoga 35 

Batson 33 



SANTA MARIA. 
ity at 60° itarrcl 

Temperature. 

2 s up to hut not including 26° $ .50 

26 up to hut not including 27" 55 

ip tn hut not including 28° 60 

28 up to hut not including 29° 65 

29 up to hut not including 30° 70 

30 up to but not including 31° 75 

3 I up to hut not including 32° 80 

32 and up 85 

RETAIL. 

Kerosene, Pearl, per gal., 19' Uc; Astral, 
i'i> L c; Star, ioUe; Extra Star, 24c; Eocene, 
23c; Elaine, 26c; Water White, in bulk, 13c; 
do 150 deg., 13c; do, extra fine, 15c; Mineral 
Seal, iron bbls., 18c; wooden bbls., 20V2C; do, 
cs., 24c; Deodorized Stove Gasoline, in bulk, 
:6c; do, in cs., 22 1 ,a,c; 86 deg. Gasoline, in bulk, 
25c; cs., 31c; 83 deg. Naphtha or Benzine, de- 
odorized, in bulk, per gal., 13c; do, in cs., igl/oc. 



Parties recently returning from the Kayak, 
Alaska, district, claim that the field has proven 
an absolute failure as far as the production of 
oil is concerned. Altogether sixteen wells have 
been drilled during the season, all of which have 
been failures. The two wells claimed to have 
been brought in oil wells a year ago are still 
furnishing enough oil to fire two or three boilers. 
This oil was found in a shale formation. It is 
claimed that an earthquake which visited that 
section some two or three years ago must have 
crevised the oil stratum enough to allow the oil 
to escape from the sand, which was struck in 
all of the sixteen wells. This sand is said to 
show traces of oil. As a coal field the district is 
surpassing every expectation, the main setback be- 
ing the lack of a suitable harbor. The coal in- 
dustry, however, is not a very attractive one on 
the Pacific Coast at this time, the low price of 
fuel oil putting a damper on almost anything in 
this line. We look for no early development of 
the Kayak coal fields although a change from 
present conditions might make them very valuable. 
The rapid development of the Santa Maria field 
in this State is keeping the attention of capi- 
talists pretty well at home. 



From private resources that we know to be 
absolutely reliable, we have learned that dur- 
ing the week a well has been brought in on the 
Western Union property at Santa Maria that 
eclipses every other well in the field. Of late 
every new well drilled has proven to be just a 
little better than the last one, but No. 21 of 
the Western Union is going to be more than 
. a nine days' wonder in oil circles. The well 
was finished up at about 3,600 feet with three- 
inch tubing. With the stopcock only about half 
open the well is now doing more than 100 bar- 
rels an hour with tremendous gas pressure. Es- 
timates have placed the capacity of the well 
all the way from 3,000 barrels a day up. One 
thing is certain, it is now doing 2,400 barrels 
daily and the operators know that when the 



I i- open full the 
tull capacitj of the pipe with no let up in 

Three thousand bai re! 
a verj conservative estimate of the well and it 

>> .'i\\a\ beyond this figure. Thi 
tune ut this companj .nines .1 
more than tour years' of development work dur 
ing which twentj wells were drilled. Seven 
ol them have a capacitj (U less than eight 
hundred battels daily. The other three were 
failure--. The Western I nion is the pioneer 
company of the Santa Maria field and it litis 
expended above $100,000 in the development of 
its property without marked success until the 
bringing in of No. 21. It is probable that till of 
its 20 shallow wells, ranging from 1,000 to 1,600 
feet, will now be deepened. Prominent Los 
Angeles gentlemen are interested itj the 
pany. 



After giving Uinta county, Wyoming, oil op- 
erators four years in which to prove the worth 
of the Union Pacific grant as oil land, the 
Interior Department has rendered its decision 
in the negative. All land included in the orig- 
inal grant to the railroad company from the 
government has been awarded the former. This 
finally settles the many contest cases pending 
since the discovery of oil at Spring Valley, which 
started an oil boom, which resulted in many 
filings being made on land that had not been 
patented by the railroad company. The decision 
is rather a hard blow to the Uinta county field 
as the main issue was whether or not oil had 
been discovered in commercial quantities. The 
Interior Department, in rendering its decision 
in the case, has plainly said that no such dis- 
covery has been made. Considerable California 
capital has been expended in the Uinta county 
field; in fact practically all the development 
there has been done by two corporations backed 
by California capitalists. It is conservatively es- 
timated that nearly $200,000 has been expended 
by these two concerns in an attempt to secure 
a production from the field. Oil was struck in 
some eight or ten wells but at the hearing the 
Interior Department could not be convinced that 
any of them produced oil in commercial quan- 
tities, or that the total amount from all of them 
would make an apparent production. Over half 
of 'the wells in which a showing of oil was en- 
countered are located on land conceded to the 
Union Pacific, and, according to the decision, 
all these improvements accrue to the property 
contested. As the railroad land embraced only 
the odd-numbered sections and the field is very 
extensive, there is plenty of room for the Wyom- 
ing operators to make good their claims of an 
oil field, but this will have to be done before 
outside capital will be much attracted. We 
are sorry for our California investors who were 
induced to invest in railroad land in this field, 
but as they are all gentlemen of means 
will feel it less than some of the Eastern in- 
vestors. At present the field is in the grip of the 
"Frost King," but we fear it has received a chill 
from other sources from which it may never 
recover. We understand the esteemed gentle- 
man who first started the boom and who at the 
tiine posed in San Francisco as a capitalist, is 
now digging water wells in Kansas. 



PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 



Natural Gas 

j& j£? By A. S. CO 



in California 

OPER, M. E. j£> J& 



No. IX. 

SANTA CLARA VALLEY AND SUISUN FAULTS. 
GAS IN SANTA CLARA COUNTY. 

The following records of the wells drilled 
on the Mean estate, seven and one-half miles 
south of San Jose, were given by R. C. Mc- 
Pherson : 

Well No. 1 , slate to 83 feet ; brown shale and 
gas to 134 feet (gas burned at top of well from 
'160 to 170 feet) ; hard shale gas from 415 to 
422 feet; hard gray sand and gas, 508 to 513 
feet; strong flow of gas. Well drilled in 1892. 
Well No. 2, 136 to 153 feet, brown shale and 
gas. Well No. 3, 112 to 141 feet, coarse gravel 
and sand, with gas and oil, 478 to 490 feet, gray 
sand with strong flow of gas. At 490 feet gas 
raised water over the derrick. Gray sand and 
more gas to 505 feet; brown shale, with more 
gas to 574 feet. Drilled in 1896-97. 

The largest and most extensive of these 
swamps is Laguna Seca, about fourteen miles 
south of San Jose, and approximately 200 feet 
above the city. Mr. Polhemus has sunk a large 
well (about ten feet square) through nineteen 
feet of soil and clay into a gravel bed, ascer- 
tained by boring to be 45 feet thick and under- 
laid by clay. The amount of water obtained 
from the well is large. 

Along the western side of the Santa Clara 
Valley there seems to exist a fault which has 
caused the bed of the valley to have a decided 
dip to the west. From Laguna Seca on the 
south, to the willows in San Jose, there are a 
series of small swamps (some during the entire 
year; others only in winter or spring) that form 
natural storage reservoirs. One of these, about 
three miles south of the town has been drained 
by the city and county jointly. 

At several places spurs from the western side 
of the valley run into the valley, across the line 
of swamps, thus increasing the storage capacity 
of those above them. 

From San Jose south, there is a continuous 
rise in the valley from eighty feet at San Jose 
to nearly 300 feet at Madrone station. 

In Contra Costa and Solano Counties a fis- 
sured fault is shown at Byron Springs, thence 
passing near and southwest of Brentwood, about 
two miles west of Antioch, southwest of the 
Montezuma Hills, northeast of the Potero Hills 
and near and southwest of the aragonite depos- 
its, which are now being used for the manufac- 
ture of cement. 

The great uplift of the Coast Ranges with 
the subsequent denudation have, at the eastern 
side of the tule marshes of the Suisun bay, 
brought within easy reach strata which must 
otherwise have remained utterly inaccessible. At 
this place porous strata carrying artesian water 
with gas in solution may be obtained at a few 
hundred feet that may lie buried several thou- 
sand feet at the cities of Stockton and Sacra- 
mento. 

The outcrops of tertiary strata on the eastern 
side of the Great Valley which underlie the un- 
consolidated beds of the Valley, generally have 
an altitude of 200 feet or more. This altitude 
would probably exert a hydrostatic pressure 
that would cause the water to flow at sea level 
on the west side of the valley. 

The upward flow of water near the line of 



this fault, which rises to the surface through 
porous beds and fissures, would be largely in- 
creased if the head of water was removed from 
artesian wells bored in them. 

When wells are sunk near the line of this fault 
water that contains gas in solution and which 
rises as springs in various places, will, in the 
immediate vicinity of the wells, be drawn to 
them. 

Water containing gas in solution is forced up- 
wards through porous and seamed strata near 
the line of this fault from unaltered strata of 
the Great Valley by hydrostatic pressure. A 
large proportion of the hydrostatic pressure in 
the Great Valley tends to urge the subterranean 
waters toward this fault. 

The Rochester well is situated east of Suisun, 
Solano County, in Sec. 24, T. 5 N., R. 1 W., 
S. B. M. & Base. It is 1,600 feet deep and is 
cased with a six-inch pipe. It flows about 750,000 
gallons (estimated) of warm salt water in twen- 
ty-four hours, and 100,000 cubic feet of natural 
gas by measurement. The following is an 
analysis of the gas: 

Carbonic acid 06 

Illuminents 00 

Oxygen 02 

Carbonic oxide 00 

Hydrogen . 2.18 

Marsh gas (methane) 93 .30 

Nitrogen ^ . 44 

Total 100.00 

Containing but a small amount of nitrogen, 
it is one of the best natural gases that is obtained 
so far in California. By artificial means this 
well could be made to produce from 200,000 
to 500,000 cubic feet of gas daily instead of 
100,000. 

It is reported that a quarter of a mile west 
of the Rochester well natural gas exhales from 
the surface of the ground in a number of places. 

In townships 5 north, ranges 1 west and 1 
east, Mount Diablo, Base and Meridian there 
are a number of subsidences each covering an 
area from five to eighty acres. As has been 
experienced heretofore, these subsidences create 
avenues for the ascent of natural gas from places 
where it is generated. In the winter time these 
subsidences are filled with water, forming shal- 
low lakes. If embankments were made around 
these lakes to prevent the rain water from flow- 
ing into them they could be used to evaporate 
by solar heat the brine flowing from the wells. 
The brine would be condensed, which would 
produce salt when further evaporated by heat 
obtained from the natural gas which flows from 
the wells with the brine. 

In the vicinity of Potero Hills, in a bored well 
and also escapes with water from numerous 
springs in the tide-water lands. M. Allen's 
rancho, Sec. 2, T. 4 N., R. 1 W., seven miks 
east of Suisun, at tide level, natural gas escapes 
with water from twenty or more places. 

E. P. Hilborn's well. It is in the head of a 
narrow anticlinal valley in the Potero Hills, four 
miles southeast of Suisun. It is eight inches in 
diameter, 100 feet deep, and said to flow 2,400 
cubic feet daily. When lighted at the mouth 
of the well it burns constantly. The strata pene- 
trated are principally sand, which fills the val- 



ley. The hard underlying shales are not reached. 

A number of gas springs are situated in the 
tide-water lands immediately to the south of 
Potero Hills. In three places large quantities of 
gas cause the ebullition of water flowing from 
large springs, and have washed out basins, one 
of which was about 100 feet in diameter, and 
is thirty feet deep at low tide. Another spring 
is dry in the summer, and but little gas is given 
off because there is no flow of water. In the 
winter it flows water and gives a large flow of 
gas. Other gas springs exist in the tule marsh. 
These gas and water springs are in the only 
outlet to the ocean of surface or subetranean 
water of the Great Valley, and must be very 
large. Many millions of cubic feet of gas must 
rise near this point and have been doing so for 
many hundreds of years. 

These springs lie immediately east of the up- 
lifted marine strata that formed the colossal 
dam that held back the waters that once crossed 
the Great Valley, forming an inland bay. These 
strata dip towards the Great Valley. 

A large amount of water with gas in solution 
should be obtained by shallow wells in this vi- 
cinity. 

There is no reason why the natural gases of 
these valleys should not be employed within these 
valleys and within thirty miles of the same to 
furnish all the illuminating, heating and power 
that may be required and at such prices that 
neither coal or other fuels can compete. 

In speaking of the Byron Springs in Contra 
Costa, W. Anderson says: 

"During my visit to the sanitarium in 1889, 
I counted more than fifty springs or outlets from 
subterranean passages. Some are cold and others 
are hot, ranging from 50 to 140 degrees F. 
Within a few feet of each other there will be a 
cold carbonated spring and a hot sulphureted 
spring. The whole basin has the appearance 
of being an extinct volcanic crater. The cold 
soda springs come from the surface water, but 
the hot sulphurous must come from consider- 
able distance down in the earth's crust. Chem- 
ical metamorphosis could probably not produce 
the amount of heat found at Byron." 

There are several inflammable gas wells or 
springs, two of which have been developed by 
sinking about thirty feet and erecting small re- 
ceivers over them. I burned the gas for fif- 
teen or more minutes and found it to consist 
largely of carbareted hydrogen. The supply 
seems inexhaustible, amply sufficient to heat and 
light the entire resort. 

Near the line of this fault there is an aragon- 
ite deposit that at least equals nine cubes of 100 
feet square, and which has unquestionably been 
deposited from springs having lime in solution. 

Seven billion pounds of carbonic acid was 
necessary to put this amount of lime in solu- 
tion. This carbonic acid was probably pro- 
duced by the burning of lime by metamorphic 
heat. An idea of the immense amount of dif- 
ferent gases generated below and escaping 
through this fault can be imagined from this 
computation. 

Southwest of this deposit are the Tolenas 
Springs, at which large deposits of aragonite 
are found, and which are still being found, is an 
evidence of the present generation of carbonic 
acid and that other gases are being formed prob- 
ably in equally as large amounts. The car- 
bonic acid in combination with lime and in solu- 
tion with water seeking one point of escape and 
the gases, carbureted and sulphurated hydrogen 
another. 



II EC OIL I- 



THe Staying Qualities of 
Oil Wells. 



Petroleum it- nt as the hills, but 

the wells play out, ami eternal drilling is the price 

ding the production up to bruise whist pitch, 

writes John J. McLaurin in the < )il City Derrick. 

ill's well that ends well" cannot 

be applied to the oil well of the period. 

rigentum, Sicily, had oil-lights 100 15. C 
I of "oil in lamps" A. I). 17^. 
Oil lighted Genoa and Parma A. D, 1' 

rleroix heard of oil at Cuba. N. Y., lt>42. 
David Leisberger saw oil at Tionesta, 1767. 

W'm. I nine noticed oil on Oil creek, 

First Oil-creek crude in Pittsburg, 1797. 
First oil-salt wells in West Virginia, 1808. 
First nil-salt wells :ii Tarcntum, Pa.. 1809. 
.1. McKee, Marietta, < ).. found oil, 475 feet, 
1SI4. 

Beatty. Wayne county, Kentucky, lirst spouter, 
ISIS. 

American. Cumberland county, Kv\. flowed 
1829. 

S. M. Kier. Pittsburg, distilled crude, 1846. 
Adolph Schreiner, refined "earth oil," 1853. 
Drake "tapped the mine" Aug. 28, 1859. 
Evans, Franklin's lirst well, Novomher, 1859. 
The final abandonment last June of the Gealy 

No. 1 well, in Clinton township, Venango 
county, Pa., recalls the interesting fact that the 
departed veteran floated the Bullion field on its 
dizzy voyage. This notable venture, located on 
the Geo. \V. Gealy farm, two miles from Ken- 
nerdell station, tapped the jugular on August 
9, 1876, to the tune of 175 barrels per day. John 
Taylor and Robert Gundle, who had secured a 
lease from Gealy and drilled the well, at once 
disposed of their holdings to Phillips brothers, 
whose confidence in the district numerous dusters 
failed to shake. Forthwith the current set in 
toward the new spouter, which surprised nobody 
more than the lucky owners. Paying wells were 
found at the mouth of Scrubgrass creek, three 
miles away, in 1867; but Jonathan Watson's two 
dry holes on the Kennerdell lands in 1871, fol- 
lowed by the Phillips dusters on adjacent farms, 
had given the neighborhood a severe wrench. H. 
L. Taylor and John Satterfield, the biggest oper- 
ators in Butler, drove up from Fetrolia, inspect- 
ed the gusher and promptly offered $500,000 for 
the Phillips interests in the township. Scores 
of oil men stood watching the flow that August 
morning. The principals consulted briefly, after 
which Isaac Phillips invited me to walk with 
him a short distance. He said: "Taylor & Sat- 
terfield wish to take our property at a half mil- 
lion dollars. This is a good deal of money, but 
we have declined it. We believe there will be 
twice that for us if we develop the field our- 
selves." They carried out this resolution and the 
estimate was approximated closely. 

The initial strike kept above the 100-barrel 
mark for weeks. Adjoining farms were oper- 
ated in short metre, the Sutton, Simcox, Taylor, 
Henderson, Davis, Newton and Berringer pan- 
ning out handsomely. Phillip's No. 3, near 
Gealy No. 1 set off at 400 barrels. Emerson & 
Brownson's No. 1, Taylor farm, gauged 700 
barrels at the outset. In January, 1877, Frank 
Nesbit's No. 2, Henderson farm, tipped the 
beam at 500 barrels. Big Medicine, Newton 
farm, put into the tank 1,000 barrels on June 7. 
Mitchell & Lee's Big Injun flowed 3,300 bar- 
rels on June 18, the largest in the diggings. Ten 
rods away a galaxy of Franklinites bored the 
driest kind of a dry hole. The spouters ex- 
hausted speedily. Oil from Gealy No. 1 was 



haul.-. 

laid to the 

in which a few shriveled 

barrels daily, extended several miles in 
and three-eights of a mile in width. Like the 
business end of a healthy wasp, it was little, 
It swerved the i from Brad- 
ford ami ruled the petroleun 
months. Summit City, on the Simcox farm, 
Berringer City on the Hem. . and I leane 

City on the McGalmont farm, flourished during 
the excitement. The first house at Summit was 
built on December S. IS7n. [ n June of 1S77 
the town boasted 220 buildings and 1500 popula- 
tion. Ahram Myers, the last resident, left in 

April of 1SS". All three towns have "faded into 
nothingness" and of the 550 wells producing at 
the summit oi Bullion's short-lived prosperity 

not a dozen survive. Westward ,i new .trip of 
second-sand territorj has com,' t,, the front, the 
wells averaging small and lasting nicely. Now 
the parent of the defuncl reg has been re- 
tired for keeps, having rounded our an existence 
of twenty-seven years and ten months. 






S6e Standard Oil Company 
and the Austrian Petro- 
leum Producers. 



In one of its last financial supplements the 
Times criticised the operations of the Austro- 
Hungarian petroleum agreement and says that 
this must base its interest chiefly upon the in- 
land sale since, according to the view of this 
organ, the approximate 10,000 cisterns of refined, 
which will he exported to Germany in the course 
of the year, must be disposed of at lower prices 
in competition with the Standard. The fight in- 
troduced between Mr. Rockefeller and the Aus- 
tro-Hungarian agreement will probably end 
with a compromise, but it is barely probable that 
the conculsion of this compromise will be de- 
ferred until the Americans offer more favorable 
conditions than they have heretofore proposed. 
The Standard has offered, so it appears, to take 
the entire production of Galecian petroleum for 
a specified number of years -at certain prices, un- 
der the condition that the Austro-Hungarian pro- 
ducers "cease to exist in the eyes of the con- 
sumers." Thereby was danger presented, in that 
the Standard could resign at the end of the con- 
tract after attaining control of the market, with 
the explanation that they no longer need the 
Austrian petroleum, which would ruin the Ga- 
lician producers. Then the Standard would be 
in a position to buy up the wells and refineries al- 
most at their own figures. 

At present the agreement only includes the 
export to Germany, although no profit arises 
therefrom except to bring loss to its competitors. 
To the 9,500,000 meter centners of petroleum 
imported into Germany the Standard contrib- 
utes about 8,000,00. The rest is divided be- 
tween Austria-Hungary, Russia and Roumania. 
In order to maintain its position on the German 
market the Standard is compelled to make its 
price about three marks per meter centner less 
than it would place the same if the situation were 
different. For this reason the Standard has lost 
1,200,000 pounds sterling on its import, amount- 
ing to 8,000,000 meter centners. For the pur- 
pose of ruining its competitors the American 
trust has suppressed half of the wholesale mer- 
chants where possible, and reckons upon the 
profit obtained from retail to maintain its com- 



.r buys thi 

and sells 
naturally has an interest in trading with the 
light. 

leum hum hctter and has 
odOT than the Russian or 
theless, thi (ungarian mariul 

making every effort to extend their sales ;, n J arc 
supported therein by the very effective help of 
half of the wholesale merchants who vveiv exclud- 
ed bj the Standard. The actual question now is: 
Will the Americans force the case to the utmost 
or make new propositions for agreement with the 
Austro-Hungarian interests. It is searceK 
sarj to add that the Austrian and Hungarian 
rnment will watch attentively over every 
agreement which is made in orde* to ward off 
d.inger which would result from the interfer- 
ence of foreign capital with one of the youngest 
and most flourishing industries of the monarchy. 
The Hungarian Government offers special advan- 
tages to the refiners, who advance tinder these 
conditions to the erection of new establishments 
in Hungary. The question which concerns the 
petroleum industry will surely be a subject for 
debate in the Hungarian imperial diet if the 
trade agreement concluded between Austria and 
Hungary comes to he considered. — Naptha. 



Cost of Fuel Oil. 



A San Francisco correspondent, writing to a 
London paper on petroleum conditions in Cali- 
fornia, says that there is some difference of opin- 
ion as to the cost of pumping oil; in other words, 
after 3'ou have bought your land, sunk your wells, 
put up all your machinery, tanks, etc., what does 
it cost you to put oil on the top of the ground? 
Of course, in this cost you have to include in- 
terest on the money invested and running ex- 
penses, superintendents, office, etc. We can see 
why there should be such a difference of opinion 
on this subject, as salaries and office expenses 
can be run up to any figure desired; but in a 
well-managed corporation, where salaries are no 
higher than they would be in any ordinary busi- 
ness, if I put it at 4 cents a barrel, I am satisfied 
that I am making it as high as it legitimately 
should be. Some of the best-managed companies 
do it at a much less figure, and these are the 
companies which pay dividends. 

As to the saving of oil over coal, we have been 
using it sufficiently long to get a very thorough 
knowledge, and when we say that we saved 50 
per cent, we are rather below than above the 
mark. The use of oil on steamships is increas- 
ing very rapidly, and there are now over 200 
marine boilers in use out of this port. The sav- 
ing there is much larger than on shore, as it in- 
cludes coaling, space for coal, which is utilized 
for freight, weight, which is one-third less; speed, 
which is increased more than half in labo 
fire-rooms, and the absence of dirt in the I 
of ashes, etc. I understand that Mr. Spr< :.. 
is saving in the neighborhood of $200 per 
on the steamer Mariposa, which run.: from 
Francisco to Tahiti, and that the speed has in- 
creased one knot an hour. When the railroads 
are prepared to use oil exclusively — in other 
words, when they have their tanks completed 
all along their road, which will take some littie 
time yet, perhaps by the end of this year, they 
will be using over 10,1 arrels per year. 



PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 



Interior Department to 
Investigate 



The Department of Commerce and Labor has 
ordered two inspectors to go into the field and 
investigate the oil business of the United States. 
Every oil field of California will be included and 
will be looked into. This movement on the part 
of the government has naturally been taken as 
an indication that President Roosevelt has decided 
to investigate the Standard Oil Company, and it 
has led to reports that there is bad feeling be- 
tween Mr. Roosevelt and the Rockerfellers. It 
can be stated upon absolute unimpeachable au- 
thority that these reports are incorrect. Roose- 
velt has already investigated the coal industry 
and the beef industry, and now, in obedience to 
a law passed by Congress in creating the Depart- 
ment of Commerce and Labor, he has commenced 
an investigation into the oil industry. 

In the course of that investigation the Stan- 
dard Oil Company will be reached, but there is 
no hostile purpose in the present move. If it is 



and where all that a young man had to do to 
get into society was to join the church or pur- 
chase a "top buggy." 

The population may at one time have hovered 
around the 5,000 mark, but at the time I speak 
of was composed mostly of empty houses. The 
few who did live there were either retired farm- 
ers, to whom the settlement looked like a city, 
or people who had never succeeded in getting 
enough "ready money" to get away. 

Away back in the '70's some of the people were 
drilling for coal and struck a slight flow of nat- 
ural gas. Gas was almost an unheard of thing 
at that time, so, after drilling another hundred 
feet no signs of coal appearing, they abandoned 
the hole. 

No more was thought about the incident un- 
til gas was discovered in Indiana. Some of the 
people in the little town of which I speak began 
to think that maybe it was gas they had struck. 
A company was organized and commenced drill- 
ing. In 1893 the first gas well of any import- 
ance was struck on Christmas day. 

That was little more than ten years ago. The 



ground a clear space of at least 100 feet shall 
be maintained between them and all parts of 
the risk; and where the ground slopes toward 
the propety they shall be inclosed in a substan- 
tial embankment forming a reservoir exceeding 
the capacity of the tanks. Tanks shall be so 
placed that the highest point in oil supply shall 
be below the furnace, where oil is burned or 
converted for burning. They shall have gas- 
tight manheads, steam pipes from boiler to top 
of tanks, overflow pipe from pump, standpipe or 
accumula f or to storage tank, indicator pipes and 
vent pipes; the latter, with copper gauze at top. 
extending ten feet above tank. If tanks are 
within fifty feet of building vent pipes should 
extend six feet above roof. 

The conveying of oil to the furnaces shall be 
by artificial pressure or suction, the feeding of 
oil by gravity or other means from a storage 
supply higher than the furnaces being expressly 
prohibited ; provided that oil may be fed to burn- 
ers from an iron standpipe or accumulator, hav- 
ing a caoacity not exceeding ten gallons, to be 
safely installed either inside or outside the build- 




California Fortune Oil Company's well No. 4 reflected in oblong reservoir of oil shown in back-ground of picture above. 



found that the Standard Oil Company is violating 
the law it will be made to get back within the 
law. 

Secretary Metcalf was asked about these re- 
ports and said: 

"There is, of course, no ulterior motive in any 
investigation we may undertake. We are not 
here to destroy business. The moment the 
American people come to the conclusion that we 
are here to destroy business, that moment this 
department had better shut up shop. We are 
here to encourage business, protect business and 
at the same time see that it is legally done by 
interstate corporations. We must do so under 
the law creating this department." 



Effect of a Gas Boom 



"Back in Kansas," as people had a habit of 
saying, not so very many years ago, there was a 
little struggling country town ; one where the 
county fair was the greatest event in the year 



town has never experienced a quiet day since that 
time. They now have a cement plant, which lays 
claim to being the largest in the world; have six 
large smelters, roller mills and acid factory, six 
brickyards and numerous other industries. The 
population is now close to 25,000. The city has 
a water works system with an electric light plant 
in connection ; has an electric railway and at 
present is engaged in paving the streets. There 
are two daily papers and four weekly; all seem 
to be in a flourishing condition, and all these good 
things came to pass because they happened to 
strike gas. 



Texas Fuel Oil Equip- 
ment 



The Texas Fire Prevention Association has 
adopted the following requirements for the in- 
stallation of fuel oil equipments in steam plants: 

Tank for storage of oil supply shall be placed 
underground at least ten feet from foundation 
of building. If tanks are wholly or partly above 



ing, and provided with shut-off cock where sup- 
ply leaves standpipe or accumulator for burners. 



The directors of the Standard Oil Company 
have announced a dividend of 7 per cent, pay- 
able Dec. 15, making, total dividends on Stan- 
dard Oil stock for the current year 36 per cent, 
as compared with 44 per cent last year, 45 per 
cent in 1902, and 48 per cent in the two pre- 
ceding years. At this time last year the divi- 
dend was 12 per cent, and for the September 
quarter this year the rate was 5 per cent. The 
June dividend was 8 per cent, and the dividend 
for the first quarter of 1904, 16 per cent. For 
some time, owing to the relatively large offerings 
of Standard Oil stock, it had been suspected that 
the December dividend was likely to be smaller 
than last year, and it turns out that the market 
accurately forecasted the action of the directors. 
Standard Oil stock has recently sold from 650 
down to 635, on the announcement of the de- 
creased dividend. 



PACIFIC Oil REPOR 



Eastern Exports 

Folli 
thr Eastern ports ol the . r the 



mnnt 






idelphia 

tal . . 






inable to find am 



"1.4- 



ms. I ' 
Delaware 

Philadelphia 1,47s. I ss I 

2,051,211 II 

012 543,392 

N \ i ■ 1 1 r 1 1 is. 

¥ork 523 67,276 

Philadelphia 2,426,912 189,493 

Total 2,950,540 25i 

II I l M1N \TI\C. 

Baltimore 2,445,470 I 

Boston end Charlestown. 4 ! 6,240 

New York 41,617,050 3,521,578 

Philadelphia 20,169,049 1,303,171 



'Sierra" left ■ ha 
arrivals of Australian coal from name- 

Notre Dame D'Arvoi ms; "Mar- 

guerite Dollfus,' 1 2,560 tons; "Ardencraig," 
3,150 tons; "Marechal de Vfllars," 2,950 tons; 

Rene." 2,990 ton.; "Belford," 3.030 tons; '■Wil- 
liam Nottingham," 1,341 tons; "Max," 2,500 
tons; total. 21,61 1 tons, it i s evident the 
lonial coal is being delivered here more generouslj 
than our immediate requirements call i 
ships arriving hire earl) last month haw not mi 
been ordered to a discharging wharf. The load- 
inn list at Newcastle now numbers only thir- 
teen, with a carrying capacitj ol about 32,000 
ions, this is the smallest amount at any time this 
With the eoal freights at present ruling 



larrel oil well h 
Captain W el farm at \ 

miles from ( v mi, ami '1110111 in nil cir- 

des is intense. The , | t!uit 

the territorj was recently tested by the Bucher 

ompany . nd discarded, the lease 
tor a sony to Phillips & Bird of Bradford, Pa., 
who had considerable more faith in it. They 
started the new well a little over 401) feet from 
the Butcher well, which was a two and a half 

barrel in the shale and at 1000 feet were com- 
pelled to withdraw their to ,, s the 
How. Km the first, few hours the well pumped 

seven or eight barrels an hour, finally flowing 
itself and settling to between fortj and fifty bar- 
rels. The town is believed to be on the verge 
of another oil boom such as was witnessed there 
a few years ago when the smaller wells in the 
Chipmunk field were opened. Every acre of land 
about the Welch farm has been leased already 
at a premium. 




Natural and constant flow from California Fortune well No. 4. 



Galveston 3,061 ,849 1 53,092 

Total 67,342,450 5,183,768 

LUBRICATING AND PARAFFIN. 

Baltimore 224,450 34,671 

Boston and Charlestown. 10,032 1,000 

New York 6,223,668 938,108 

Philadelphia 1,699,312 193,968 

Galveston 5,100 714 

Total 8,162,562 1,169,061 

RESIDUUM. 

Boston and Charlestown. 235,998 10,890 

New York 1,995,000 61,750 

Philadelphia 699,174 20,801 

Galveston 814,4111 27,535 

Total 3,744,573 120,976 

TOTAL MINERAL OILS. 

Baltimore 2,669,920 234,358 

Boston and Charlestown. 295,062 18,730 



rates (14.6 to 15 s per ton), there will be very 
few new names to be added to the chartered list 
for sometime, hence our coal orders will be filled 
from our coast collieries. The absence of stormy 
weather so far this season, the demand for do- 
mestic fuel has been exceptionally light. Oil pro- 
ducers are endeavoring combinedly to increase 
the value of their output, and they feel assured 
they will be successful. Any advances in fuel oil 
will prove of advantage to steam coals; the 
market for foreign coals here at present is well 
sustained, but the sales are lighter than usual 
at this season. The best evidence that this port, 

California Fortune Oil Co. Stockholders: 

Please send your addresses to the office 
of the Company. 

CALIFORNIA FORTUNE OIL CO., 
226 Parrott Building, 

San Francisco, Californ ; a. 



A Providence engineer who has made a study 
of oil and coal believes there is little probability 
of striking petroleum east of the Hudson River. 
His reason is that oil and gas and soft coal de- 
posits are found together. Coal is abundant in 
Rhode Island, and probably coal of the same char- 
acter will be found along the Taunton River. 
But Rhode Island coal contains no bitumen, 
which is the basis of mineral oils, and because it 
is lacking in volatile substances it is not easily 
burned — in fact, Rhode Island coal if used like 
Pennsylvania anthracite, simply won't burn. The 
Portsmouth, R .1., coal mine has been e\i 
to a depth of 1,000 feet, and there is no 
warrant the assumption that the coal is an; 
at the bottom than at the top of the bed. 
haps a hole two-thirds deeper will shot 
ent state of affairs, but the engineer • 
ipg tor any such revelations, 
the Winchester Repeating Arms Com 
New Haven, Conn., drilled a wel 
ton, to a depth of 3,500 feer. The limestone 
(prdbablj the Trenton) was never passed 
through. It required three years to drill the well 
owing to the flinty formation. 



PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 



NEWS FROM THE FIELD 

Supplied by Our Regular Correspondents— Recent 
Developments in the Great Oil Fields of the West 



COALINGA 



Maine State No. 8 is in oil at 1600 feet. The 
8-inch pipe has' been carried to that depth. 

The Bishop Fishing Tool Company, of Mc- 
Kittrick, has entered this field, a large stock of 
tools being now ready to place in the warehouse 
which is being built on the north end of the 
Maine State. Ralph Bishop, son of E. R. Bishop, 
the proprietor of the business, will arrive here on 
Sunday to take charge of the business in this 
field. 

On the Gutherie lease, No. 1 is in oil at 1350 
feet. No. 2 is also coming into oil at 1200 feet. 
In the latter well the water has been shut off with 
10-inch pipe. 



Herron company, makes it desirable to have at 
that point a good supply man, and Mr. Fox has 
been chosen to fill the position. He will be suc- 
ceeded here by S. R. Bowen, who is well known 
to many in this field as the manager of the Her- 
ron store in Bakersfield. 

The standard 6-inch pipe to be used in relaying 
the west end pipe line of the Associated Oil Com- 
pany, has not arrived as yet, and work is suspend- 
ed in consequence. 

The California Coast is down about 2500 feet 
on the Escolle tract and has an excellent showing. 

Work is being pushed on the Union Oil Com- 
pany's pipe line to Port Hartford. The work on 
the trenches is nearly completed and the pipe is 
now being scattered along the route. 



quite a number are soon to be started. A fine, 
two-story brick hotel is nearly completed and a 
two-story brick business block is under way. 

"Some idea of the importance of Coalinga 
may be gained from the fact that the town now 
has a population of 700 which does not include 
about 500 more who are employed at the various 
wells in the vicinity. Last election there were 
445 voters registered, which shows that these 
figures are not overdrawn. 

"The new pipe line to Monterey, 110 miles 
distant, has been in use about thirty days and is 
giving good satisfaction. There is no leakage, 
and it is adequate to the demand of the oil fields. 

"There are forty wells in process of drilling 
and of course there is no telling what flow may 
result." 



SANTA MARIA 



Everything points to a very lively year in local 
fields. By the first of January there will be at 
least four new companies operating in this dis- 




One of the wells of the Midway Oil Co., Midway District. 



The Standard Oil Company has lately shipped 
1,400,000 gallons of California refined oil to the 
Orient. 

Nos. 1 and 2 on the Corey & Canfield lease 
are now in good shape. No. 3 is 300 feet deep. 

Thomas Menzies has the contract for the erec- 
tion of two 1200 barrel tanks on the property of 
Forty Oil Company, and two of the same size 
on the Pittsburg-Coalinga. 

A face familiar to all Coalinga oil men will 
be missed in a few days, when E. J. Fox, man- 
ager of the local branch of the H. R. Herron 
Company, who has been connected with the 
Coalinga store since it was started, leaves to take 
charge of the Santa Maria branch of the Herron 
business. The development of the newer field, 
bringing a large volume of supply business to the 



The hearing of the action brought by the 
Merced Oil Company against Patterson, Roberts 
and others has been set for November 29. 

Westmoreland No. 2 was packed on Tuesday 
and immediately began flowing at the rate of 250 
barrels a day. The well is very gassy. Super- 
intendent Kerr states the oil is 27yi gravity. 

The Pittsburg-Coalinga well is in the oil sand. 

A rig is being built on W. P. Kerr's 20 acres 
on section 24. — Record. 

W. H. Kerr, justice of the peace at Coalinga, 
is in San Francisco as a witness in an oil case. 

"The town of Coalinga," said he, "has grown 
so in the past six months that if a person has not 
seen it in that time, he would not know it. 

"Residences are going up all over the place and 



trict, the Todos Santos, the Barca, the Pennsyl- 
vania Petroleum and the Coblentz oil companies. 
The first to start operations is the Pennsylvania 
Petroleum. They are now rigging up and will 
start drilling Monday. 

The Hall & Hall well adjoining the Kaiser is, 
down 1760 feet and are expecting daily to go into 
the grease. 

The Pinal Company is very busy these days 
pumping five wells and drilling on four. This 
company is shipping about 1000 barrels of oil 
daily. 

The Western Union finished up a well ad- 
joining the Graciosa property during the past 
week and is now tubing it, preparing to put it on 



PACIFIC OIL RKPOK 



the pump. This well is good I arrcls 

daily at Ic 

The Recruit is drilling on the prop- 

erty ir lent show • 

well near 
Casmalia is down about ISlMI ii-ct with 8-inch 
pipe. 

The I people arc drilling on theit 

1 and 4 and lumber is now on tin- pound tor 
ind 3 are still Rowing at a rate 
daily, 
utt, the new oil town which lias sprung up 
in the local field, seems to be prospering beyond 
expectations. It is now supporting a machine 
shop, an oil well store, livery stable and a build- 
ing to be occupied as a general merchandise More 
is now under way. 

Mr. Wallace, a member of a firm of tank 
biulders of Coalinga, was here during the week 
and made preparations to locate a branch at Or- 
cutt. 

The Radium Oil Company succeeded in pass- 
ing through the wash with their 12' .. casing. 
landing at 657 feet. Are now in shale at 850 
feet and getting along nicely. This well, having 



jied the sb. 
will Iv 

shire territory, as ha. I a fail suited 

have materially curtailed t! 
>bire*s holdings, hut which is now proven h 
a doubt to be good. 

The Barca Oil Compan) commeno 

five operations on its prop,:; near Harris Sta- 
tion. A road is being built and live carloads of 
timber are at the station, which will be hauled in 
n as the road is completed, not later than 
Monday. The Barca Company is meeting with 
flattering success in the sale of its stock, particu- 
larly among oil men, whose judgment is naturally 
supposed to be wise in matters pertain. 
oil territon . 

This week in the Superior Court is being heard 
the c.isr of the Orenas against the Newloves, and 
many witnesses from this vicinity have been sum- 
moned to offer such testimony as their knowledge 
of the facts in the case warrants. From the 
Santa Barbara Independent the following ac- 
count of what constitutes the basis of the suit 
is taken : 



Strip ot land situ 
puted holdings of the < 

onti wxA by the 

deed executed b] a, which 

from one party to .mother until i: 
into pi \ 

conve] 

acres, which lie defendants now claim. 

"The greater portion ol of land to 

which title is disputed adjoins oJ the 

Pinal ( )il Company, which are rated as among 

the most productive in the field, and the wells 

of the. Western I nion Company, the pioneers in 

that section of the county, are onh a short dis- 
tance away. The Newlove property, with the 
disputed section included, is valued by the own- 
ers at more than a million dollars, and in view 
fact that the disputed strip constitutes one 
of the most promising portions of the ranch for 
oil development purposes, it is easily to be seen 
that the case now pending will be fought to the 
limit before final settlement can be had." 

Council and Council, the contractors who for 
the past eighteen months have b^cn drilling the 



EXPORTS OF DOMESTIC MINERAL OIL FROM THE PACIFIC PORTS OF THE UNITED STATES, AND SHIPMENTS TO HAWAII AND ALASKA DURING 

OCTOBER, 1904. 



Districts. 
Domestic Exports. 

Alaska 

Puget Sound 

San Diego 

San Francisco 

Total domestic 

Shipments to Hawaii — 

From Los Angeles 

From San Francisco . . . 

Shipments to Alaska 

From Puget Sound 

From San Francisco . . . 



Mineral. Crude. 
Gallons.! Dollars. 



120.200 

420.2001 



14,013 
14,013 



1,352,400| 

1,911,000| 

I 

30| 

I 



43,680 
63.700 



Xapthas, Etc. 

Gallons. | Dollars. 

10| 4 

200| 10 

1,980| ISM 

23.689J 2,940 

25,879 3,154 



I 

I 

21,515| 

I 
11,665| 

I 



2,493 
2,730 



Illuminating. 

Gallons.| Dollars, 

2,290 563 

4,638| 915 

410| 75 

23,798 4,157 

31.136J 5,710 



Lubricating. 

Gallons. | Dollars. 

120| 100 

1. ."■<>- 470 

50| 22 

34.016J 6,772 

25,688 7,364 



1 



27,0221 
2.133] 



2,110 



5.S02 
310 



10,977| 

I 
2.733J 
1,300| 



2,878 



1,238 

819 



Residuum. 
Barrels.| Dollars. 



3431 



Reported expressly for the Pacific Oil Reporter by Department of Commerce and Labor. Bureau of Statistics. 



November 4, 1904. 



P. AUSTIN, 
Chief of Bureau. 



100 PER CENT ADVANCE 



An advance of not less than 100 per cent will be made on Duchess 
stock within a few days. The allotment of 100,000 shares was oversub- 
scribed. The second allotment of 50,000 shares is almost gone. 

The stock of the American Duchess Oil Company will advance to 
TEN CENTS PER SHARE on DECEMBER 5th, 1904. The first 
allottment of 100,000 shares was over-subscribed and only a small amount 
of stock is left of the second allottment at five cents per share. In order to 
secure some of this stock at this low price, it is advisable to wire at once, 
as all orders by wire will take preference over mail matter. 

Investors who reserved blocks of stock by wire and then investigated, 
in every instance took the stock. Orders as high as 10,000 shares have 
been filled by wire. Shrewd investors realize that Duchess stock at five 
cents per share is the best investment to be had in any company at any price. 
A full description ad may be found in this paper on page 15, issue 
of November 5th. 

The land of the Duchess Company is proven. The management is 
of the best and has been endorsed by a great number of the best oil and 
mining papers. A good paying well was found in the first sand, 
at the depth of 800 feet. The oil was temporarily cut off. They are now 
drilling for the second sand. The well is over 1,200 feet deep in sandy 
shale carrying much oil and tremendous gas pressure. The second sand 
will mean a big production of 55 gravity oil that sells at $3 
per barrel. When the well is finished we look for the stock to go to $1 
or more per share. The Duchess will be our next dividend-payer. Let 
us tell you about it. Write or wire for particulars. You had better wire 
and have a block of stock reserved. 



GOLDFIELD, NEVADA, 

THE GREATEST GOLDFIELD DISCOVERED 

IN RECENT YEARS. 

We are receiving many inquiries and subscriptions from those who 
desire to aid in promoting the company mentioned below. Our general 
manager leaves for Goldfield this week to start work upon the property. 
If you help promote this company, you will get a large block of stock at 
bottom prices and a square deal. 

We are organizing a company to develop a first-class property at Gold- 
field, Nevada. We will soon have 100 subscriptions of $100 each. Ten 
thousand dollars pays for the property with no indebtedness against the 
company and sufficient cash to start work. Half of the shares to be placed 
in the treasury. The other half will be divided among the promoters in 
even proportion to the amount of money invested. Parties putting in more 
than $100 will receive their pro rata of the shares. We will sell the 
treasury shares to carry on rapid development. Here is a chance to get in 
at bottom prices. We subscribed $1000 and our friends w 7 ithin a few ' 
subscribed $3000. We will have the full $10,000 within a few days. 

Join this promotion and get shares at the organization price. Co. 
will be handled by competent business men of San Francisco. 

LOOK INTO THIS BEFORE YOU BUY ANY GOLDFIELD 
STOCKS. 

DEBENTURE SURETY COMPANY <*> 

Rialto Building, San Francisco, Cal. 
Use the Wires. It Pays. 



PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 



oil well for the Mulholand Company on the B. 
Pezzoni ranch, have finished pulling the casing, 
and left Monday for a tour of the oil fields of this 
part of the country. They will spend the re- 
mainder of the week in this vicinity, when they 
will return to Los Angeles. It is reported that 
a new well may be begun near the old one soon. 
— Guadalupe Moon. 



KERN 



Dr. Liscom, secretary of the Independent Oil 
Producers' Association states that the arrange- 
ment for the offices of the association has not yet 
been completed and that it might be several days 
before they are opened. 

He said that everything in connection with 
the association is progressing favorably and that 
it is receiving the heartiest support from all quar- 
ters. 

The Petroleum Center, operating on section 
2-11-24, at Sunset, has brought in an excellent 
well at a depth of 1260 feet, and the significance 
of the strike is that it is further out on the plains 
than any other well in the district, the Pittsburg 
alone excepted. The drill struck the oil sand at 
1205 feet, and uncovered a stratum of 28 feet 
of very rich sand. The drill has now been sunk 
to 12b0 feet and the casing will be landed. 

The well is on the southeast quarter of the 
northeast quarter of the"section, and the Pe- 
troleum Centre is operating under a lease from 
McCutchen Bros. & Baden. Under the terms of 
the lease the company j must sink ten wells, and 
last week three carloads of material were shipped 
to the field. Another well will be begun at 
once. I 

The Standard Oil Company, which before the 
independent producers began to curtail their pro- 
duction was just about able to build reservoirs 
fast enough to keep pace with the accumulation 
of surplus oil, is now getting ahead with its stor- 
age capacity to the extent of about 2,500,000 bar- 
rels. 

The roofs have just been finished on two of the 
new reservoirs, and the scraping is about com- 
pleted on three others. These reservoirs hold 
about half a million barrels each. 

The company has seventeen more reservoirs 
staked out and it is evident that work of con- 
struction is not to cease for some time yet. 

A man who is well acquainted with the condi- 
tions in the field says that he did not expect that 
the Standard would be very anxious to buy oil 
during the winter on account of the difficulty of 
handling the stuff in cold weather. Even pump- 
ing the oil from the wells to the reservoir is a 
difficult task in cold weather, and it often re- 
quires as high as 600 pounds pressure to force it 
through the pipes. This high pressure results in 
the frequent breaking of the fittings. The greater 
ease of pumping the warmer oil is shown by the 
fact that in the summer time a pressure of 150 
pounds is sufficient to accomplish the same result. 

A press dispatch from San Bernardino says: 

The Santa Fe Company is going into the oil 
business on a wider scale than ever, according to 
Fred T. Pern's, superintendent of the company's 
oil properties and industry. The Santa Fe was 
the first railroad to adopt the fluid for fuel and 
the savings have been enormous, as practically 
every engine west of Albuquerque have been 
equipped with oil burners and the company has 
been gradually extending the use of the oil to the 
Eastern divisions. 

Within the past few days new wells have been 
added in both the Santa Fe, Bakersfield and Olin- 
da fields. The company is constantly on the 
lookout for new oil locations and Superintendent 



Flow of Natural Gas 
Increased by . . . 

Cooper's Gas Lift 

Also flow of water 
or oil Increased and 
gas saved 

A. S. COOPER, C.E., 

219 Crocker Building 
San Francisco, Cal. 



AT A BARGAIN. 
Standard Drilling Rig with full equipment of 
small tools. Boiler and engine in first-class con- 
dition. Address Exchange No. 21, care this 
journal. 



WE SELL 



BARLOW & HILL 

MAPS 



UP-TO- 
DATE . . 



WHICH ARE THE ONLY 



RELIABLE MAP PUBLISHED 



Large Blue Prints, $1.50 

Book containing Small Indexed Maps 

ol all the California Fields, each 50 



Per Dozen. 



5.00 



WANTED — Position as Superintendent of an 
oil company. Thirty years' experience in 
Pennsylvania, Ohio and California. Best of 
reference. Address, 

"PETROLEUM," care this paper. 



We Promote, Finance and Incorporate 

Let us show you the advantages of incorporating your business or enterprise. 
If you need money to enlarge your business, permit us to secure it for you, by selling 
stock through our Eastern correspondents: 

CONSOLIDATED AUDITING COMPANY 

307 to 310 Mills Building, San Francisco. 
Telephone Bush 849. 

WRITE US TO-DAY ! 
If you want to invest your money in a sound business proposition where you are sure 
to receive ten dollars for every one dollar invested 

BUY BUFFALO-CALIFORNIA OIL STOCK. 
This company is incorporated under a special act of Congress providing for the incor- 
poration of companies in the District of Columbia, making our stock absolutely non-assessable 
We hold some of the most valuable oil property in the well known 

HALFMOON BAY DISTRICT, 
San Mateo County, California, 
Now possessing many fine oil wells producing 52° to 55° gravity oil. But we cannot tell it all 
here. Write us for full particulars. 

Correspondence with reliable brokers and agents solicited. 

BUFFALO-CALIFORNIA OIL CO., 

Fletcher Block, 

Livermore, California. 



C. V. Hall Iron Works 

(LOCATION, OLINDA, ORANGE CO., CAL.) 

POSTOFFICE ADDRESS, Route No. 2, 
FULLERTON; CAL. 

Los Angeles Office, 222 Wilcox Building, 
LOS r'NGELES, CAL. 

The C. V. H. Chain Tongs can be had through 
any dealer in oil well supplies. 

These tongs are made of the very best steel, 
in any size, and always give satisfaction. 

Manufacturers or users of chain tongs do so 
at their own risk, in any infringements of 
Patent No. 438,177, the ownership of 
which belongs to the undersigned. 

CHARLES VICTOR HALL. 




PACIFIC OIL REPOR 



me thirtx producing 
nil companii I in llir new nl' ; 

thr Pn ' luipemlcnt 

morning when Chairman \l I 

callol thr order anil bet. ire the noon 

1 per month hail been 

pledged to the independent agency. U> Friday, 

there is a guarantee that the production at the 

the new combine will be 45 
barrels or 15,000 barrels a day. 

v time was wasted in preliminaries this morn- 
ing. I he representatives "t the compart) were 
•led for business, and Secretary Liscomb 
was directed to call the roll with a view to ascer- 
taining the progress that had been made by each 
company in securing the ratification of the agree- 
ment, the text of which was given in the Cnli- 
fornian on Tuesday. 

A~ the several companies were called, the rep- 
resentatives made report of the condition existing. 
A number stated that the agreement had already 
been signed, and others explained, that by reason 
of absent directors or from some other un- 
avoidable cause, the preliminaries had not yet 
been completed, though these would be put for- 
malities. When the roll call had been concluded 
it developed that nineteen companies had either 
the agreemnt or had authorized the sign- 
ing thereof, and that these companies represent, 
as stated, 330,000 barrels monthly production. 
Other companies that are known to be friendly 
to the movement are at work securing the con- 
sent of the stockholders, and it is not premature 
to say that in a few days the agency will control 
00 barrels monthly. The companies that 
have already pledged their production follow. 
The amounts are in most cases a net figure, and 
are conservative in each instance: 

Barrels. 

Amazon, by T. Early 23,000 

Lackawanna, by E. E. Jones 10,000 

Revenue, by J. F. Kerr 15.0C0 

Nob Hill, by W. A. Fergusson 40,000 

Adeline, by W. H. Hill 8,000 

Enterprise, by J. F. Lucy 7,500 

Vesta, by A. H. Liscomb 30,000 

Euclid, by M. V. McQuigg 8,000 

Potomac, by W. S. Morton 25,000 

Nevada County, by W. B. Robb 30.0CO 

Illinois Crude, by T Spellacy 20,000 

East Puente, by F. N. Scofield 18,000 

Eastern Consolidated, by T. O. Turner 20,000 

Coloma, by L. P. St. Clair 18,000 

Globe, by A. J. Wallace 15,000 

Maricopa, by F. F. Weed 6,000 

Kern Sunset, by G. J. Planz 5,000 

McKittrick, by S. P. Wible 10,000 

Mecca, by C. C. Boles 15,000 

Total 329,500 

The representatives of the companies in the 
agency met again at 2 o'clock and went into 
executive session to consider the questions in- 



FOR. SALE. 

nal < >il s t . I per share. 

| per 
share. 

W. I RD, 

I'enth Street, fomja. 



We manufacture the best 
lubricating oils for oil 
drillers 

KING KEYSTONE OIL CO., 
204 Front St., San Francisco. 



BARGAIN 

Complete Oil Rig for Sale 

Including two String Toole 
and Fishing Toole 

Over 8000 feet ot caning In good condi- 
tion — Home never used — size*, IIS, 
9 Hi 3 inch and inch drive pipe 

The Above Property 
Cost Over $10,000 

and is (or sale at a bargain 

Exchange No. 22 

Care this Publication 



HE 

KROHN 
WIRE ROPE SOCKET 

THE ONLY SOCKET USING A BALL CLUTCH 



LASTING QUALITIES UNEQUALLED 



PATENT 



CLUTCH 




DEVICE 



Fop Sale by ALL 

OIL WELL SUPPLY HOUSES 



LLEWELLYN IRON WORKS 

SOLE MANUFACTURERS 

LOS ANGELES, CAL. 

Write for Circular 




O I L 

WELL 

SUPPLIES 
EXCLUSIVELY 



All Fully Equipped 

** THE LARGEST STOCK * 

ON THE 

PACIFIC COAST 



We Have 



R. H. HERRON CO. Ian 8 fRMciscofck. 




STORES 



H 



PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 



CALIFORNIA STOCK AND OIL EX- 
CHANGE. 



.40 



.15 
.16 

.17 



The following were stock sales in the Califor- 
nia Stock and Oil Exchange in the formal sessions 
held for the week ending Wednesday, November 
30: 
Associated Stock — 

4,280 shares at 24 

" 1,168 shares at 25 

Apollo — 

300 shares at . . . 
California-Standard — 

2,800 shares at . . 16 

Home — 

. 1,500 shares at 50 

100 shares at 52 

200 shares at 53 

Independence — 

1,000 shares at 33 

2,000 shares at -34 

Junction — 

1,500 shares at . . . 
100 shares at . . . 
245 shares at . . . 
Kern River — 

150 shares at 12.00 

Monte Cristo — 

1,000 shares at 77' 

Occidental — 

2,800 shares at 05 

Oil City Petroleum — 

1,150 at 

200 shares at . . . 

Soverign — 

15 shares at • • • -31 

Twentv-Eight — 

200 shares at 12.00 

Union — 

5 shares at 58.00 

United Petroleum — 

33 shares at 100.00 

Following are the latest quotations for stocks 
of oil companies listed on the California Stock 
and Oil Exchange: 

Bid. 

Alma 50 

Apollo 

Ass. Oil Co. Stk. Tr. Cer 
Astec 



.60 

.65 



.24 

.60 

.16 

.60 

.70 

.22 

: 77y 5 

.35 " 

.41 

.54 

.23 



Asked. 

"!43 
.25 



California-Standard . . 

Caribou 

Central Point Con. . . . 

Chicago Crude 

Claremont 

Coalinga and Pacific . . 

Forty 

Four 

Giant 

Hanford 185.00 

Home 50 

Homestake 

Illinois Crude 

Imperial 13.00 

Independence 34 

Tunction 18 

Kern 4.75 

Kern (New) 

Kern River 

Maricopa 

McKittrick 10 

Monte Cristo 

Occidental of W. Va. .. .05 
Oil City Petroleum ... .64 

Peerless 10.00 

Petroleum Center 03 

Pittsburg 

Reed Crude 2.00 

S. F. & McKittrick 

Senator 70 

Soverign .31 

Sterling 2.00 

Superior 

Teck 

Thirty-Three 6.00 

Toltec ... . : 22 

Twenty-Eight 12.00 

Union 59.00 

United Petroleum 100.00 

Wolverine 40 



.17 



.B2y 2 



6.50 

.70 

16.50 

.35 







30 


12 


00 




.10 


.80 




13 


50 




.08 


2 


.10 


3 


.00 



.34 
2.40 

.09 
1.15 
8.00 

15*66 



H 



PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 

is the only 

OIL JOURNAL 

Published on the 

Pacific Coast. 

It gives full, fresh and authentic oil news from 
all the oil districts, new and old. It exposes 
fraudulent oil companies. It gives the latest 
information on oil stocks and dividends. It 
describes the latest method of drilling wells, 
pumping, piping and storing oil; use of oil for 
road making, etc. 

It is the only paper which advocates the belief 
that California's refined asphalt is the equal 
of Trinidad asphalt for paving and other pur- 
poses, and is in every way superior to bitumi- 
nous rock, the use of which has given San 
Francisco, Oakland and other California cities 
so many poor streets. 

The subscription price is $2.50 a year. If you 
are interested in any way in California oil, cut 
out the following coupon, fill in the blank lines, 
and send it, accompanied by check, money 
or express order to the 

PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 

318 Pine St. San Francisco 



Subscription Blank 



[i year j2.jp 
6 Months 1.50 
3 Months 1.00 



Pacific Oil Reporter 

318 Pine Street San Francisco. 



Please enter my subscription to the PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 



tor- 



Signed 



Address- 



Date- 



PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 



Vol. 6. No. 6 



San Francisco, Cal., Saturday, Dec. lO, 1904 



Price Ten Cents 



PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 

Published Weekly. 

The Oil Authority of the Pacific Coast. 

Endorsed by California Petroleum Miners' Asj'n. 

MARIA R. WINN, Proprietor. 
I. S. EASTMAN, Editor and Manager. 



OFFICE AND EDITORIAL ROOMS 

318 Pine Street - - San Francisco, California 
Telephone, Bush 176. 



TERMS. 

One Tear 12 60 

Six: Month! 1 BO 

Three Months 1 00 

Single Copies 10c 

STRICTLY IN ADVANCE. 

Money should be sent by Postal Order. Draft or 
Registered Letter, addressed to Pacific Oil Reporter, 
118 Pine Street. San Francisco, rooms 31-32-83. Com- 
munications must be accompanied by writer's name 
and address, net necessarily for publication, but as 
a guarantee of good faith. 

Entered In the Postofflce at San Francisco. Cali- 
fornia, as second class matter. 

Latest Quotations 



Following are the latest quotations for Cali- 
fornia crude oil at the wells: 

COALINGA. 

Prices 
Gravity at 60° temperature. per barrel. 

Oil of 22° up to but not including 24° . . . .20 

Oil of 24° up to but not including 25° . . . .30 

Oil of 25° up to but not including 26° . . . .35 

Oil of 26° up to but not including 27° . . . .40 

Oil of 27° up to but not including 28° . . . .45 

Oil of 28° up to but not including 29° . . . .50 

Oil of 29° up to but not including 30° . . . .55 

Fuel oil, 14 degrees gravity or better 15 

KERN. 

Fuel oil, 14 degrees gravity or better 15 

KANSAS-INDIAN TERRITORY. 

Oil of 32 degrees gravity $0.87 

Oil of 31 y 2 degrees gravity 82 

Oil of 31 degrees gravity 77 

Oil of 30J/2 degrees gravity 72 

Oil of 30 degrees gravity 67 

Oil of 29j< degrees gravity 62 

Oil of 29 degrees gravity 57 

Oil of 28 '.-j degrees gravity 52 

Oil of 28 degrees gravity 47 

EASTERN QUOTATIONS. 

Pennsylvania 1.56 

Tiona 1.71 

Corning 1 .33 

New Castle 1.43 

North Lima 1-05 

South Lima 1-00 

Indiana 1-00 

Corsicana, light 85 

Corsicana, heavy 50 

Somerset 1-01 

Ragland 60 

Petrolea (Ont.) : 1.53 

tej£as. 

Beaumont 35 

Sour Lake 35 

Saratoga 35 

Batson . . . : 33 



l \ M \RI \. 

Pri( i 
Temperature. t H 

25 up to hut not includin 

p to but not includin ... .55 

p t.i but not includin 

p to but not includin 

p to but not includin 70 

p to but not including 31 75 

31 up to but not includin- 32° 80 

32 and up 85 

RETAIL. 

Kerosene. Pearl, per gal., iq'^c; Astral, 
: Star, igi c; Extra Star, jjc: F.occne, 
Blaine, 26c; Water White, in bulk, 13c; 
do ISO ileu'., 13c: do. extra fine. 15c; Mineral 
Seal, iron bbls., 1 8c ; wooden bbls., 20 1 jc ; do, 
cs., 24c; Deodorized Stove Gasoline, in bulk, 
do, in cs., 22%c; 86 deg. Gasoline, in bulk, 
25c; cs., 31c; 83 deg. Naphtha or Benzine, de- 
odorized, in bulk, per gal., 13c; do, in cs., 10' oc. 



1 lie past week has been a very active one on 
the California Stock and Oil Exchange. The 
total number of shares changing hands for the 
seven days ending December 7 was more than 
fifty thousand, a record unprecedented by any 
week for more than a year. The general mar 
ket in oil stocks is firm excepting, perhaps, the 
ill-fated Home stock, which is still fluctuating 
around 50 cents, with a tendency to be on the 
decline. ' Eighteen thousand shares of Associated 
stock changed hands at 24 cents, which is 5 cents 
higher than it has brought until very recently. 
The general outlook is exceptionally good, with 
a prospect of higher prices for crude oil, which 
in turn will materially strengthen the stock of 
every producing company. Union jumped from 
$61 to $71 during the week, on account of the 
bringing in of a gusher by that company in the 
Santa Maria field, which practically doubles the 
production of the company. 



The "Common Carrier" problem as applied to 
pipe lines seems to be the chief topic of discussion 
in the Kansas oil field. Journalism in the "Sun- 
flower State" seems to be particularly succeptible 
to sensational theories with very little common 
sense interwoven therein and we fear that many of 
its scare stories are simply the echo of its own 
knocking. Now after agitating a proposition to 
prevent pumping gas out of the State, in which 
the name of the legislature was freely used, the 
"common carrier" problem is taking precedence 
and it is said that a bill will shortly he introduced 
in that State to make all pipe-lines operating there- 
in common carriers. The press of our own State 
is commencing to see no reason why this should 
not be constitutional, and declares that the Coa- 
I intra Oil and Transportation Co.'s line between 
Coalinga and Monterey is a common carrier. 
Now as a matter of fact it would be unconsti- 
tutional for any legislature to pass a law mak- 
ing existing pipe-lines common carriers. A law 
could be passed making pipe-lines common car- 
riers that were constructed after the passu 
the law, but it would not effect any pine-line that 
had been constructed or for which a charter 
had been obtained before the passage of the 



Anj company maj acl as such if it wishi 

This 

j Ivania, and there is a lav in that 

pipelines common carriers. It 
did not. howevi 

is to the passage of tl. 



ly upon ti the West 

em Union gusher in I Vlaria field comes 

the report of another gusher near by. the equal 
of which California has never before po 
It has astrong flavor of : ; 

mont, and the little tin. n 1 is 

taking on an air of activity never seen \nitsiile of 
a booming oil field. That the bringing in of 
this well will cause a general influx of capital 
to the Santa Maria field is more than likely, anil 
from the present .outlook our former prediction 
that this would eventually become the banner 
field of the State seems more than likely to be 
fulfilled. As usual the Chronicle has put in its 
knock. It says: "Santa "Maria has had other 
gushers * * * which have subsided after 
making a phenomenal display * * resolv- 

ing themselves into quite ordinary wells. * * * 
Gushing under such circumstances is not regard- 
ed with much favor by oil experts, as, in the 
case of the Spindletop gushers, they show signs 
of exhaustion and finally run dry." 

A person at all familiar with the Santa Ma- 
ria field knows these assertions untrue, and so 
far as a comparison with the Beaumont field is 
concerned there is none. Nearly a year ago the 
Graciosa company finished up a well in the Santa 
Maria field just at the top of the sand. It start- 
ed off at 400 barrels daily and from that day to 
this there has been no signs of any dimunition in 
the flow. Two years ago the Pinal company 
brought in a 400-barrel well that has not only 
kept up, but increased in production. In fact 
there is not a well in the Santa Maria field 
that shows any falling off, although some of 
them have been flowing from one to two years. 
As a matter of fact all experts are unanimous in 
their opinion that it will take a great many years 
to exhaust the Santa Maria field. Over 1000 
feet of oil-bearing strata is found hero which, in 
itself, is sufficient evidence of the stability of the 
field. At Spindle Top a bare hundred feet of 
oil sand was found, and the territory within 
which oil was developed was so small that, to- 
gether with the fact that wells were drill 
close together that one could walk practically all 
over the field from derrick to derrick, a 

exhaustion of the field was inevitable. A tl 

sand feet of oil sand is not going to run 01 
quickly. Already more than forty square mile? 
of territory has been absolutely proven, and 11 1 
man yet knows the limits of the field, for 1 
well has been sunk outside productive 
Wells are being sunk far apart, 
est rare is being taken to shut ol 
which, however, there is little to 
the first 500 feet. We predict' that when the 
limits of the Santa Maria field h lefinec! 

even the famous Baku fields will fade Into in- 
sienifii 



PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 



Natural Gas in California 

OP EH, M. E. ;& j& 



j& j& By Ji. S. CO 



x. 

DURABILITY OF SUPPLY AND QUANTITY OF 
NATURAL GAS. 

All hydrocarbons are volatile, whether it be 
coal, asphaltum or petroleum oil. Nature not 
only makes gas from coal, but in making gas 
makes coke. Anthracite is natural coke; it is coal 
which has been exposed to a hgh temperature and 
has undergone the same changes which are pro- 
duced in coal by artificial heat. Graphite is the 
residue of coal after all the volatile parts of the 
coal have been driven off in the shape of gas by 
heat. Many millions of tons of impure graphite 
are to be found between Russian and Eel rivers 
and the Pacific ocean in the counties of Mendo- 
cino and Sonoma, California. Asphaltum and pe- 
troleum oil are entirely converted to gas by heat, 
and petroleum oil yields gas by decomposition. 
That petroleum oil and asphaltum exist in im- 
mense quantities in porous and seamed strata 
where metamorphic action is taking place is well 
known. In California the material from which 
gas is generated is inexhaustible and the produc- 
tion of gas at the present day is very great. 

Many billions of tons of bituminized shales and 
sandstones are to be seen on the surface of the 
earth in California, and many billions of the sed- 
imentary and bituminized rock must lie buried 
beneath the surface, as all underlying rocks are 
bituminized to a greater or less extent when the 
surface rocks are impregnated. This is proven 
by the records of drilled wells. The bitumen in 
these rocks are undergoing decomposition and 
natural gas is being found sufficient to supply 
California with a large volume of gas for many 
hundreds of years. On or near the surface the 
volatile parts of the bitumen have evaporated, 
leaving a brown, Arable asphalt. At greater 
depths the bitumen exists as liquid asphaltum, and 
at still greater depths as petroleum oil. 

That carbureted hydrogen rose to the surface of 
the earth when fissures were first formed, which 
extended to metamorphic rock, in greater quan- 
tity than at the present time is probable. -That 
these fissures were made millions of years ago can- 
not be questioned. 

As long as abnormal conditions of temperature 
can be detected beneath the Coast Ranges and the 
Great Valley the production of natural gas is 
still in progress. 

Since the discovery and knowledge of places 
where natural gas exhales and mineral springs 
flow, yielding carbureted hydrogen, in Califor- 
nia by civilized man there has been no diminution 
of the flow of these springs or exhalations. At 
Stockton gas wells have been flowing for over 
twenty-five years, and where the wells have been 
kept in order the flow of natural gas and water 
is the same now as when the wells were' first 
drilled. 

Numerous places from which natural gas es- 
capes on the east side of the Hudson river have 
been known since 1830. The flow is the same 
now as when first discovered. There are many 
other places in the United States where gas is 
being evolved from the earth. 

Professor Orton says: "A striking peculiarity 
of the Meade county, Kentucky, gas field is the 
maintenance of the combined flow of the gas and 
water from the same wells for so long periods. 
Of this joint produce of the rock the Moreman 
well furnishes the best example. For twenty-five 



years it produced salt water and gas without 
any great abatement of the flow of either and 
without any manifest change in the proportions 
of these substances. In almost every other field 
where salt water once finds access to the well it 
gains rapidly at the expense of the gas, bringing 
about the complete extinction of the latter after 
a brief period." 

For more than sixty years the gas which is- ' 
sues from the gas wells of the Kanawha Valley, 
West Virginia, has been employed as a fuel in the 
evaporation of the brine. 

A well yielding water with gas in solution 
shows that the hydrostatic pressure is sufficient to 
bring the water with the gas in solution to the 
surface. Where this hydrostatic pressure is very 
great, as in the Moreman well, the well will 
yield a-much larger volume of gas and a smaller 
volume of water than where the pressure is less. 
The well will last for a long time without change 
of either volume of gas or water, far longer than 
a well that draws its supply of gas from accu- 
mulations of free gas and where the hydrostatic 
pressure is not sufficient to cause the well to flow 
water. For this reason in the first case the well 
draws its supply from an ocean of water with 
gas in solution, and in the second case the well 
draws its principal supply from a cup full of gas 
when compared with gas held in solution with 
the ocean of water, and gets but little gas from 
the ocean of water. This action of gas wells 
will be discussed in future papers. 

As the chronology of natural gas in America 
is very short a description of natural gas in the 
Old World, given below, will give some idea of 
its durability. 

The Dead Sea, a lake in Syria, is forty- 
six miles in length and varies from five to 
nine miles in width. Its surface has a depres- 
sion of 1312 feet below the level of the ocean. 
Its greatest depth is 1300 feet. The water is 
intensely salt and bitter. 

The valley through which the River Jordan 
flows and the Dead Sea lies is 300 miles long, 
140 of which are below the level of the sea. The 
valley forms a deep and wide trench, bearing 
north and south in the mountain chain, so that ■ 
one standing on the western s'ide of the valley the 
eastern side of the Jordan seems flanked by a 
continuous range of mountains, which is really 
only the edge of the cleft, the elevated plateau 
continuing eastward until it sinks into the Syrian 
desert. 

M. Lartet accounts for the formation in this 
way: 'At some remote period a fracture took 
place in the strata of this region, extending north 
and south. In consequence of the unequal 
strength of the strata the western side of the 
fracture sank, occasioning the abrupt dip observ- 
able in the strata on the western side of the 
valley, and the great depression of the valley 
itself, while the eastern side of the fracture re- 
mained intact, showing at various places along 
the eastern shore of the Dead Sea a vertical sec- 
tion, through the limestone and sandstone. 

'Many traces of volcanic (pseudo-volcanic) 
action, both remote and recent, have been ob- 
served in the basin of the Dead Sea, such as trap 
dykes and hot sulphur and brackish springs." 

Probably Sodom and Gomorrah were destroyed 
by a violent pseudo-volcanic action nearly four 
thousand years ago. These conditions must have 



existed for many thousands of years before the 
destruction of Sodom and Gomorrah. 

"Near the northern end of the lake a copious 
stream of warm sulphurous water flows into the 
lake between stupendous cliffs of sandstone. Sul- 
phur springs stud the shores and sulphur is 
strewn in layers and fragments over the desolate 
plains. 

"It is reported that muffled sounds proceed 
from this lake, and that sometimes sulphurous 
exhalations issue from the water and that birds 
attempting to fly across it are struck dead by its 
pestiferous fumes." 

Bitumen oozing through the fissures of the 
rocks is deposited with gravel on the beach, or 
appears with sulphur and seems to have been de- 
posited at the same time. The sea is often vis- 
ited by frequent and violent earthquakes. Dur- 
ing the earthquakes asphaltum is ejected from the 
fissures in the bottom of the lake and are driven 
to the shore. 

Judging by analogous geological phenomena in 
California, the Dead Sea occupies a fissured fault 
or subsidence. The fissures acting as conduits 
to convey bitumen, mineral water and bituminous 
and sulphurous vapors to the surface, which have 
been formed by heat in metamorphic (pseudo-vol- 
canic) rocks below. 

Bischof says : "On the western shores of the 
Caspian, in the country around Baku, upon the 
peninsula of Abscheron, a tract of land has been 
long known under the name of the Field of Fire, 
which continually emits inflammable gas. Upon 
the Schagdag, not far from the village of Kina- 
lughi, 7834 feet above the Caspian sea, are found 
considerable exhalations of carburetted hydrogen 
gas (the Eternal Fire of the Schlagdag), which 
streams directly out of clefts in sandstones alter- 
nating with shales. This burning gas is never 
extinguished by meteorological influences." 

Dr. George Harturg says : 

"Near Pietia Mala, between Bologne and 
Florence, on a spot about twelve feet in diame- 
ter, several flames rise from the earth, the largest 
of which ascends to a height of five feet, and is 
seen burning at night with a pale yellow flame, 
while its minor satellites around are blue tipped 
with white. No doubt many a terrible legend is 
attached to this infernal spectacle. Near Ba- 
rigazzo, between Modena and Pistoja, near the 
ruins of Bellegi, and in many other parts of the 
volcanic regions of the Apennines, similar flames 
gush out of the ground. The neat little town of 
Fredonia, in the State of New York, on the east- 
ern shore of Lake Erie, is lighted by natural 
springs of carbureted hydrogen, which, being led 
into a gasometer, feed the seventy or eighty lamps 
of the town. The thrifty and practical Chinese 
who have preceded, as in so many useful dis- 
coveries, have for centuries made a light use of 
the many gaseous emanations in the provinces of 
Yunnan, Szutschuan, Kuangsi and Schansi, by 
leading the inflammable air in pipes wherever they 
wanted for lighting or cooking. 

"But there is no place in the world more re- 
markable for its burning springs than Baku, on 
the western coast of the Caspian sea, where the 
holy and eternal fires are worshipped by the 
pious Parsees as the especial symbol of the Al- 
mighty. 

"Like most of the cloisters and convents of the 
Orient, which are exposed to the incursions of 
"plundering hordes, Aleschga, the temple dedi- 
cated to the worship of fire, is a fortified square 
enclosing a large court-yard, and capable of be- 
ing defended from the terrace roofs, the outer 
walls forming at the same time the back of the 
cells, which front the yard. Over the entrance 
gate, which is situated to the north, rises a high 






PACIFIC Oil. R| 



an additional di 

which, 
rent; 

their I 

fire. In th • the ornirr .pL-m- 

lumns ind 

nr tret in diam- 
•l to which the . lucted by a pipe 

the wall- of the temple. 
t the tout 

iiiilar manner. From th. 
the towel -idem called Thirsul. 

The P ate that the de I pus 

•he earth ami reigned with despotic 
fury. Hut man in his distress prayed to the 
Almighty and an angel came down and planted 
this identical trident in the earth as a token that 
the dominion of his Satanic Majest] had ceased. 
Around the court are twenty-two cells, like those 
atholic convent. They are very small anil, 
with the exception of the ragged rug, wholly 
without furniture; but each of them is provided 
with a gas pipe, which can he opened or 
at pleasure, and furnishes light and warmth to 
the inmates. Near the temple a well has lieen 
dug fifty feet deep, in which the gas accumu- 
lates in large quantities. Koch ('Wanderungen 
in Orients, ' IS4.1-4) tells us that he here en- 
joyed a sight more wonderful and surprising than 
he had ever witnessed before. A carpet was 
spread over the mouth of the well to prevent 
the gas from escaping. After a few minutes a 
priest siezed a bundle of brush wood, in which 
a piece of burning paper had been stuck, and flung 
it into the well after quickly removing the car- 
pet. The strangers had previously been warned 
to keep at some distance, and the priest and his 
assistants likewise ran off as fast as they could. 
About half a minute after the firebrand had 
been cast into the pit a terrific explosion took 
place and a vast column of fire in the shape of an 
inverted cone (from the gas spreading out as 
soon as it emerges from the pit) ascended to the 
skies. 

"When the Sassanides restored the religion of 
the Coroaster the attention of these fire-worship- 
ping princes was naturally directed to a place 
where a fire gushes pure and unbidden from the 
earth. 

"They raised a temple on the spot and thou- 
sands of pilgrims wandered to the holy fires of 
the Baku. But when the fanatical Arabs over- 
threw the Persian empire, times of persecution 
and distress began for the Parsees, and still later 
they were almost entirely extripated by the hordes 
of Pamerlane. During the last century fire 
worshipping was again introduced by the In- 
dians, who, after the Sefides had ascended the 
Persian throne, gradually ascended in the Cas- 
pian provinces, and whose number must have 
been considerable, as travelers inform us that in 
the latter half of the seventeenth century two 
hundred rich Indian merchants were residing in 
the town of Schemachi. But the anarchial times 
which followed the usurpation of Nadir Schah 
forced most of these Indians to leave their adopt- 
ed country and since then only solitary pilgrims 
have found their way to Baku. But the number 
of even these is constantly diminishing, although 
the Russians, to whom the sanctuaries now be- 
long, allow them full freedom of access. When 
Koch was at Baku he found there only five In- 
dians from Mooltan, whither the majority would 
gladly have returned had they but possessed the 
necessary means. Their squalid appearance and 
tattered raiment form the strongest imaginable 
contrast to the splendor of the element they wor- 
ship. Among them was a fakir, who had made 
a vow constantly to remain in the same position, 



■ 
id nrvrt n 

the ground near the tempi.- and 

ii. but even from the 
of the neighboring Caspian , ! ur lrs 

l.vrl! reteil In.. intless 

bubbles through the crystal waters above th 

N I and shoot up in bright flames at the 

:lit, so Dr. Abich mentions a spot 

'in the gulf of Baku where the inflammable gas 

u ith such force and in so great a quantity 

from the bottom, which is there three fathoms 

deep, that a small boat is in danger of being 

overturned when coming too near it. 

" Vs gas springs most frequently occur in dis 

tricts which have been the former seats of \ol 
canic action, and as similar exhalation 
arise from a -.till active crater, they arc supposed 
by many geologists to be the last remaining 
oi an expiring volcanic energy. Bischofi 

considers the carbonic acid ot the- German Lias 
springs to he developed by the composition of 
carbonate of lime bj volcanic heat or heated 
water. 

"A phenomenon which is sometimes found con- 
nected with gas springs is that of the mud vol- 
canoes, which may be described as cones of a duc- 
tile, unctuous clay, formed by the continued ev- 
olution of a sulphurous and inflammable gas, 
forcing up waves and lumps of liquid mud. These 
remarkable caldrons are found in many parts of 
the world. In the Island of Milo, in Italy, in Ice- 
land, in India, about 120 miles from the mouth 
of the Indus, on the coast of Arracan, in Bur- 
mah, in Java, Columbia, Nicaragua and Trinidad, 
but probably nowhere on a grander scale than 
at either extremity of the chain of the Caucasus, 
towards the Caspian sea on the east and the sea 
of Azos on the west, where in the peninsula of 
Caman and on the opposite coast of the Crimea, 
near Kertsch, vast numbers of mud volcanoes are 
scattered. Some of them are 250 feet high. 
Their operations have apparently been going on 
for countless ages and have covered a great ex- 
tent of land with their product. 

"The Macaluba, in Sicily, which owes its name 
to the Arab, is the mud volcano most anciently 
known. It is mentioned by Plato in his 'Phae- 
don,' and has been described by Stiabo. It is 
situated five miles to the north of Girgenti, on 
a hill of conical shape, truncated at the top 150 
feet high. The summit is a plain half a mile 
around, and the whole surface is covered with 
thick mud. The depth of the mud, which is sup- 
posed to be immense, is unknown. There is not 
the slightest appearance of vegetation upon it. 
In the rainy season the mud is much softened; 
the surface is even, and there is a general evuli- 
tion over it, which is accompanied by a very sen- 
sible rumbling noise. In the dry season the mud 
acquires greater consistency, but its motion still 
goes on. The plain assumes a form somewhat 
convex; a number of little cones are thrown up 
which rarely rise to the height of two feet; each 
of them has a crater where black mud is seen in 
constant agitation and incessently emitting bub- 
bles of air. With these the mud insensibly rises 
and as soon as the crater is full of it it dis- 
gorges. The residue sinks and the cone has a 
free crater, until a new emission takes place. 

Such is the ordinary state of the Macaluba; 
but, from time to time, the hill becomes subject 
to alarming convulsions. Slight earthquake 
shocks are felt at a distance of two or three 
miles, accompanied by internal noises resembling 
thunder. These increase for several days and are 
followed at last by a prodigious spout of mud, 
earth and stones, which rises two or three hun- 
dred feet in the air. 



and ai 
and ■■ 

the eruption flan 

prodigious height and n hour. 

. same time dense clouds oi smoke i 

from the crater, and mud and stones wc 

up to the height ot 3000 feet Six strea 
mud, the largest of which was half a mile 
flowed from the volcano, and their volui 
-aid to have been equal to 

Violent eruptive symptoms accompanied the 
formation ot a new mud volcano in the vicinity 
ot Baku, on the Caspian, On November 27, 
1827, flames blazed up to extraordinary height 
tor tine- hours, and continued for twenty hours 
more to rise aboul thn ibove a crater from 

which mud was ejected. \t another point in the 
Same district wfl . issued fragments of 

rock ot large size were hurled up into the air 
and scattered around. 

" The phenomena exhibited by the Macaluba 
and other mud caldrons are certainly very dis- 
tinct of those of two volcanoes, since no scoriae 
or lava or heated matter of any kind are sent 
forth, the mud being described its cold when 
emitted, although the gas, whose violent escape 
throws it up, is sometimes ignited. Hence geolo- 
gists commonly regard this phenomena as entirely 
distinct from the volcanic, and ascribe their origin 
to chemical action going on at no great depth 
beneath the surface, among the constituents of 
certain stratified matters, while other scientific 
authorities declare them to be as much connected 
with internal igneous agencies as any other erup- 
tive phenomena. Their occurrence in districts 
not remote from the site of vast volcanic dis- 
turbance, and their occasional violent paroxysms 
certainly afford much support to this view and 
show that it is probably the same power in differ- 
ent degrees of energy which cast up the mud of 
the Macaluba and pours forth the lava streams of 
Cotopaxi." 

The foregoing quotations not only show the 
great antiquity of natural gas, but supports state- 
ments made heretofore as to the generation of 
natural gas by metamorphic heat and its ascent 
through fissured faults and subsidences. 

AMOUNT OF NATURAL GAS IN CALIFORNIA. 

The area of the territory in the San Joaquin 
and Sacramento Valleys which has been shown 
by a number of wells and springs to contain 
natural gas, in solution with water, is over three 
hundred miles in length and more than thirty 
miles wide, two hundred and fifty-three billion, 
four hundred and forty million (253,440,000,- 
000) square feet. 

From the records ' of the formation passed 
through in drilling a number of wells in these 
valleys, the porous strata containing water with 
gas in solution in the first two thousand feet be- 
low the surface exceeds four hundred feet in 
thickness.- Consequently, there is in these val- 
leys, above the depth of two thousand feet, one 
hundred and one trillion, three hundred and 
seventy-six billion (101,376,000,000,000) - 
feet of porous strata saturated with water. 

It can be consistently estimated that each cu- 
bic foot of porous strata contains fifteen per 
cent by volume of water, making fifteen trill 
two hundred and six billion, four hundred 
lion (15,206,400,000,000) cubic feet of water. 

It is difficult to tell the amount of gas in so- 
lution with the water flowing from the present 
wells on account of the reluctance of the well 



PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 



owners to give any information regarding the 
same. But judging by the eye and from in- 
formation obtainable, it is safe to say that each 
two and one-half cubic feet of water flowing 
from the wells contain one cubic foot of gas. 
Therefore, the formation of tine valleys to the 
depth of two thousand feet must contain six 
trillion, eighty-two billion, three hundred and . 
sixty million "(6,082,360,000,000) cubic feet of 
gas. 

The third one thousand feet below the sur- 
face, judging by the upper two thousand feet 
and the fact that it is under an enormous pres- 
sure, should contain twelve trillion ( 12,000,000,- 
000,000) cubic feet of gas, which, added to the 
amount stored in the upper two thousand feet, 
would give eighteen trillion, eighty-two billion, 
five hundred and sixty million (18,082,560,000,- 
000) cubic feet of gas. 

If four hundred million (400,000,000) cubic 
feet of gas were used daily, making one hundred 
and forty-six billion (146,000,000,000) cubic 
feet annually, the amount of gas stored in the 
first three thousand feet below the surface of the 
Great Valley would last one hundred and twen- 
ty-seven years. 

Below three thousand feet beneath the sur- 
face, and extending to ten thousand feet or more, 
the unaltered rocks may exist, as is proven by 
the statements made heretofore, and natural gas 
may exist in vast quantities, which under the 
present appliances will be difficult to obtain, but 
human ingenuity may reach it. 

Gas in large quantities will be obtained in the 
upturned edges of the Creteaceous and Tertiary 
strata near the perimeter of these valleys that 
may lie buried many thousand feet below the 
center of the valleys. It is hard to say how much 
gas will be obtained from these outcropping strata ; 
it may equal the amount obtained from the over- 
lying beds. In that case 400,000,000 cubic feet 
of gas daily should be added to the above compu- 
tation. 

The above figures are of course approximate, 
but are rather under than over the amount of gas 
stored in strata extending three thousand feet be- 
low the surface. They are given in order to 
show the enormous volume of natural gas held 
in . solution in the waters beneath the valleys of 
San Joaquin and Sacramento and which can be 
procured by boring and other means. 

The great advantage that the Great Valley of 
California has over many other gas fields is that 
the water having natural gas in solution is 
forced to the surface by hydrostatic pressure, and 
by this the gas is liberated or the water with gas 
in solution is forced to near the surface, where it 
can be cheaply and artificially raised to the sur- 
face and the gas liberated. Whereas the waters 
in other gas fields do not raise to within several 
hundred feet of the surface, miking it unprofit- 
able to artificially cause the wells to flow gas and 
water from such depths below the surface. 

Artesian water can be obtained in 2,000,000 
acres in the Great Valley of California. Wells 
have demonstrated the fact that the deeper the 
well is bored the greater the lrydrpstatic prssure, 
and the more gas in solution. The greater the 
hydrostatic pressure the greater the artesian flow 
of water. 

Water will rise to near the surface in bored 
wells in the Great Valley of California in a ter- 
ritory exceeding 4,000,000 acres. 

If these wells on a territory exceeding 6,000,000 
acres contain sufficient gas in solution with the 
water, the wells that do not flow can be made 
to flow and the flow of the artesian wells greatly 
increased by using Cooper's gas-lift. 

For instance, a well at Stockton yielding 40,- 



000 feet of natural gas and 750,000 gallons of 
water can be made to yield 120,000 cubic feet of 
gas and 2,250,000 gallons of water. Twenty 
thousand cubic feet of gas would generate forty 
horse-power to operate the gas lift and leave a 
surplus of 100,000 cubic feet of gas, which could 
be employed in pumping distant water wells or 
used for other purposes. The 2,250,000 gallons 
of water raised by the gas lift could be used for 
irrigation. 

The gas territory in the vicinity of Los An- 
geles covers a territory about one-tenth the size 
of the Great Valley of . California and should 
yield forty million (40,000,000) cubic feet of 
gas daily for a period of one hundred and twen- 
'ty-seven years. This gas field will be more par- 
ticularly described in a future paper. 

Besides these two large gas fields there are 
many minor fields scattered throughout the Coast 
ranges of California. 

At the present time no one can tell or even 
approximate what the daily production of natural 
gas by the decomposition and distillation of car- 
bonaceous and bituminous matter amount to. 

New Years' Special Edition 



On December 31st we shall issue our an- 
nual New Years' Special Edition, which 
will contain a write-up of all the Califor- 
nia oil fields. This edition will be pro- 
fusely illustrated and as it will have a large 
circulation its value as an advertising me- 
dium is incalculable. 

TEN THOUSAND COPIES 

Will be circulated, and as we reach every 
part of the United States, as well as many 
foreign countries, you should not fail 
to avail yourself of the opportunity to ad- 
vertise your proposition, whatever it may be. 
Order your space by wire and send in 
your copy later. Choice of space will be 
allotted in the order contracts are received. 
Pacific Oil Reporter, 
318 Pine St., San Francisco. 

To "Well Drillers 



The State of Connecticut has many wells and 
these are sunk both in the drift and in the con- 
solidated rocks. The characteristics of some of 
them are set forth in tables prepared for the 
United States Geological Survey by Mr. H. E. 
Gregory and published in a report called "Con- 
tributions to the Hydrology of Eastern United 
States," which was compiled by Mr. Myron L. 
Fuller. 

A particularly significant feature of the C on ~ 
necticut well records is the fact that many of 
them were reported by the men who dug the 
wells. It is the desire of the Geological Survey 
to secure the co-operation of well-drillers in this 
work, and their attention is especially called to 
the pages of this report on which are listed 
over 175 wells drilled by Mr. C. L. Grant of 
Hartford, Connecticut, and 75 wells drilled by 
Mr. F. A. Champlin. 

Mr. Grant's list shows the county and town 
in which each well was drilled, the name of the 
owner of the well, its depth, the yield per min- 
ute, and the depth to water. The wells are all 
over 50 feet deep, ranging from that depth to 
over 600 feet. The supplies vary from a few 
gallons per minute to 250 gallons. There are 
ten wells with an estimated yield of 100 gallons 
or more per minute, 13 wells which flow at the 
surface, and many more in which the_ water 
comes within a few feet of the top. 

Mr. Champlin's records are of especial inter- 



est because of the completeness of the data fur- 
nished. Besides the county and town in which 
the well was drilled and the name of the owner, 
the date of the drilling is stated, and the situa- 
tion of the well is given, whether on a hill or 
in a hollow, on a plain or near shore. The 
way in which the water is obtained, whether by 
hand, by steam, or by windmill, is stated. The 
depth of the well, the depth to rock, the depth 
to water, the material in which the well was 
drilled, the cost of drilling, the supply of water 
per minute, the use to which it is put, and the 
quality of the water are all clearly tabulated. A 
noticeable feature brought out by these tables 
is the great quantity of water obtained from the 
freestone or sandstone belt along the Connecti- 
cut river as contrasted with the weak supplies 
from the crystalline or semi-crystalline rocks 
("granite"). 

The Geological Survey would be glad to re- 
ceive similar lists of wells from drillers in other 
States and to publish them in its annual volume. 
The report for the current year is listed as Water 
Supply and Irrigation Paper No. 102, and may 
be obtained, free of charge, from the Director of 
the United States Geological Survey, Washing- 
ton, D. C. 



Formation of Petroleum — 
Bert Bowlby's Theory 



Since our oil wells are fed by an almost inex- 
haustible supply we must consider what could 
be the most likely source of its origin. The 
source must be almost inexhaustible in order that 
the product could be likewise. It is necessary 
to depart from the subject of petroleum proper, 
to gather evidence with which to prove our the- 
ory. It has been proven that the atmospheric 
gases can be condensed by a combination of pres- 
sure with cold. And it is said that all gases can 
be condensed by the same process. In looking 
around for the inexhaustible source of the sup- 
ply, and knowing that all gases can be and are 
condensed by a combination of pressure with cold, 
we have arrived at the conclusion that the inex- 
haustible source is the heat on the interior of the 
earth, and that petroleum is a product of the 
gases generated by the heat on the interior. The 
gases are forced outward toward the surface by a 
pressure caused by the constant generation of 
gases, and as they come nearer to the surface 
they become cool, and being under great pres- 
sure, they condense. 

The very conditions that are necessary for the 
condensation of gases are known to exist on the 
interior of the earth. It is not presumed that 
the gases passed through the process of con- 
densation at the very depth at which they were 
found in a condensed state — petroleum — but that 
they were condensed at a point or depth below 
the earth's surface at which the temperature was 
of a sufficient degree to permit of the process of 
condensation taking place, and after the gases 
were condensed they were forced outward toward 
the surface by the intense heat pressure caused 
by the constant generation of gases behind them 
and they continue to come outward so long as 
there are cracks or crevices or pores in the rock 
through which they can pass. But coming in 
contact with a formation of rock in which there 
are no crevices or pores, they stop, and the pros- 
pector must 'drill down to meet them, when they 
will rush out at the top of the well, and con- 
tinue to rush out until the pressure on the rock — 
which has required thousands of years to gather — 
. has been decreased to such an extent that it is 
too weak to lift the fluid from the bottom to the 
top of the hole. When the well has ceased flow- 
ing, a pumping outfit is placed into it and the 




PACIFIC Oil REPORTER 



petrol 

nipol out through tu! 
But a when tin- pressure ■ 

• below thr bottom of the 
well which the prospector has drilled, bet 

iL that it will n • tlm'il From tin- 

lower depths up to the level with or into the 
bottom oi that well, ami that pro s pector aban- 
doiU his property, rather than lowering the piimp- 

tlit, because to lower the pumping outfit 
would require the drilling of a hole to ami into 
the ncM formal It containing oil and 

lust how tar below the upper or top for 
mation the second lies, no man can tell until 
he has ilrilleil a hole ileep enough to penetrate it; 
that is, in such localities where such holes have 
not been already drilled. 

Another tact which lends greatl) to the thcon 
that petroleum is thi iterated in the 



which produce petroleum 
I with the c\ i,!, 

■ ■in the well ire that 

as they were in tin • ,., that „j|[ 

"il the) i ut. ut with 

ire lower than .<_' .: 

above nd, ion which does not exist on 

the interior of the earth. 



Situation in Older Texas 
Districts Unchanged 



The situation in the Spindle Top. Sour Lake 
and Saratoga fields has not been altered bj anj 
new development oi importance. \i Sa 
I'd Prather brought in a well on the B. B. B. 
.\ C, tract, which is making about 7000 I 



..t fluid, all but 
■ 

this sand, 
reported to 
with tin- aid oi compn iscd , pro- 

production at Spur 
""'"■ the decline thai 

the older parts of the hill. Ten wells that made 
1 barrels in the month ol Jul) will not 

show a production of I0,000foi November. This 
in a seven- falling off, considering the short space 

of time which has intervened. The tield's pro 
duction is pui al 41 mi I to 4500 barrels. 

Ml III REPORT oi RAIL SHIPMENTS. 

Shipments of oil by rail are reported as fol- 
low s : 

Southern Pacific Fn u Lake, \m em- 




General view of flowing wells of the California Fortune Oil Company, in Sunset Oil District, Kern Go., California 



heart of the earth by the intense heat existing 
there is, that the gases coming from the mouth 
of an oi! or gas well do condense when they are 
subjected to a degree of temperature lower than 
32 degrees above zero. 

It is not an uncommon thing to see a man ap- 
plying heat to gas lines during the winter months. 
You ask him, "What seems to be the difficulty?" 
and he will reply, "The gas is frozen up and I 
am thawing it." He could just as easily say, 
"The gases have condensed and I am regenerat- 
ing them," for truly if the gases are warmed they 
become a liquid and pass through the pipes in 
liquid form, but if they are made hot and given 
a little more time, they will assume the same 
form they were in, when coming from the mouth 
of the well — natural gas — and if they are made 
still hotter, they will ignite and assume the same 
form they were in when they were in the heart 
of the earth, a fiery mass. 

Now the fact that gas is present in wells 



water. Mr. Prather expects to bring in an oil 
well before the end of the week. The English 
Company got a 500-barrel well at Saratoga last 
week, and if drilling operations now under way 
result favorably the production of the field will 
be largely increased by the end of December. It 
is now put at 2500 barrels. Batson has shown 
no improvement in gross production, and an es- 
timate of 9000 barrels a day is probably not far 
from the correct figure. 

Sour Lake has been attracting attention on ac- 
count of the deep sand developed on the Oliver 

California Fortune Oil Go. Stockholders: 

Please send your addresses to the office 
of the Company. 

CALIFORNIA FORTUNE OIL CO., 
626 Parrott Building, 

San Francisco, California. 



ber 1 to 26, inclusive (24th missing), 810 cars. 
From Gladys, November 1 to 27, inclusive, 99 
cars. No shipments from the Beaumont rack. 
Jennings oil : From Mermentau, November 1 
to 22, inclusive, 636 cars. From Jennings, No- 
vember 1 to 26, inclusive, 498 cars. From Egan, 
November 1 to 25, inclusive, 81 cars. 

Santa Fe — From Saratoga, month of Octo- 
ber, 450 cars; November 1 to 29, inclusivi 
cars company oil, 65 cars commercial rotal, 

396 cars. From Beaumont, November I to 29, 
inclusive, 34 cars commercial oil. 

Kansas City Southern — Fron 
cry (refined oil), November 1 to 28 
166 cars. From Texas Compan; ! rack 

(crude), November 1 to 28, inclusive, 71 cars. 
From Spindle Top (U. O. & R. Co.), Novem- 
ber 1 to 28, inclusive, 7 cars refined, 1 1 cars 
crude. Total, 173 cars refined, 88 cars crude. 




PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 



NEWS FROM THE FIELD 

Supplied by Our Regular Correspondents— Recent 
Developments in the Great Oil Fields o/ the West 



SANTA MARIA 



Santa Maria, Cal., Dec. 7. 
Again we have to report something extraordi- 
nary from Santa Maria. This time it is the 
Union Oil Co. well No. 1, on the Hartwell 
tract, just west of the Brookshire Oil Co. This 
well has been gushing since Friday last, and it is 
conservatively estimated that it has been dowing 
better than 8000 barrels a day. The oil is shoot- 
ing about twenty feet over the top "of the der- 
rick and a stream of oil as large as a man's 
body runs down hill toward Orcutt, where it is 
dammed up and pumped into tanks. 

Fully a thousand people visited the scene Sun- 
day, and it is the only topic of conversation on 
the streets of Santa Maria. 

Why more outside capital is not coming into 
the district is a mystery. There is plenty of 
territory to be had and a fairly good market for 
the product. The Santa Maria district is des- 
tined to be the largest and best producing field 
in the United States, if not in the whole world. 
The last five wells completed in the field have 
fully shown this. The Pinal Oil Co. No. .5 is 
doing about 700 barrels a day; Graciosa No. 3 
940 barrels a day; it is claimed the Kaiser well 
will go 800 to 1000 barrels a day; the Western 
Union Oil Co. No. 21 2000 barrels a day, and 
on top of this comes the Union gusher, which 
should settle to at least a 2000-barrel well. These 
five wells have a conservatively estimated capa- 
city of over 6000 barrels of 27 gravity oil every 
twenty-four hours. A report came from the 
field Monday morning, four days after the Union 
well started to gush, that it is producing at a 
rate of better than 12,000 barrels a day. This 
well is only drilled ten feet in the sand, and is 
about 2700 feet deep. 

The Brookshire Oil Company's No. 4 is only 
about 500 feet from this well and is down bet- 
ter than 2600 feet, so look out, for we will have 
another story to tell when that well commences 
to gush. 

The Union well is finished w.ith two strings of 
pipe, eight and ten inch, and the cost of the well 
will be considerably less than $15,000. Figuring 
at 50 cents per barrel the well has more than 
paid for itself since it commenced to gush four 
days ago. 

The Radium Oil Co., about one-quarter of a 
mile north of the gusher, is down close to 1400 
feet. It passed through about ten feet of oil 
sand at a depth of 1240 feet. There is practi- 
cally no doubt but what the company will bring 
in a good well. 

The Hall & Hall well is down better than 
1800 feet, and it is hourly expected to drop into 
the oil sand. They have seepages of oil and 
plenty of gas for the last fifty feet. 

The New Pennsylvania Petroleum Company 
spudded in on the 2nd instant and is making 
fair success. 

The Graciosa Oil Co. is building the rig for 
its No. 5 well, and will begin drilling as soon as 
No. 4 is completed. Its No. 2 and No. 3 are 
still doing their usual daily flow of 1370 bar- 
rels. 

An agent for the Rialto Refining and Oil Co. 
of Santa Clara county was in the valley during 



the past week taking orders for kerosene oil manu- 
factured from the Graciosa crude. They claim 
they are meeting with excellent success and have 
no trouble in selling their product, having no 
difficulty whatever in competing with the east- 
ern oil, both in quality and price. 

The Recruit Oil Co. abandoned its well on the 
Pezonni tract, near Los Alamos, at a depth of 
2100 feet. This company is down about 1800 
feet with its well in Cat Canyon, and about 2000 
feet with its well near Cosmalia. 

The Western Union Oil Co. well No. 21, 
which was brought in about 'ten days ago, is 
still keeping up the lick of 2000 barrels every 
twenty-four hours. This company is selling most 
of the product from this well to the Pacific Coast 
Oil Co. 

The Pacific Coast Oil Co. is now in the mar- 
ket for 24 gravity Santa Maria oil. Heretofore 
it has taken nothing below 25 gravity. 

Brookshire No. 3 was destroyed by fire during 
the past week. It is not known exactly how 
much damage has been done to the hole. The 
loss on machinery, lumber, etc., is close to $3000. 

Joseph Kaiser of the Santa Maria Oil Co. left 
during the week for New York City. It is his 
intention to interest enough eastern capital to 
purchase his land and do further developing work. 

The Coblentz Oil Co. is now building its rig 

for well No. 1. 

Joseph Reid of Oil City, Pa., inventor and 
manufacturer of the Reid gas engine, was in 
Santa Maria during the week and witnessed the 
Union gusher. He spoke in glowing terms of 
our oil field. 

There are at the present time thirty-three pro- 
ducing wells in this district, with an approxi- 
mate production of 8000 barrels a day. This 
does not include the Union gusher. Figuring oil 
at 50 cents per barrel, the average of each well, 
will pay interest at the rate of 4 per cent on 
more than a million dollars. 



COALINGA 



Coalinga, Cal., Dec. 5, 1904. 

The Peerless is pumping two wells, has two 
strings of tools running, and is rigging up No. 
5. The aggressive work is the result of finding 
a market for its oil, and it looks now as if the 
Peerless is endeavoring to make its Coalinga 
production compare favorably with its produc- 
tion in the Kern river fields. 

The Sour Dough Oil Company is in the oil 
with its No. 3; No. 2 is being drilled, and No. 
4 rigged up. Work will be rushed until the 
full quota of the ten wells is completed. 

H. B. Guthrie was successful in shutting the 
water off in the Roberts well, No. 1. The 
well has since been finished and is estimated to 
produce close to 100 barrels per day. 

No. 2 rig on the Arline has been finished. 

The York-Coalinga Oil Company resumed 
work after a shut-down of several months. The 
production goes to the Associated, but the C. O. 
T. Co. has laid a line to it and will commence 
to receive oil shortly. 

Fresno-San Francisco Oil Company has erect- 
ed its fourth rig, where drilling will commence 
by next week. This company is now delivering 
its royalty to the Associated, while" its produc- 



tion is still being delivered to the West Side Pipe 
Line Company. 

The New S. F. Crude Oil Company has just 
finished a water well on its lease on section 6. 
The lumber for rig No. 4 has been on the ground 
for two weeks. Drilling will be done by con- 
tract. 

The Shawmut Oil Company has succeeded in 
finishing its No. 1 and for the past week has 
been pumping at the rate of fifty barrels per 
day of 13 gravity oil. 

Part of the production of the Esperanza will 
go to the C. O. T. Co. The P. C. O. Co. is tak- 
ing the production from three of its wells, but 
No. 4 is too heavy to apply on the contract so 
arrangements have been made to deliver the same 
to the C. O. T. Co. 

The Caledonian Oil Company has erected a 
1250-barrel gauge tank, connected a pump and 
will be ready to make deliveries when arrange- 
ments have been made with one of the pipe 
lines. 

R. C. Baker has finished a 500-barrel gauge 
tank on his lease on section 23. The Associated 
will lay a line to it and take the entire produc- 
tion. 

The Commercial Petroleum Company has fin- 
ished all of its eight wells and within a few 
days all of them will be pumping. The produc- 
tion of the company will then in all probability 
exceed any on the West Side. With this expec- 
tation the Associated Oil Company will shortly 
lay a direct pipe line from its station on section 
7 to the Commercial tanks. The oil of the 
Commercial is a little lighter than the average 
on the West Side, some of it being as light as 
20 gravity. 

At the M. K. & T. everything looks active 
and prosperous. The water well has been fin- 
ished and it gives forth an abundant supply. Rig 
No. 2 is complete, which is considered the finest 
rig in the State, being 82 feet high, instead of 
74, and all the lumber contained in it is extra 
heavy and assorted. Two houses have been 
erected on the property, and the management is 
planning for five cottages in addition to the ones 
now finished. Its well is flowing a fairly good 
stream of oil. The reservoirs contain between 
4500 and 5000 barrels of oil. 

The Forty Oil Company has erected another 
rig on its lease. The well No. 1 will be on the 
beam inside of a few days, and from indications 
should be a good producer. The company is also 
erecting two 1200-gauge tanks. 

The Pacific Coast Oil Company has posted a 
notice announcing that it will receive oil from 
20 to 22 gravity, which it has heretofore re- 
fused. The price, for this grade of oil is quoted 
at 18 cents per barrel by the above named com- 
pany. 

v With the extension of the east side of the fields 
and the enormous increase in the production with- 
in the past year, the Pacific Coast Oil Company 
finds that its pumping plant on the east side is 
becoming inadequate to handle all of the oil ad- 
vantageously. Consequently the company has 
purchased a tract in section 36, 19-15, to where 
the present pumping plant will be removed and 
considerably increased. A crew of men is al- 
ready at work making grades for new houses 
and tanks. Over a'mile of six-inch pipe line has 
been laid, preparatory to connecting the new 
pumping plant with the present main line to 
Mendota. Strategically the new pumping plant 
will be so situated that all the oil from the east 
side of the field will gravitate freely into the 
tanks of the P. C. O. Co. The company is also 
taking up the four-inch line from its pumping 
plant on the West Side to the Wabash Oil Co., 



PACIFIC OIL RKPOK 



■ 

Wh 

•i the dcr- 
:llr«l in. which "ill citisr a dl 
in the operations until the nr. 
ic in the derrii • 

The - no» finishing up In 

Nii. 1, which promises to b .rll of verv 

. he material fur two gauge tanks 
tlir ground. Arrangements for a 
II he made at once after the completion 
. 1. 
California Oilfields, Limited, is building rig 
o 27. No. -'I is reported to be 
in the oil sand. Well No. 19 continues its dail) 
production of nearly 1500 barrels. The large 
machine shop erected on this property has been 
finished and most of the machinery installed. 
Several new camp buildings are under construc- 
tion to provide quarters tor the increasing labor 
force, which, we understand, numbers over sixty- 
five men. 

The Twenty-eight and Oil City Petroleum 
companies have removed to their new camp, situ- 
ated near the northeastern portion of the Twen- 
ty-eight < )il Company's lease, and consisting .4 
seven buildings. Both companies arc under the 
same management, and both keep a steady drilling 
crew constantly at work. 

W. P. Kerr, on section 34, has erected a rig 
on his twenty-acre tract. Evidently Mr. Kerr 
expects to begin drilling at once, as all prepara- 
tions arc made to that effect. 

v The producers about Coalinga, as well as the 
independent operators and owners in California 



■ 

I 

the Pacific on her u lulu. Thi 

.1! the new whai 
. in Montere] bay. H\ this route t! 

■ ship their 
product from their well, at Coalinga. 

Guthrej No. 1 has been finished and put op 
the pump at 1400 feet. It is making a fine 
.bowing. No. J is finished and is being pin 
on the pump. 

Alter a lapse of several years, during which 
no drilling lias been carried on at the Home Oil 
Company, another well is to he drilled. The en 
tire rigging, including the derrick, of No. 8, has 
been removed to the new location and used upon 
the new rig. The new rig is located close to 
No. 7 ol the Coalinga Oil Company's well and 
in the best part of the limited territory in "< >il 
City." 

The Coalinga Oil Transportation Company 
is now seeking more heavier oil to mix with its 
light oils from the East Side, in order to bring 
it down to a gravity not lighter than l''. The 
oil at present handled by this company averages 
above 21.5 gravity, which is too light anil con- 
sequently too dangerous to handle as fuel oil, 
and the gravity must be brought down or else 
the oil passed through stills. Several companies 
have connected up with the C. O. T. company 
within the past two weeks, all of which produce 
heavy oil, and are as follows: Shawmut Oil 
Company, Pennsylvania; M. D. & O. Co., Es- 
peranza, and a line has been laid to the York- 
Coalinga and Mercantile Crude Oil companies. 



S m Joaquin 
incorporated in the St 

the name of the Producers' I moil Pip, 

my. A representative ol thi 

l>i. Alexander Dallas, lias been in the field lot 
several weeks arranging the preliminaiv work 
and getting contracts signed with local i 
eis. \\ ,■ are authentically informed that more 
than 6,000,000 barrels ha igrted, with 

considerable n ore in sight, when the lim 
completion. The new pipe lim m to a 

point on the San Joaquin, from where the oil can 
i. led into vessels ami barges and shipped 
to San Francisco bay. The total length of the 
line is to be approximately 100 miles, ami 
he at least an eight-inch line, if not a ten-inch. 
Preliminarv surveys have been made in .1 corps of 
surveyors, finishing this week. The 
the Producers' Union Pipe Line Company in 
being able to get more than 6,000,000 bam 
01] on contracts in a comparatively short time, is 
due to the fact that it is offering more for oil 
than has ever been offered in the Coalinga field 
heretofore by any company for the same grade 
of oil. The price offered is 2^ cents per barrel 
for fuel, the same grade of oil which is now be- 
ing sold for at from IS to 2(1 cents per barrel to 
other pipe-line companies. As many of the com- 
panies that have signed up a certain amount of 
oil have no production as vet, it will mean that 
an unusual amount of drilling will be done in the 



BULLFROG 



Our General Manager spent several weeks at Tonopah, Goldfield and 
Bullfrog. Tonopah is a great camp; Goldfield is a greater camp, and has 
produced more gold in less time than any gold field ever discovered. 

Bullfrog was discovered by "Shorty" Harris in August. It is an 
enormous outcropping of quartz, 200 feet in width. Assay values on the 
surface have shown values as high as several thousand dollars per ton, and 
is considered the greatest discovery made in recent years. The present own- 
ers declined $100,000 for the property before any work was done. 

Bullfrog lies 70 miles south of Goldfield and is now organized as the 
Bullfrog Mining District. It is the judgment of practical mining men 
that it will prove far greater than the phenomenal fields of Goldfield or 
Tonopah. The discoveries already made in and around the Bullfrog dis- 
covery mine extend seven miles one way by thirteen the other. The Ha- 
zelton strike of a 20-foot ledge of $100 ore, and the Lonsway strike of 
$300 to $8,000 ore, and the Clark, Benson & Ladd properties, on which $1 
per pound ore is being sacked, and the original discovery that is now being 
worked has made tremendous excitement, and there is a wonderful rush to 
Bullfrog. Five town sites are being built up. Several thousand people 
are already on the field and everything is located for miles in every direc- 
tion. ' 

Around this original discovery, that consists of two claims, we have 
secured two claims on the west, one on the north, two on the east and two 
on the south that joins the discovery known as the Original Bullfrog Mine. 
We were offered $50,000 for the property, but declined it. We have in- 
corporated the Bullfrog Extension Mining Company; capitalization $1,000,- 
000; par value $1. The affairs of the Company will be handled by practi- 
cal mining men. 

A contract was let for sinking a shaft on the 100-foot ledge outcropping 
on the property and work started the 29th of November. The high grade 
ore will he sacked and shipments made at an early date. The Company 
does not owe a dollar on the property and has deposited in the Nye & 
Ormsby County Bank of Goldfield the money to pay for the shaft. 

We advise our customers to be exceedingly cautious about buying stock 
in those Companies that offer shares for two or three cents each. Many 
of them have only leases, or options to purchase. Some of them have nothing 
at all. The Bullfrog Mining Company is different. It has the best prop- 



erty in the field; it does not owe one dollar; has money in hank to pa\ foi 
the contract already let, and is a first-class proposition in every particular, 
with land values that are exceptionally good, the title to which is perfect. 
Experts have stated that it is equal to anything so far found at Goldfield or 
Bullfrog. 

We are offering a small block of stock at twenty cents per share, half 
cash, the balance in two payments within six months. It looks to us equal 
to anything so far found at Goldfield. We invite investigation and corre- 
spondence. Our stock will go rapidly. 

There are now five town sites at Bullfrog and hundreds of people are 
coming in daily. Property values have enormously increased in 
days. We have an option on and can sell four good claims joining our 
property at $30,000. We have a man on the field and are prepared to 
give up-to-date information. Correspondence solicited. Order a block of 
stock of the Bullfrog Extension Mining Company and you can make no 
mistake. 

AMERICAN DUCHESS OIL COMPANY. 

Stock now selling at ten cents per share. Will advance to twenty cents 
on January 1st. 

The land of the Duchess Company is proven. The management is of 
the best and has been endorsed by a great number of the best oil and mining 
papers. A GOOD PAYING WELL WAS FOUND IN THE FIRST 
SAND, at the depth of 800 feet. The oil was temporarily cut off. 
are now drilling for the second sand. The well is over 1370 feet deep 
in sandy shale carrying much oil and tremendous gas pressure. I 
SECOND SAND WILL MEAN A BIG PRODUCTION OF 
GRAVITY OIL THAT SELLS AT $3 PER BARREL.. When 
well is finished we look for the stock to go to $1 or more per share. 
The Duchess will be our next dividend-paver. Let us tell you about it. 
Write or wire for particulars. You had better wire and have 
stock reserved before the advance to twenty cents January 1, 1905. 

DEBENTURE SURETY COMPANY a-o 



Use the Wires. It Pays. 



Rialto Building, San Francisco. Cal. 



PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 



field. Just when work is to begin on the new 
line cannot be ascertained from the local repre- 
sentative. If this line is to be built, and every 
indication points favorably in that direction, Coa- 
■ linga will experience a boom unprecedented in its 
history. Particularly would it effect the West 
Side, where development has been at a stand- 
still, and where an enormous stretch of proven 
territory awaits development to yield excellent 
grades of fuel oil." 



The Production of Gas 
and Coke 



Since 1893, when the first plant of "by-product 
coke ovens in the United States was completed 
at Syracuse, N. Y., the quantity or coke pro- 
duced in such ovens has increased so rapidly 
that in 1903, 7.4 per cent of the total coke prod- 
uct of the United States was thus manufactured. 
The successful development of this industry has 
been largely due to the profitable disposition 
made of the by-products obtained in the manu- 
facturing process. A demand has arisen not only 
for information as to the total quantity and 
value of coke produced, but also as to the quan- 
tity and value of the gas, tar, and ammonia pro- 
duced at gas houses and at by-product recovery 
coking plants. In making its annual canvass of 
the coal mining and coke making industries- for 
the last two years, the United States Geological 
Survey has therefore extended its inquiries to 
cover all plants producing gas and coke from 
coal with the recovery of the tar and ammonia. 
Reports were received in 1903 from 528 com- 
panies. The facts gleaned from these reports 
are set forth by Mr. Edward W. Parker in a 
paper entitled "The production of gas, coke, tar, 
and ammonia at gas works and in retort coke 
ovens in 1903." The report is published as an 
extract from the Survey's forthcoming volume, 
"Mineral Resources of the United States, 1903." 

The total quantity of coal carbonized in 1903 
was 5,843,538 short tons. The 528 companies 
produced 33,483,430,989 cubic feet of gas, of 
which 2,433,969,478 cubic feet were lost or un- 
accounted for and 31,049,461,511 cubic feet were 
sold. Of this total 73.9 per cent was sold for il- 
luminating purposes and 26.1 per cent for fuel. 
The average price per 1000 cubic feet for all gas 
sold in 1903 was 97 cents. Prices for artificial 
gas are low in those States which have coal and 
natural gas among their resources. Such States 
are Illinois, Indiana, Kentucky, Ohio, Pennsyl- 
vania, West Virginia, and also Massachusetts, 
where a large portion of the coal gas made is 
a by-product from coke-making in retort ovens. 

The total production of coke amounted to 
3,941,282 short tons, of which 1,882,394 short 
tons were obtained from by-product coke ovens, 
and 2,058,888 short tons were the product of 
gas houses. 

Many coke companies are engaged also in the 
electric light business, and coke produced at the 
gas works, as well as a considerable amount of 
tar, is used for firing in the electric light plants. 
Other coal-gas producers are also producers of 
water gas, and the coke from the coal benches 
is used for firing the water-gas plant. Some coke 
is also used in the carbonization of coal at some 
of the gas works. It will be noted, therefore, 
that not all of the coke produced at gas works 
in the United States is sold, a considerable quan- 
tity of it being consumed at the works where it 
is produced. 

The total quantity of coal tar produced in 
1903 was 62,964,393 gallons, valued at $2,199,- 
969, or 3.49 cents a gallon. The largest pro- 
duction of tar in both 1902 and 1903 was in 
Massachusetts, with New York second, Ohio 



Flow of Natural Gas 
Increased by . . . 

Cooper's Gas Lift 

Also flow of water 
or oil increased and 
gas saved 

A. S. COOPER, C.E., 



219 Crocker Building 
San Francisco, Cal. 



AT A BARGAIN. 
Standard Drilling Rig with full equipment of 
small tools. Boiler and engine in first-class con- 
dition. Address Exchange No. 21, care this 
journal. 



WE SELL 



BARLOW & HILL 

MAPS 



UP-TO- 
DATE . . 



WHICH ABB THE ONLY 



RELIABLE MAP PUBLISHED 



La rge Blue Prints, $1.50 



Book containing Small Indexed Maps 
o! all the California Fields, each 



Per Dozen . 



50 
5.00 



WANTED — Position as Superintendent of an 
oil company. Thirty years' experience in 
Pennsylvania, Ohio and California. Best of 
reference. Address, 

"PETROLEUM," care this paper. 



We Promote, Finance and Incorporate 

Let us show you the advantages of incorporating your business or enterprise. 
If you need money to enlarge your business, permit us to secure it for you, by selling 
stock through our Eastern correspondents. 

CONSOLIDATED AUDITING COMPANY 

307 to 310 Mills Building, San Francisco. 
Telephone Bush 849. 



WRITE US TO-DAY ! 
If you want to invest your money in a sound business proposition where you are sure 
to receive ten dollars for every one dollar invested 

BUY BUFFALO-CALIFORNIA OIL STOCK. 
This company is incorporated under a special act of Congress providing for the incor- 
poration of companies in the District of Columbia, making our stock absolutely non-assessable 
We hold some of the most valuable oil property in the well known 

HALFMOON BAY DISTRICT, 
San Mateo County, California, 
Now possessing many fine oil wells producing 52° to 55° gravity oil. But we cannot tell it all 
here. Write us for full particulars. 

Correspondence with reliable brokers and agents solicited. 

BUFFALO-CALIFORNIA OIL CO., 

Fletcher Block, 

Livermore, California. 

C. V. Hall Iron Works 

(LOCATION, OL1NDA, ORANGE CO., CAL.) 

POSTOFFICE ADDRESS, Route No. 2, 
FULLERTON. CAL. 

Los Angeles Office, 222 Wilcox Building, 
LOS "NGELES, CAL. 

The C. V. H. Chain Tongs can be had through 
any dealer in oil well supplies. 

These tongs are made of the very best steel, 
in any size, and always give satisfaction. 

Manufacturers or users of chain tongs do so 
at their own risk, in any infringements of 
Patent No. 438,177, the ownership of 
which belongs to the undersigned. 

CHARLES VICTOR HALL. 




PACIFIC Oil I'ORTER 



tth. 

i cither in tin 

:!phatr. 

itch would he r<i 

pounds (it sulphate. The total quantit) <>t sul- 
phate of ammoni >5 pounds of sul- 
phate. The total quantit) "t sulphate "t ammo- 
nia produced and sold in 
pounds. The total production in 1903, reduced 

equivalent in sulphate, u .is 7' '. 747. J 1 7 
pounds. 

iparatively little progress has been made 
in this countn in the manufacture of chemi- 
cal products from coal tar. Although we produce 
(nc-r ; gallons of coal tar annually, we 

import at the same time millions of dollars worth 
of chemicals obtained from coal tar. A conser- 
mate would place the total value of 
products in the wholesale markets of this 
countrj at $12,000,000. 



Radium in Petroleum 



A chemist employed in the city laboratory at 
i in Russia has just finished some interest- 
ing experiments with petroleum secured in the 

Caucasian mountains. He began his experiments 
with the idea of finding out the best method of 
purifying it for use in the automobile industry, 
and in the operation, he says, discovered a verj 

table quantity of radium, far easier of ex- 
traction naturally than when it is in combina- 
tion with metals. The chemist, in an elaborate 
report to the scientific board, says that he be- 
lieves this will prove to be the secret of reducing 
the cost of the precious element, and has sent a 
specimen of the radium he has precipitated to 
Professor Curie of Paris. According to a num- 
ber of Russian scientists, who have communicated 
with the press about the matter, there is no rea- 
son why radium should not be found in petro- 
leum as well as in combination with other com- 
positions. 



Leschen's Get First Prize 



A. Leschen & Sons Rope Co. has been awarded 
three grand prizes at the St. Louis Exposition, 
being the highest awards over all competitors. 
These awards cover practically everything in the 
wire rope line, one award having been for wire 
rope, one for wire rope tramways and one for 
com eying and transmission haulage outfits. Wire 
drilling cables are rapidly coming into general 
use in California oil fields, in some of which they 
are used altogether. Their superiority over the 
Manila cable is conceded by all, and as they wear 
much longer it seems very probable that wire 
drilling lines will be universally adopted. Les- 
chens' drilling lines are much used in Califor- 
nia, where they have given the best of satisfac- 
tion. 



FOR SALE. 




share, 
share. 

W, BARNARD, 

Tenth Street, Oakland, 



We manufacture the best 
lubricating oils for oil 
drillers 

KING KEYSTONE OIL CO., 
204 Front St., San Francisco 



BARGAIN 

Complete Oil Rig for Sale 

Including two 8 1 ring Tools 
and Fishing Tools 

Over 8000 feet of casiog In ftOOd condi- 
tion—some never used— sizes, II H. 
9 is; 8 inch and 6 inch drive pipe 

The Above Property 
Cost Over $10,000 

and is tor sale at a bargain 

Exchange No. 22 

Care this Publication 




H 



KROHN 
WIRE ROPE SOCKET 

THE ONLY SOCKET USING A BALL CLUTCH 



/ \ 



LASTING QUALITIES UNEQUALLED 



PATENT 



CLUTCH 




DEVICE 



For Sale by ALL 

OIL WELL SUPPLY HOUSES 




r 



LLEWELLYN IRON WORKS 

SOLE MANUFACTURERS 

LOS ANGELES, CAL. 



Write for Circular 



i— 



READING 



( IRON ) 



@ 



Drive Pipe - = Casing - = Tubing = = Line Pipe 



j IS THE BEST 



R. H. HERRON CO. 



509 MISSION STREET 

SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 



PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 



HALFMOON BAY 



The Duchess Company has been making very 
good progress and has reached a depth of 1370 
feet in a very fine oil-bearing formation, and gas 
pressure continues very strong. Unfortunately, 
they had a delay in the shipment of pipe ;hat 
has caused them to lie idle for almost two weeks. 
They are now actively carrying forward work 
with a string of 4y 2 -mch pipe, and expect to 
reach the second sand at an early date. 

The Independent Company is making arrange- 
ments to begin the drilling of well No. 2 at 
an early date. The present well continues to 
show up as a good producer. 

The drillers on the Purissima are making good 
progress on well No. 9 of Sallee & Co. 

Eastern parties are negotiating for land ly- 
ing just east of the properties under the man- 
agement of J. E. Kerr of San Francisco. It is 
reported that they will start operations about 
the first of the year. 



Vaporin^s on tKe Gas 
Question 



If the Kansas crusade against piping natural 
gas out of the State were not so serious it would 
be amusing. Kansas newspapers, finding it prof- 
itable to cater to the popular craze on this sub- 
ject, are indulging in the most absurd and foolish 
tirades against the pipe line company. For in- 
stance, the Iola Record says: 

"The most popular way seems to be through 
the next legislature. One man suggests that 
when the legislature meets in January they be 
asked to pass a law compelling the company to 
bury their pipe 20 feet underground, to do what 
they can to throw next to impossible conditions 
about the company so that they cannot comply 
with the law. Of course, this law must be made 
to apply to all companies, but in the case of local 
companies its violation could be winked at as the 
violation of the prohibitory law is in certain com- 
munities. Whenever it becomes necessary to force 
a company out of business this law could be in- 
voked and the enterprise made unprofitable. 
Whenever it was necessary to permit its viola- 
tion the officers could turn their backs on the 
men when the pipes were laid." 

This sort of rot is as bad as it can be but there 
are other utterances as bad. The La Harpe Re- 
view, harping on the same subject, comes near 
advocating violence when it says: "The Review 
will never advocate lawlessness, but it will come 
as near it as it ever will in case an effort is 
made to pipe gas away from here. We have a 
right to this gas, the right of discovery, the right 
obtained by leasing out lands for a pittance and 
risking our money to prove that the gas was 
here and securing factories to use it. The Mis- 
sourians may claim that the Almighty made the 
gas for no special people, but the fact that he lo- 
cated it in this country seems to be prima facie 
evidence that he was preparing other kinds of 
fire for the residents of Missouri. The gas be- 
longs to Kansas and the Review offers its devil 
as a member of a pipe line wrecking gang any 
old time the gas thieves appear here." 



CALIFORNIA STOCK AND OIL EX- 
CHANGE. 



The following were stock sales in the Califor- 
nia Stock and Oil Exchange in the formal sessions 
held for the week ending Wednesday, Decem- 
ber 7: 

Apollo — 

100 shares at •. .35 

Associated Stock — 

18,409 shares at 24 

California Standard — 

400 shares at 15 

4,000 shares at 16 



FRESNO COUNTY ABSTRACT COMPANY 

Incorporated Under the Laws of California January 21, 1901. 

Capital Stock $100,000.00 

FUL-L.Y PAID UP 

SEARCHERS OF RE CORDS AND CONVEYANCE- 

Abstracts of Title Caref ully Compil ed at Reasonable Rates. 

NO. 1115 K ST., FRESNO, CAL 






NEW MAP OF COALINGA. 
Barlow and Hill, the famous up-to-date map 
makers of Bakersfield, Cal., have just completed 
data for a new map of the Coalinga oil field. 
This map will be the most complete of anything 
of its kind from this field. Each pipe line is 
carefully surveyed and each well carefully lo- 
cated. If you are interested in the Coalinga field 
you cannot afford to be without this map. Order 
it from makers or from the office of The Pacific 
Oil Reporter. 



Real Estate 
Insurance 



Oil Lands 

N. L. PALMER 

NOTARY PUBLIC 
COALINGA, = - = = CAL 



ALWAYS FIRST; 



Ever had trouble in getting the size 
of casing or drive pipe you needed? 



TRY USi 



We can help you. We carry ALL the regular 
sizes and the following specials: 

13^2 inch Boston " Diamond B" Casing 42 pounds 



12 V 2 
10 

9 5 /8 
&% 

65/8 
5^8 

4^ 

7 
5 

2 

3 



" 34 

" 35 

" 30K 

" 24^ 

20 

" 17^ 

" 17 

" 9-39 

Drive Pipe 23.27 ' 

" 14-50 

Tubing $y 2 

" ■&% 



Don't you think we can suit you? 



THE NATIONAL SUPPLY COMPANY 

Los Angeles, San Francisco, Bakersfield, 
Mc Kittrick, Coalinga, Santa Maria. 



PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 



■ 

-'I 

it 

it 23 

1,7 it .24 

shaies at 

Monte Crista— 

7^ 

lental — 

1,(1 u 

1,100 shares at 09 

( )il City Petroleum — 

shares at 63 

2,000 shares at 65 

Piedmont — 

ares at 07 

Reed Crude — 

.iiares at 2.05 

19 ' shares at 2. Ill 

Thirty-Three — 

250 shares ar 6.25 

1 '» entj -Eight — 

10 shares at 12.75 

120 shares at 13.00 

100 shares at 15.00 



Following are the latest 
of oil companies listed on 
and Oil Exchange: 

Alma 

Apollo 

Ass. Oil Co. Stk. Tr. Cer 

Aztec 

California-Standard 

Caribou 

Claremont 

Forty 

Four 

Giant 

Home 

Illinois Crude 

Imperial 

Independence 

Junction 

Kern 

Kern (New) . ." 

Kern River 

Linda Vista 

Maricopa 

McKittrick 

Monarch of Arizona 

Monte Cristo 

Nc\ aila County 

Occidental of W. Va 

Oil City Petroleum 

Peerless 

Piedmont 

Reed Crude 

S. K. & McKittrick 

Sovereign 

Sterling 

Superior 

Teck 

Thirty-Three 

Toltec 

Twenty-Eight 

Union 

United Petroleum . . . 
Wolverine 



quotations for stocks 
the California Stock 



Bid. 

.50 
.35 
.24 
.60 
.16 
5.50 
.80 
.35 
.54 
.22 
.42 



.21) 
4.75 



.18 

.10 

.28 
.75 

.08 

.64 

.07 
2.05 

.30 

1.75 

.04 

6.00 

.23 

12. on 

71.00 

100.00 



Asked. 
.40 



.17 
7.00 



.45 
.70 
16.50 
.33 
.21 



.30 
12.00 



.10 



.29 

.77'; 

.45 
.09 
.65 
.00 



3.00 
.31 

2.15 
.07 

1.15 



13.00 



.50 



WESTERN COOPERAGE CO. 

■ \M I IC 1 I HI Rfl OP 

STAVES and HEADING 

For Both Tlftht „„,l Slack Work. 
OUR SPECIALTIES ARE 

White Spruce Saves and Heading fir Tight Barrel States and 
all ready to set up lor Fish, Heading lor Oil, Lard, Pork, 



Pickles or Lard packages of 
any size. 



it, Etc., Etc. 

ooo 



Fir Slack Barrel Staves and Heading lor Asphalt, Lime 
Cement and Bottle Barrels. 



Prompt and Courteous Attention to all Inquiries. 



MILLS at Aberdeen, Wash, and floulton. Ore. 



SMITH, EMERY & CO. 

CHEMICAL ENGINEERS 
-TECHNICAL. OIL. WORK 



ANALYSIS Or 

Petroleum, Soluble S.-iIih. 

Asphalt, Coal, Coke. 

Residues, Feed Waters, 

Snlphur. Drinking Waters, 

Gypsum, Minerals, Etc. 



Umpire Work on Oil Contract*. 
Chomlcnl and Physical Laboratories. 



83-85 New Montgomery Street 
SJtN FRJtMCISCO, CJtL. 



Lacy Manufacturing Company 



Manufacturers of 




Steel Water Pipe 
General Sheet 
Iron Works 
Oil Well Casing 
Oil Stills 

OIL STORAGE AND WAGON TANKS 

Works: Cor. New Main and Date streets, P. O. Box 231, Station C. 

Baker Block Telephone Main 196 

Office, 334 North Main Street, Los Angeles, Cal, 

BATES' 

PATENT CASING TONGS 




1416-1426 19th St.. Bakerstield, Cal. 



Fills a long-felt want. No more need of 
pole and rope for screwing up casing. Bates 
Tongs can be applied to the casing anywhere 
in driving or pulling without danger of injury 
or parting casing. 

Set No. 1, with any two size jaws from 9$^ 
to 13^ inches. 

Set No. 2, with any two size jaws from 4 to 
954 inches. 




CAR TANKS AND STORAGE TANKS 

FOR Al_l_ USES 

We Carry in Stock Car Tanks of following sizes: We Carry in Stock Storage 

6,000 Gallons 

7,000 

8,000 

nd can mount on wooil or steel underframes. 



it 
t. 



of all sizes up to and including 
35.000 BARRELS 

Oil Refineries Complete Oar Specially 



WARREN CITY BOILER WORKS 

OFFICE and WORKS;-WARREN, OHIO. 



H 



PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 



NOTES. 



J. E. Kerr, the well known oil and mining op- 
erator, has just returned from Goldfields, Nev., 
where he has been successful in organizing a min- 
ing company with excellent holdings. 

H. B. Guthrey was in San Francisco the first 
of the week. 

The Imperial Oil Company has just paid its 
regular monthly dividend of 20 cents per share. 

The Thirty-three Oil Company's regular 
monthly dividend of 10 cents per share is now 
payable. 

The Kern River Oil Company will pay a divi- 
dend of 25 cents on December 15. 

The recent strength in Union Oil stock is ex- 
plained by reports of a gusher which has been 
developed on the Union claim, Santa Maria. 

The Standard Oil Company has given notice 
to the Kern river producers that it would buy 
no more oil for the present. Recently the com- 
pany has been paying 15 cents per barrel for 
Kern oil. 

The California Oilfields, Ltd., dating from 
April, 1901, was more iortunate in the year 
ended June 30 last than most of its European 
competitors, says the London Financial News. 
After allowing for depreciation and writing off 
the balance of the preliminary expenses, the ac- 
count shows a profit of £32,832, and a disposal 
balance of £37,272. The dividend is to be made 
up to 10 per cent for the year, £5000 is set aside 
as the nucleus of a reserve fund, and £7272 will 
be carried forward. During the twelve months 
the deliveries amounted to 858,121 barrels, being 
a satisfactory increase over 1902-1903, while the 
quality of the oil of both the light and heavy 
grades is being maintained. ■ 

Mr. Julius Ebel, editor of the Santa Maria 
Times, has been in town during the week. A 
special number of the Times will be isued at 
Christmas time. 

Work is progressing fast at the Pacific Coast 
Oil Company's plant in grading for the large 
addition to the acid works. The steam shovels 
have taken out a large amount of earth and rock, 
but there is considerable yet to be taken out. 
The ground excavated is used for filling up 
the marsh, and a large area has already been 
filled in. Just east of the present brick acid 
building a large frame building about 250 feet 
long has been erected for an ore house, where the 
rock from which the sulphuric acid is extracted 
is stored. Some little distance further north 
frames are up some 400 or 500 feet long for 
ore bins. 

With two fuses which had been lighted and 
which had burned up into the very heart of a 
mass of explosives, thirty-five sticks of dynamite 
were found on the morning of December 5th in. 
place just over the pipe line which connects 
its electric light plant and the searchlight would 
Zeigler, 111., with the pumping station.' The dy- 
namite was discovered at 10 o'clock in the morn- 
ing by Private Martin Thompson of Company 
C, of Carbon, who was on duty near the pump- 
house. The spot where enough dynamite was 
found to blow into atoms the source of power 
of all the machinery in the Zeigler mines was 
the exact location of the bitter shooting of Sat- 
urday morning, when the soldiers were hur- 
riedly concentrated in the rain and sleet. The 
sticks were badly frozen, and to this fact is 
ascribed the reason for the non-explosion of the 
dynamite. It was found placed immediately over 
the pipe-line, 250 yards from the pumphouse, 
and about one-half mile from Zeigler. The 
pipes are buried sixteen inches under ground, and 
had the explosion taken place Zeigler, its mine, 
have been put out of business. 



H 



PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 

is the only 

OIL JOURNAL 

Published on the 

Pacific Coast. 

It gives full, fresh and authentic oil news from 
all the oil districts, new and old. It exposes 
fraudulent oil companies. It gives the latest 
information on oil stocks and dividends. It 
describes the latest method of drilling wells, 
pumping, piping and storing oil; use of oil for 
road making, etc. 

It is the only paper which advocates the beliel 
that California's refined asphalt is the equa. 
of Trinidad asphalt for paving and other pur- 
poses, and is In every way superior to bitumi- 
nous rock, the use of which has given San 
Francisco, Oakland and other California cities 
so many poor streets. 

The subscription price is $2.50 a year. If you 
are Interested in any way in California oil, cut 
out the following coupon, fill In the blank lines, 
and send it, accompanied by check, money 
or express order to the 

PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 

318 Pine St. San Francisco 



Subscription Blank 



[I YEAR $2.5P 

6 Months 1.50 
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Pacific Oil Reporter 

818 Pine Street San Francisco. 

Please enter- my subscription to the PACIFIC OIL RE: PORTER 

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Slgned- 



Address- 



Date- 



PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 



,M 



Vol. 6. No. 7 



San Francisco, Cal., Saturday, Dec. 17, 1904 



Price Ten Cents 



KANSAS-INDIAN MKRiroRY. hand "' ln '< c ' as 6 "' producers and \\c t 

Oil of 3i ' . degrees gravity 82 tn:m t ' u ' ,r work, although they hide behind tie 

Oil of 31 degrees gravity 77 name of "Standard Oil." Strange it is that 

( >il nf 30>._. degrees gravity ?-' tfiSse producers who n ^airpt 

Oil of 30 degrees gravity f)7 starvation oil pnees; who i ; i the most talking 

Oil of 29} ■_; degrees gravity 62 when the agency was projected, were not prfi- 

degrees gravity 57 cut at the signing up of the production. Now 

( >il nt JS' .. degrees gravity 52 while the agency is making an endeavor to place 

28 degrees gravity 47 its output at a profitable figure the "scab" pro- 
ducer is laying quiet, hut don't forget that you 
Rin' \i I.. . . 

will see his hand and it will he just when vou 
Kerosene, Pearl, per gal., l9%c;Astral, 10',,-; ^ you |)ave a ^ contract , anded| on , y tf) 

Star, 19%c; Extra Star, 24c; Eocene, 23c; find fte has Tiriderbid you one cent. 

Elaine, 26c; Water White, in bulk, 13c; do ., . . , .,, 

,. , - , r ... , ., , No conservative mind will now attempt to 

150 deg., 13c; do, extra line. 15c; Mineral Seal, 

kki io . a um„ oni/„. i„ „,. 0.1. . deny that the agency is going to be a success. 
iron hols., LSc; wooilen bbls., iOioc; do, cs., J4c ; - b ' b * 

Deodorized Stove Gasoline, in bulk, 16c; do, in It is going about its business in a, way that as- 

cs., 22!uc; 86 deg. Gasoline, in bulk, 25c; cs., surcs this, and already many contracts, at an at- 

31c; 83 deg. Naphtha or Benzine, deodorized, in tractive figure, are practically closed. Now 

bulk, per gal., 13c; do, in cs., 19y 2 c. w]lat is the matter with ''blacJlSjing" that 

"scab?" Give him a reasonable period to get 

We have all seen what labor organizations int ° !inc anu if he fails to do so make his road 

• , ^ , -r ■. . , ,., _«■* so rough that he will want to change his course, 

might become if it were not for the ever present & . . ■ ., 

. Warn prospective customers against dealing with 

scab. Whenever organized labor has made a . . T , .,. ,, , . ■ .. u , „r 

b him. Keep within the law, but give him a bed of 

stand against low wages, long hours or other thistles so that he cannot sleep _ A i; ttle of t jjj s 
alleged wrongs, we have witnessed the "scab" w ;n bring Mr. "Scab" to his senses. 

in his element. A "scab" is a person without 

principal, morals or honor, who, when organized 
labor is making a stand against oppression, for-" 
• sakes his organization and keeps at work at what- 
ever pay may be allowed him,- working- any-n-um- 
ber of hours, and bearing the insults of both 
his employers and brother workmen without 
complaint. He has no standard of morality. 
When the differences between employer and or- 
ganized labor are finally adjusted the "scab" is 
discharged, for he is not the kind of an employe 
that an intelligent employer would want on his 
pay roll. Then, too, the "scab" must be dis- 
charged before organized labor will resume. 
Then the "scab", is put on the black list of the 
organization covering his particular trade and he 
is not allowed to join. If he was already a mem- 
ber he is dropped and blacklisted. These men 
are carefully watched and if he is ever employed 
again his brother workmen will make it so un- 
bearable for him that he is glad to either change 
his occupation or to change his name and seek 
green fields and pastures new. 

Now after about six months of strenuous labor 
part of the independent oil producers of the 
Kern county oil fields have organized into a body- 
called the "Independent Oil Producers' Agency," 
the purpose of which is to curtail the production 
to such a degree as to advance prices to a figure 
that will allow the profitable development of 
the oil fields and pumping of the wells. The 
organization is officered by practical oil men se- 
lected from the already large membership. The 
organization embraces practically 60 per cent of 
the production of the Kern fields outside of the 
Associated Oil Company and that contracted to 
the Pacific Coast Oil Company. Now what 
about the other 40 per cent? Is it in the hands 
of "scabs" who, when a price has been fixed 
by the agency, will sell for a cent a barrel less? 



PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 

Published W, 

The Oil Authority of the Pacific Coast. 
Indorsed by California Pctrolrum Miners' Ass'n, 



Maria R. Winn, Proprietor. 
EASTMAN, Editor and Manager. 



OFFICE AND EDITORIAL ROOMS 

318 Pine Street - - San Francisco, California 
Telephone, Bush 176. 



TERMS. 

One Year $2.50 

Six Months 1.50 

Three Months 1.00 

Single Copies 10 

STRICTLY IN ADVANCE. 

Money should be sent by Postal Order, Draft 
or Registered Letter, addressed to Pacific Oil 
Reporter, 318 Pine Street, San Francisco, rooms 
31-32-33. Communications must be accompanied 
by writer's name and address, not necessarily for 
publication, but as a guarantee of good faith. 

Entered in the Postoffice at San Francisco, Cal- 
ifornia, as second class matter. 

Latest Quotations 



The prices offered by the Pacific Coast Oil 
Company for spot California crude oil at the 
wells are as follows: 

COALINGA. 

Price 
Gravity at 60 deg. temperature. per barrel. 

Oil of 22 deg., up to, but not including 24. .$0.20 
Oil of 24 deg., up to, but not including 25 . . .30 
Oil of 25 deg., up to, but not including 26 . . .35 
Oil of 26 deg., up to, but not including 27 . . .40 
Oil of 27 deg., up to, but not including 28 . . .45 
Oil of 28 deg., up to, but not including 29. . .50 
Oil of 29 deg., up to, but not including 30. . .55 
The Associated Oil Company is offering 17% 
cents for fuel oil. 

SANTA MARIA. 

Gravity at 60 deg. Price per barrel 

Temperature. at Port Harford. 

25 deg., up to, but not including 26 $0.50 

26 deg., up to, but not including 27 55 

27 deg., up to, but not including 28 60 

28 deg., up to, but not including 29 65 

29 deg., up to, but not including 30 70 

30 deg., up to, but not including 31 75 

31 deg., up to, but not including 32 80 

32 deg. and up 85 

KERN RIVER. 
Price subject to contract. Few offers at less 
than 25 cents. Greater part of independent pro- 
duct held for better prices. 

EASTERN QUOTATIONS. 

Pennsylvania $1 .60 

Tiona l-'5 

h ■ 1 37 

Corning l ■ J ' 

New Castle 1-47 

North Lima 1-07 

South Lima ' 1-02 

Indiana 1 -CH 

Somerset 1.01 

Ragland 60 

Petrolea (Ont.) . . . 1 -5 3 



The steamer "Dakotah," owned by the Stan- 
dard Oil Company, is here from Shanghai and 
Moji, twenty-four days from the former and 
twenty-one day's from the latter named port. 
While here the "Dakotah" will be fitted with 
oil burners and in the future utilize oil for fuel. 
.She is already fitted with tanks. She will sail 
in a few weeks with a; cargo of oil for Asiatic 
ports. Since the favorable report of the Fuel 
Board there is considerable activity in converting 
coal to oil burners, and it seems probable that 
the day is not far distant when all steam pro- 
pelled vessels touching at Pacific ports will con- 
sume oil for fuel. Our navy is making installa- 
tions of oil burners in many of its torpedo boats 
with the best of results, and it seems certain that 
the entire Pacific squadron will eventually burn 
oil in lieu of coal. 



We fear that it is. We have already seen the 



The Standard Oil tank steamer Atlas sailed 
on Monday last week from New York for San 
Francisco by way of Cape Horn. The Atlas 
has in tow steel tank barge No. 93. The dis- 
tance to be covered is 14,000 miles, and it is the 
first attempt ever made to tow a barge around 
the Horn. 

Many attempts have been made to tow barges 
on long ocean trips, but few have been entirely 
successful. The strain on the steel Ijawse 
which the barges are held to the steamer ?.' 
has been sufficient in heavy weather to cause 
them to part. 

In order to obviate that difficulty the 
has been equipped with cylinders that will 
volvc as the strain on the hawsers through 
sea^ increases; allowing more of the steel cable 
to play out. Then, as- t'; 

they will revolve in an opposite direction, taking 
in the slack cable. The barge will carry a cargo 
of 20,000 barrels on .the voyage, 

■ 



PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 






Natural Gas in California 

j& j£> By A. S. CO OPER, M. E. <e? <& 



XI. 

BEHAVIOR OF GAS WELLS. 

In a former paper it has been shown that there 
is no liquid gas in the known oil fields. 

There is but little free gas in nature, but there 
are oceans of water holding gas in solution. 

When the drilled wells, A B, Fig. 22, pene- 
.trate the porous and seamed strata of an an! icline, 
encased in practically impervious cover, the po- 
rous and seamed strata containing free natural 
gas lying above water and subjected to great 
hydrostatic pressure, the gas will flow- from the 
well and by decrease of pressure natural gas 
will be liberated from the water. The underlying 
and adjoining water must be saturated; that is, 
it contains all the gas it will absorb, and hold hy- 
drostatic pressure, and temperature being consid- 
ered. Unless the water is saturated there will be 
no free gas present. When the gas yielding strata 
is first penetrated if the well is closed for some 
time a gauge will show a high pressure, say 433 
pounds to the square inch. If the amount of 
water which enters the outcroppings of the porous 



the water is very slow. If the circulation of the 
water was rapid soluble material would have 
been leached from the formation and carried 
away by the water ages ago, and the water would 
not have time to become charged with natural 
gas. 

This decreased pressure is not sufficiently re- 
sistant to the incension of the water producing 
the hydrostatic pressure, the surface of the un- 
derlying water slowly rises until finally it reaches 
the bottom of the well, then a struggle between 
the gas and water for possession of the well be- 
gins which is prolonged for a greater or less 
time, but always results in a victory for the 
water. The life of the well can sometimes be 
prolonged by removing the ascending water by 
artificial means. If the existing hydrostatic pres- 
sure is insufficient to raise the water above the 
mouth of the well, the well ceases to yield either 
water or gas. 

If the hydrostatic pressure is sufficient to raise 
the water above the mouth of the well the well 
will flow water and gas in the proportion of 100 
cubic feet of water to sixty-five cubic feet of gas. 
As the gas by decrease of pressure will be liber- 
ated from the water below the mouth of the 



TABLE A. 
Table showing approximate amount of natural gas which 100 volmes of water will absorb and 
hold in solution at different depths, and pressures at a temperature of 60 degrees Fahr. 

To the cubic feet of gas in table add 4 volumes of gas amount held in solution by atmospheric pres- 



hj 


O 


O 


►d 


„. tf 


o 


13 


O 


O 


t— *1 




M. B 




3g 


~. a 






~. B 


a * 


3 t3 


3 tf 


^ M 


3 ff 


HI 


3 t) 


3 er 


^£ 


*,* 


o 
ID 


►u g 


*j3- 


W°- 


hjB 


** 




§3 

3 


%^ 


s*i 

as 


3 


£4 


B » 
3 


£3 




p. 


. r+ 


o* 


Cfl 




o" rl " 


W 




o' r+ 




'. 1 


. p 




. *i 


3 




• 1 


3 


.433 ! 


1 1 


.13 


433.000 ] 


1000 | 


130.00 


t 866.000 | 


2000 


260.00 


43.300 | 


100 | 


13.00 


476.300 | 


1100 | 


143.00 


| '909.300 | 


2100 | 


273.00 


86.600 j 


200 | 


26.00 


519.600 | 


1200 | 


156.00 


| 952.600 | 


2200 | 


286.00 


129.900 | 


300 | 


39.00 


562.900 | 


1300 | 


169.00 


1 955.900 ] 


2300 


299.00 


173.200 1 


400 | 


52.00 


606.200 | 


1400 | 


182.00 


| 1039.200 1 


2400 


312.00 


216.500 1 


500 | 


65.00 


649.500 


1500 | 


195.00 


| 1082.500 | 


2500 | 


325.00 


259.800 | 


600 | 


78.00 


692.800 | 


1600 1 


208.00 


| 1125.800 | 


2600 ] 


338.00 


303.100 ! 


700 | 


91.00 


736.100 | 


1700 


221.00 . 


| 1169.100 | 


2700 


351.00 


346.400 ] 


800 | 


104.00 


779.400 | 


1800 | 


234.00 


| 1212.400 | 


2800 | 


364.00 


3S9.700 | 


900 | 


177.00 


822.700 | 


1900 | 


247.00 


| 1255.700 | 


2900 


377.00 





strata producing the hydrostatic pressure is small 
when compared with the amount of gas with- 
drawn, the closed pressure will gradually de-- 
cline, say to 216 pounds. 

By consulting table A it will be seen that by 
reducing the pressure on the water containing the 
gas in solution and underlying the free gas will 
have parted with half its volume of gas. At 433 
pounds pressure to the square inch one cubic 
foot of water will hold in solution one and three- 
tenths of a cubic foot of natural gas. Under 
216 pounds to the square inch one cubic footr of 
water will hold in solution sixty-five-hunuredths 
of a cubic foot of gas. Consequently in reduc- 
ing the pressure from 433 pounds to 216 pounds, 
sixty-five-hundredths of a cubic foot of gas was 
released from solution. When the ocean of water 
usually underlying the free gas is considered the 
immense volume of gas liberated from the water 
can be imagined. 

The -water accompanying natural gas and hold- 
ing natural gas in solution is very frequently min- 
eralized with salts and minerals of different de- 
scriptions. This mineralized condition of the 
water is strong testimony that the circulation of 



well it will act as a natural gas light, causing the 
well to flow more water and gas than it would 
by the hydrostatic pressure alone. As a general 
thing the greater the hydrostatic pressure the 
larger the flow of water and gas. 

If the well yields water and gas and the hy- 
drostatic pressure is great and the amount of 
natural gas in solution large the water will be 
blown from the well in the shape of a spray. 
A certain decrease of pressure and the amount 
of natural gas in solution will cause the well to 
flow water containing large bubbles. When the 
pressure is still further reduced and the amount 
of natural gas in solution is small the propor- 
tion of water coming from the well will be large 
when compared to the amount of gas present and 
the bubbles of gas will be small. 

In the above described actions of wells the 
larger the amount of gas the greater natural gas 
lift, the natural gas lift playing a very important 
part in the ascension of water and gas. The 
natural gas lift decreasing the weight of the col- 
umn of water in the wells removes the pressure 
from the water in the well, permitting, the lib- 
eration of natural gas held in solution. Pressure 



may be removed to such an extent that natural, 
gas may be liberated from water lying below the 
bottom of the well ; in this" case a large flow can 
be expected. 

. The natural gas lift can be reinforced by Coop- 
er's gas lift.. 

The well B, in Fig. 22, will have a great ad- 
vantage over wells in its neighborhood. Being 
situated immediately above the fissure E F, nat- 
ural gas liberated by decrease of pressure in 
lower porous beds, then the bed C D, containing 
water with gas in solution, takes the path of least 
resistance, which is through the fissure E F to the 
bottom of the well B. Friction opposes the flow 
of gas through porous strata to well A, even if 
it is only a short distance from well B. 

The hydrostatic or closed pressure is usually 
the same for all the wells of a particular gas 
field, showing a general connection of the wells 
throughout the field. Still there are obstructions 
or barriers that cause the wells to vary largely in 
production. Besides the flow of the wells them- 
selves this is also shown by the effect of tor- 
pedoes. Wells that yielded but little or no gas 

JjEGENO 



oooa o o a o oO o oo a 
oonoooooe°<>°°° 
aoanooooaooavx- 



CONGLOMERATE 



SHALE 



SANDSTONE 




8ITUMIN/ZED SAND 






SERPENTINCUS 






METAMORPBIC 



u>^< c /-?v-t.-). 

> L < A/ -?>■- -'- 



GRANITIC 



-J — » - ! ■■» • 



^fsr~ 



L/MESTONE 






ALLUVXM- 



have when shot produced gas in greater or less 
quantity, sometimes a large flow. 

If more than 300 feet of a column of water is 
removed and kept removed from a well 1000 
feet deep, which yields water containing one and 
four-hundredths cubic feet of gas in solution 
with one cubic foot of water, gas will be liberated 
from solution with the water in the well and un- 
derlying water, for the reason that the hydrostatic 
pressure on the water will be reduced to less than 
346 pounds, a pressure that is necessary to hold in 
solution one and four-hundredths cubic feet of 
gas with one of water. (See table A.) 

In wells in which the hydrostatic pressure is 
capable of holding in solution more gas than 
the water contains, and where the hydrostatic 
pressure does not force the water with the gas in 
solution to within hundreds of feet of the surface, 
the idea of obtaining water with gas in solution 
or free gas from such wells is a forlorn hope. 
The . height to which the water will have to be 
lifted is too great to be accomplished economi- 
cally by artificial means. Wells of the above 
character do not occur in the Great Valley of 



PACIFIC OIL R] 



to near t 
In a syncline « here the ; 

I where the 
r with 
: the earth, wells 
drill' uld yield water 

with tor the res- 

tated from the water hy decrease 
■•':ii it-; pi 

generation would aacend to the summit of the 
anticline and would n ough wells drilled 

in the syncline. 

1 he thrnl we should 

seek the anticlines if we want i pedally 

when they are fissured in their lower strata, nod 
that gas in solution with artesian water is more 
easily obtained in the synclines than in the anti- 
clines. 

Professor Edward Orton says: "What is 
known a- closed pressure in a L T as well is the 
maximum pressure reached when the gas is shut 
in the well. 

"The closed pressure varies in different fields. 
With some remarkable exceptions the closed 
pressure is generally the same for all the wells 
of a particular field, whatever their production 
may he. 

"When a reservoir of gas is penetrated the gas. 
suddenly released from a pressure of 400 pounds 
or more to the square inch rushes out with amaz- 
ing velocity. 

"The pressure is due to a water column that is 
behind the gas. The porous stratum that makes 
the reservoir of gas and water and which always 
has an impervious roof somewhere, rises to the 
surface. Water entering at its outcrops will ex- 
ert its pressure through all the flexures of the 
stratum upon the water which it contains, and 
thus upon the accumulations of gas that are held 
within its arches and terraces of the stratum. 
This explanation makes the flow of gas depend 
upon precisely the same cause that occasions the 
flow of water from artesian wells, viz., a water 
head of greater or less elevation at a greater or 
less remove. 

"When gas is drawn from a field the closed 
pressure declines and continues without change 
or abatement until reaching 200 pounds or less. 
Then, in a short time the well is overrun with 
water, which is forced by hydrostatic pressure 
to the same height in all the wells in the same 
field, generally rising to within one or three hun- 
dred feet of the surface. The reduction of closed 
pressure is not restricted to wells that are drawn 
upon for supply. It extends to all the wells of a 
particular field and nearly all alike. A well that 
has been constantly locked in and that has never 
furnished a foot of gas for use reaches approxi- 
mately the same pressure that the most heavily 
taxed wells show. 

"Two companies arc engaged in the manufac- 
ture of salt in the Meade county, Kentucky, field 
from the brine that accompanies the gas, the lat- 
ter being used as fuel. The supply of brine is said 
to be failing both in quantity and quality. That 
the brine should lose its strength when drawn 
upon continuously is a result that should natur- 
ally be expected. The depth at which it is found 
is too shallow to allow of any great movement 
except by dilution from the surface waters that 
enter the gas rock to the eastward. The salt 
water, which was always aggressive, overran many 
of the we! Is that were neglected, but where it 
was taken care of properly by pumps the gas 
has shown the same remarkable tenacity that 
the Moreman has displayed. 

"The Tippecanoe well was drilled about seven- 



ble the effect nt the torpi was 




VARYING 





•1^ 



& ^;^ 



VARYING 




s\ 

X 



V 




INTERVAL 



1st 



*%& 



■^y^A 



INTERVAL 



Fig. 22 is an attempt to expi 
the behavior of gas wells 
gas in a formation. 




ain diagrammatically 
and the action t ■' the 



added. The r. 

■^''r been this time in the St. .v. The 

open pressure of the well for the ft! 

the explosion of the torpedo was thin 

pounds; on the second day, eighteen 

the third day. eleven pounds. Another well was 

drilled within sixtj feet of this great well. The 

nplete failure, even afl 
ing heavily torpedoed, 'lhc T 
thought to have struck a crc\ ice in the rock. The 
Tippecanoe well is situated near the line of the 
Findlaj monocline, and notable fracture could 
occasion no surprise in strata that are bent down- 
ward I Si l tVet in one-fourth of a mile. 

"The Hutson well is beyond question the larg- 
est gas well ever dulled in Ohio. Thus far none 
"t the great wells have hem struck until the field 
had undergone a good deal of development. This 
well was n,. sooner brought in than a do/en wells 
were located hy different interests as near to it 
as thej could find standing ground. One only of 
these proved large, and its volume was hut little 
more than one-half of the volume of its great 
neighbor. Still more inexplicable is the his- 
tory of a well drilled within sixty feet of the 
one last named. When the gas rock was reached 
less than one-half of the volume which the new 
well sought to rival was found in it. There are 
many such cases as these already on record." 

The attending conditions and actions of these 
great wells indicate that they derive their sup- 
ply of natural gas from fissures. Fissures that 
approach vertically cannot contain free gas when 
the overlying beds contain water; therefore, the 
supply of gas must come from underlying beds 
containing water with gas in solution. The gas 
being liberated from the water by decrease of 
pressure. The released gas not only acting as a 
natural gas lift in the well, but also in the fis- 
sure. 

The Shacklett well, Meade county, Kentucky, 
has the following record : 

Cased at 348 feet ; gas struck at 429 feet. Salt 
water was found as soon as the shale was tapped, 
and after it had been drilled into for seven feet the 
water rose in the tubing 420 feet, within nine 
feet of the surface. A little gas was found at 
seven or ten feet in the shale, the entire thickness 
of the gas rocks being found to be sixty-three feet. 
The gas had energy enough when first struck to 
free the tubing from water once in twenty-three 
minutes, in geyser fashion. The interval soon 
extended to several hours, and presently the ac- 
tion ceased altogether. The well was then tor- 
pedied, but the effect was only to increase the 
water. The gas was snuffed out finally by this 
treatment. If this well, where the water nearly 
reached the surface, had been pumped by Coop- 
er's gas lift it would have yielded gas. 

There is probably as much gas in the aban- 
doned gas fields of the Eastern States as has been 
taken from them. It is in solution with water 
and cannot be obtained by the present methods. 
In order to secure this remaining gas the water, 
or part of the water, will have to be brought 
to the surface, as is done in California. I\ 
wells which are now abandoned in these Eastern 
fields would have lasted a long time after the 
time of their abandonment if the water or ,>art 
of the water had been removed. But lie op- 
erators had been taught to believe that the gas 
they obtained was free gas, whereas in fact 
amount of free gas they obtained was ins: ; 
cant when compared to the amount which came 
out from solution from underlying water. Be- 
lieving only in free gas, the consequence was that 
when the water began to enter a well they 
thought the gas was exhausted and submitted to 
the entrance of the water without a struggle. 



PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 



Liquid Fuel for Furnace 

Equipment 



By W. N. Best, Mechanical Engineer of the W. 

N. Best International Calorific Company. 

For many years liquid fuel has been success- 
fully used in the heating, of. iron, especially in 
forges for the heating of rivets in boiler shops 
and structural work. These furnaces are of pro- 
portions adapted for the sizes of rivers to be 
heated, and many are portable. , In bailer shops 
liquid fuel has been found to. be far superior to 
coal as fuel not only in furnaces for heating riv- 
ets, but also in large furnaces for sheet and an- 
nealing purposes because large furnaces can be 
heated so quickly and evenly that there is no 
comparison between this and other fuels. 

For the past five years on the Pacific Coast, 
where liquid fuel is abundant, extensive experi- 
ments have been made to use crude oil as fuel in 
blacksmith shops in place of the ordinary black- 
smith coal or coke. The tests have been highly 
satisfactory and this fuel has. proven to be su- 
perior to every other fuel because, first, the welds, 
are perfect, as there is no corosion of the metal 
as is the case with coal or coke fuel; second, the 
iron is made more homogeneous, and third, the 
o.utput of the shop is greatly increased. A small 
oil furnace can be constructed at a very small 
cost without skilled labor, in which a blacksmith 
can heat several pieces of iron or steel at the 
same time, and can turn out the same amount of 
work with one oil furnace as can be turned out 
by five ordinary coal forges, because the iron is 
always waiting on him instead of his being com- 
pelled to lose so much time making the fires and 
waiting on the iron to heat as is the case when 
coal is used.:in forge work. 

It is because of this increased output and be- 
cause of the superior quality of metal produced 
that liquid fuel is fast becoming a potent factor 
in the manufacturing world, and when we look 
upon the various fuels from the thermo-chemical 
standpoint, it is surprising that the world has 
been so slow to recognize the value of the new 
fuel. California crude oil contains 20,680 Brit- 
ish thermal units (B. T U.) per pound; Texas 
crude oil contains 19,060 B. T. U. per pound, 
while gasoline contains 14,200 B. T. U. pei 
pound, and coke contains 13,500 B. T. U. per 
pound Bituminous coal averages 13,180 B. T. 
U. per pound, but there is a two-fold loss with 
this fuel, first, because heat is. required to liber- 
ate the gases, and second, many of the volatile 
gases it contains are wasted by their passing 
away in the form of smoke. Combustion is the 
energetic unity of the oxygen of the air with 
some combustible. The air necessary for com- 
bustion gives out its oxygen to the hydro-car- 
bons, changing them from carbonic-oxide (carbon 
monoxide) to carbonic acid (carbon dioxide), 
which is the product of complete combustion. 
Liquid fuel- when thoroughly- atomized delivers 
its' hydro-carbons freely, thus allowing the vola- 
tile gases to mingle with the oxygen of the ad- 
mitted air, and this fuel has a decided advan- 
tage over coal in that coal requires heat and 
time for the decomposition necessary to free the 
hydro-carbons. 

While at present there are sections in the 
United States where crude oil is expensive and 
difficult to obtain, yet developments are rapidly 
advancing and oil is being found in many parts 
of our country and in Canada and Mexico in 
localities where a few years ago the inhabitants 
would have laughed at the mere suggestion of 
there being any oil in their neighborhood.. When 
we consider that forty gallons of crude oil is 
equal to one ton of coal in blacksmith practice 
and the increased output of iron or steel effected 



by its use as well as the economy in time and 
labor because this fuel does not have to be han- 
dled and there are no ashes to be disposed of, 
the price of fuel is scarcely worthy of consider- 
ation. In- manufacturing centers coal tar and 
oil water gas tar are obtainable at small cost 
and may be used where oil is scarce. They are 
valuable fuels in that they contain greater heat- 
ing properties than either coal or coke. Tar 
from coke ovens contains' 16,263 B. T. U. per 
pound, and tar from oil water gas contains 
16,970 B. T. U. per pound. 

Although crude oil contains more heat units 
per pound than any other fuel, yet the results 
obtained depend largely upon the method of 
equipment. Properly constructed furnaces and 
perfect atomization of the fuel are essential fea- 
tures for success. Thousands of furnaces are 
daily being operated at a serious loss to their 
owners, who are wholly ignorant of their great 
loss in both output and fuel. Of all the poor 
constructions in the shop equipment in large 
or small plants for marine, railroad and contract 



in fuel, a decreased output and disappointment 
to the owner and operator. 

Oil furnaces and forges can be constructed to 
meet the requirements of the class of work with-' 
out regard to the shape of forging to be handled. 
In the blacksmith shop of the Department bf 
Construction and Repair of the Norfolk Navy 
Yard not one pound of coal or coke is used, for 
here liquid fuel has proven its superiority over 
all other fuels for all classes of work, and cer- 
tainly in marine service the requirements as to 
the quality of metal are as severe and the forgings 
are as intricate to heat as in any other branch of 
service. 

In furnace practice compressed air should al- 
ways be used to atomize the crude oil, distillate, 
or tar used as fuel, as it assists combustion, ef- 
fects a saving in fuel, increases the output and 
also increases the life of the refractory lining 
of the furnace. When compressed air is not 
convenient, steam may be used to atomize the 
oil and a volume blast of air produced by a fan 
blower or a root blower should be admitted 





ELEVATION 

OIL BURNER FOR STATIONARY BOILERS 




Perspective View fv. i-- r " VerticalS.ection 

OIL BURNER FOR LOCOMOTIVES 



work, furnaces are the most prominent, and, 
strange to say, often the officer in charge of the 
department thinks his furnaces are ideal in con- 
struction. Often liquid fuel is tried in furnaces 
and condemned, when the fault lies not in the 
fuel itself, but in its application. I have met 
many competent officers who stated that a weld- 
ing heat cannot be obtained with this fuel be- 
cause they had not considered the heat values of 
the several fuels, but after they have once seen 
it properly applied, they are delighted with it 
and become staunch admirers of the new fuel. 

A furnace constructed for the burning of coal 
as fuel requires various changes to meet the re- 
quirements of liquid fuel, but these changes can 
be made at a slight expense, as the body of the 
furnace need not be altered. With the requisite 
changes made, any degree of heat desired, from 
a cherry red to a welding heat, can be attained 
in much less time than with coal, and an almost 
increditably even distribution of heat maintained 
because radiation is perfect, and hence the metal 
is evenly heated. An oil furnace should be of 
such design that the oxygen can so unite with 
the atomized fuel that an incandescent heat and 
not flame is seen in the charging space of the 
furnace. A box-shaped oil furnace means a waste 



into the furnace to furnish the ,rj,xygen neces- 
sary to effect combustion. 

A hydro-carbon burner of such construc- 
tion that it will thoroughly atomize the liquid 
fuel by dashing every drop of it into ten thou- 
sand molecules, and which will produce a flame 
that will spread the full width of the modern 
oil furnace and thus give the necessary rever- 
beration, should always be used. Some people 
attempt to economize by making a burner out of 
a piece of gas pipe, but after sixteen years' experi- 
ence with liquid fuel in marine, locomotive and 
stationary boilers and in various kinds of fur- 
naces, I am compelled to term such burners dis- 
mal failures because such contrivances do not 
and cannot atomize the fuel. The quantity of 
fuel used through the burners should be carefully 
regulated for a superfluous amount of hydro- 
carbons in the furnace means a waste in fuel 
and. is detrimental to. the metals being heated, 
while not enough of the hydro-carbons means, 
a superfluous amount of air and oxidation of. 
iron. All oil forges and furnaces used in black- 
smith shops, should >be of such construction that 
only one hurner will be required, for a black- 
smith can regulate a modern oil furnace equipped 
with one burner very quickly and so perfectly 



PACIFIC OIL RK PORTER 



further attrnt 
number of burners are used it will certain 

■• ihera and will require al- 
der to keep the 
• I in the furnace and the 
in both the quant/ 
quality of the output. In an oil furnace equipped 
with a hydrocarbon burner which thoroughly 
atomises the fuel, combustion is so perfect that 
■ smokestack is not needed, and should never 
be used, tor it allows a quantitv ol heat I 

mpanying illustration is vt a hydro 
carbon burner which received special mention by 
the Liquid Fuel Board of the I 'nited States 
which recently tested a great giuj types af 
burnei 91-100 of their report of 

In this burner the liquid fuel is siphoned 
out of its channel by the atomizer and because 
of this peculiar construction any grade of liquid 
fuel is thoroughly atomized. It is the only burn- 
er which successfully 'burns tar fuel, and it : s 
particularly adapted for furnace work of all 
kinds because it produces any width of flame de- 
sired, either a long, narrow flame, such as is re- 
quired in furnaces for structural work, or a fan- 
shaped blaze S feet 6 inches in width, which is 
often required in large furnaces. 

The superiority of oil over coal as fuel is as 
great as that of coal over wood, and each suc- 
ceeding year will note great advancement in the 
use of liquid fuel, for a test always convinces 
the most skeptical of its real merit. The in- 
creasing demand for this fuel is a compliment 
to its value and will stimulate the development 
of new oil fields until the supply equals the de- 
mand. 



Development of the Min- 
ing Engineer. 

By Robert H. Richards. 

Looking back through the eye of the imag- 
ination to prehistoric times, we may form a con- 
ception of an order of advance in things mining. 
The primitive man picked up colored stones, 
bored holes in them, and wore them as amulets 
for decorative, religious and medicinal reasons. 
He found the precious stones and prized them 
for their decorative effect. . He found the gold 
nugget, and learned later, that he could polish, 
flatten and shape it, thus making a beginning 
in the metal manufacturing art. Gold and pre- 
cious stones at a very early date must have risen 
in value and begun to be property, and also be- 
gun a career as a medium of exchange. A com- 
plete mining plant, at this rime, may have been 
an area of land with ore specimens scattered 
on the surface of the ground and buried in the 
surface soil, with a few- men digging with pointed 
sticks and moving the soil with rude wooden 
shovels. The existence of ownership in the soil 
and mineral may have come later. 

Stimulated by mineral discoveries, the miner 
made efforts to define, identify and name his 
mineral species, and so gave a beginning to the 
science of mineralogy, and his efforts to estab- 
lish rules of occurrence of his valuable minerals 
did the same for geology. The primitive Asi- 
atic, at an early date, found the effect of fire on 
minerals, and picked up lead, copper or iron in 
the ashes of his camp fires. Cornwall tin was 
found in the same way. The primitive metal- 
lurgist then experimented with his fires and got 
silver by burning up his lead, and bronze by 
alloying] copper and tin. The possibilities fas- 
cinated him, the getting stimulated the desire to 
get and the ingenuity to fashion the tools to 'get: 
with. There came to be a systematic use of fires 
for roasting ore, reverberatories for desulphuriz- 
ing ore, crucibles for melting cupels for purifying 



hearths and - 
t, the metal lin. 
ulate the development of thi 
pushrd by his metallurgical partner 
the end ol the lot the suriai 

iking it from tin ;;, |, K -tunc 

hammers. Mr found that by heating thi 
and quenching it with w iter it would crumble 
more easily. In fact, this was probabl) the chief 
method of mining tor m.un centuric 

A mine at this period may have been a pit or 
trench twontv feet deep, more or less, from which 
the ore and water were carried out on men'-, 
using a tree with stubs of branches for a 
ladder. In time the metallurgist bund that hv 
manipulating In- iron in connection with carbon 

he could harden it, and thai the hardness was 
grcatlv augmented h\ quenching it in water. Hi 
had made the discover] ol steel and of tempering 

it. The miner asked for a better hammer and 
got one ot steel, and with it the point which, 
l>\ blows ol the hammer, chips and severs the 
ore from the ledge. The hammer and point, 
schlegel und risen, must have been the standard 
mining tools for many centuries. 

1 he primitive American mined copper at least 
500 years before the discovery of this country 
by Europeans. This is indicated by counting the 
rings in tree trunks growing in their old workings. 
They mined the copper with stone hammers, 
heating the rock with fire to make it more friable. 
rhey mined to a depth of twenty or thirty feet, 
but rarely went underground; used wooden shov- 
els to move the rock, and wooden bowls and 
bark troughs to dispose of the water. They did 
not w ant and could not use pieces of copper larger 
than a few pounds, which they took as they found 
them, and beat out cold into shapes, leaving the 
silver attached to the "copper. They apparently 
-'had' no 'knowledge of concentration or of smeltr 
ing. They used the copper for tools of the house- 
hold, of the chase, and of war, as well as for 
decorative purposes. 

The making of iron tools enabled the miner 
to penetrate the . ground. He devised ropes, 
buckets and rude windlasses for lifting out ore 
and water. His roof and walls of rock began 
to fall in on him, and it was necessary to bring 
in timber props and to leave pillars of ore to 
hold the walls apart. About this time the horse- 
windlass and a better quality of rope must have 
been designed for hoisting from greater depths. 
Mines may have reached a depth of hundreds of 
feet with tunnels and galleries which, though 
small in size, were cut out with a care and finish 
almost like that of the stonemason's work on 
public buildings. Such tunnels of 300 years ago 
can be seen today in the German mines. The 
metallurgist asked for cleaner ore, free from 
earthly and siliceous impurities which hindered 
or prevented his smelting operations ; to effect 
this, the crude stamp mill for crushing, and the 
sweeping huddle for concentrating ores were de- 
veloped. ; gj 
As to the period when the mineralogist, the 
geologist and the chemist occupied separate pro- 
fessional ground, investigating everything in their 
lines and contributing from their stores of knowl- 
edge to the benefit of the miner, I will not try 
to decide. But the time has never yet been reached 
when the miner could afford not to have a good 
working knowledge of those subjects. 

The next great step was the use of drill and 
blasting powder (A. L. 1620). The slow, tedi- 
ous chipping was replaced by the more rapid drill- 
ing and blasting out of rock masses, and i the 
speed of mining increased immensely. Later (A. 
D. 1776) the steam engine came to the help of 
the miner. The pumping engine came first, fax 
removing water, and then the hoisting engine. 



About A l>. 1832, the locomoti 
■ 
W sometimes think of all on, 
pending on or pertaining to the steam engine, 
whereas the true engineer Is a man who 
the moan- at hand to accomplish his 
ever tin -. m;» be. He can use precedent 

as it wi go and must fill in the rest from his 

brain. He mav have to harness up a wat 

on the side ot a mountain, bring down 
iii a great pipe, and level gravel bills with a 
et more powerful than those used by our 
city fire departments. Or. he mav have to use 
the water to compress air and convey it in pipes 
to his mine and use it there to drive liis power* 
tul hoi-ting and pumping machinery and his 
power drills tor drilling the rock. In ISliO, nitro- 
glycerine was introduced as a powerful blasting 
material, adding to the speed and econom] of the 
work of excavation. 

The miner, by his needs of prime movers, trans- 
mitting machinery, transporting machinery and 
use of water, has contributed much to the 
velopment of the mechanical engineer, and 
less degree to the railroad engineer and hydraulic 
engineer. The miner and the agriculturist really 
take shares in opening up a country and making 
civilization possible. They are both fundamental 
callings, taking the good things from the ground. 
The farmer has probably helped more in the de- 
velopment of the railroad, while the miner's field 
has given him a greater hand in developing power, 
machinery and hydraulics. Later these all be- 
came independent professions, and having made 
great advances in their own lines they now in 
their turn contribute advanced ideas for the bene- 
fit of the miner. 



Drillers at Isthmus 



The United States Civil Service Commission 
announces that the following examinations for 
the Panama canal will be held January 4, 1904: 

Foreman of diamond drill boring party; age 
limit, 25 to 50 years; salary, $150 per month;, 
applicants must be experienced in the use of dia- 
mond drills and be competent to set diamonds. 

Foreman of wash boring party ; age limit, 25 to 
50 years; salary, $125 per month; applicants 
must be experienced in the use of well-boring 
drills and machinery of the wash-boring type. 

Boring party helper; age limit, 20 to 40 years; 
salary, $75 per month ; applicants should have 
had experience in connection with the use of bor- 
ing or drilling machines on engineering or min- 
ing work. 

Foreman of laborers; salary, $75 to $83.33 per 
month ; applicants must be capable and energetic 
and have had good general experience in han- 
dling gangs of laborers on extensive excavations 
or other similar engineering works. 

Assistant foreman of laborers; age limit, 25 
to 40 years ; salary, $50 to $60 per month ; ap- 
plicants must be energetic and should have had 
experience in handling gangs of laborers on ex- 
tensive excavations or other similar engineering 
works. 

General foreman of laborers; age limit, 25 to 
50 years; salary, $100 to $125 per month; ap- 
plicants for this position should have had at least 
three years' general experience in handling g 
of workmen or laborers on extensive excav; 
or other similar engineering works and must be 
capable of successfully supervising and directing 
the work of large gangs of laborers. 

Persons who desire to compete should at once 
apply to the United States Civil Service Com- 
mission, Washington, D. C, for application form 
1(IS2. No application will be accepted unless 
properly executed and filed in complete form with 
the Commission at Washington prior to the hour 
of closing business on January !•, 1905. 



PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 



NEWS FROM THE FIELD 

Supplied by Our Regular Correspondents— Recent 
Developments in tne Great Oil Fields of tne "West 



COALINGA 



On the 3rd instant the Associated Oil Com- 
pany made the announcement of an advance in the 
price of oil from 15 to 17% cents per barrel. 
This advance will effect quite a number of the 
producers on the west side, who are now deliv- 
ering their production on daily runs without 
contract. We have knowledge of contracts that 
have been signed with the Associated recently in 
which the price stipulated is 19 cents. Similar 
offers have been made to other producers on con- 
tracts. With this advance made by the Asso- 
ciated we learn that the C. O. T. company is 
making similar offers, and in one case has offered 
as high as 20 cents. It is plainly noticeable that 
the demand for heavier grades of oil by the three 
pipe lines on the west side has forced the price 
up to its present rate, and the more optimistic 
men even predict that within a few months all 
the oil produced will be readily sought after at 
20 cents. The production on the .west side for 
nearly a year has been decreasing rather than 
increasing, in spite of the fact that within that 
period two new pipe lines entered the field. With 
19 cents for all oil produced the producer is 
encouraged to do more development work, and it 
would be no surprise if the west side would re- 
turn to its former activity of increasing its pro- 
duction at the rate of 10 per cent per month. 

The six-inch pipe for the Associated line to 
the west side, extension is now coming in and work 
laying it will be resumed. The line will be a- 
six-inch main, instead of 7% inch, with four- 
inch branches to the St. Paul-Fresno, R. C. 
Baker and Union leases. 

The name of the companjr operating the twen- 
ty-nine acres of W. P. Kerr on section 34, is the 
Missouri-Coalinga Oil Company, rig No. 1 is in 
readiness for the drillers, and work will com- 
mence shortly. 

The Mercantile Crude Oil Company is now 
delivering the bulk of its production to the C. O. 
T. Company. A portion of its production still 
goes to the P. C. O. Company. 

Peerless Oil Company commenced drilling on 
its No. 5 last Saturday. In all the company is 
running three strings of tools, and has the lumber 
on the ground for another rig. 

Sour Dough Oil Company perforated its No. 
3 last Tuesday, but it will be some days before 
the well will be in condition to determine its 
productiveness. In No. 2 the drillers struck the 
sand a few days ago. Work on rig No. S will 
commence the coming week. 

The California Oilfields Limited is making 
the first attempt of drilling a well with a gas en- 
gine. The Reed gas engine, which is being suc- 
cessfully used for pumping wells, will undoubt- 
edly also replace considerable of the steam power 
now used in drilling wells if the attempt made 
by the Limited proves a success. 

Westmoreland-Coalinga is now drilling on its 
third well. The production of the two produc- 
ing wells is practically 350 barrels a day. 

The Independence Oil Company has com- 
menced work on the first of the three wells it 
will drill. The rig for No. 9 is nearly finished, 
and the other two will follow in succession. 
Seven wells are being continuously pumped by 
the company, whose production is classed as one 
of the best in the field. 



The W. K. Oil Company, a new corporation 
composed largely of Coalinga men, filed copies 
of its articles of incorporation last week. The 
new company has located on the north half of 
section 2, 20-15, where it expects to drill a well 
in the near future. The capital stock is given 
at $500,00. Its directors are C. G. Wilcox, A. 
Crowley and J. W. Crowley of Visalia, George 
Barber, H. C. Kerr and W. C. Riley of Coalinga, 
and J. W. Nair of Los Angeles. 

The Octave met with a misfortune in its No. 
2 well by losing a tool, which will necessitate 
the abandoning of the hole, as it cannot be re- 
gained. The derrick will be moved to one side 
and drilling resumed. 

The Northwestern Oil Company, on section 
26, reports a depth of 1950 feet with a showing 
of gas. Indications are so favorable that the 
stock has been withdrawn from the market. 

California Oilfields Limited has reached .a 
depth of 2000 feet in its test hole on section 29. 
While a very prolific sand has been passed 
through and cased off, the management is de- 
sirous of determining whether a deeper sand can 
be reached. If necessary drilling will be car- 
ried on to a depth of 2500 feet and if nothing 
better is encountered the sand that has been 
passed through will be perforated and the well 
put to producing. The same company is erect- 
ing rigs Nos. 24 and 25 on section 27, and has 
made a location for No. 7 on section 21. 

Section 10 Oil Company has erected a derrick 
and a bunkhouse on the southeast quarter of 
section 10, 19-15. 

The total number of driling rigs in the field 
is 43, which is by far the largest number in the 
history of the field. Besides there are fifteen 
new rigs, all of which will be drilling in two or 
three weeks. The usual number of men required 
for each rig, outside of helpers or teamsters, is 
four, making the total number of men employed 
in actual drilling 172. On leases with pumping 
wells the number of employes varies from one 
man to the well to one man to three wells. One 
company, the largest in the field, has sixty-five 
men on its pay roll. A number of others have 
from fifteen to twenty. The total number of 
men actually engaged in the production of oil 
in this field is close to 500. The dependents 
upon the oil field directly or indirectly in the field 
and in town is estimated between 750 and 800. 
The total population of Coalinga and the oil 
field is between 1200 and 1300 inhabitants. 



KERN 



W. B. Robb has gone to San Francisco to as- 
sist President McQuigg of the Independent Oil 
Producers' Agency with various matters pertain- 
ing to the organization. 

The agency is being importuned by individuals 
and companies who want to make contracts for 
oil, but the directors are reluctant to begin mak- 
ing contracts until they have all the companies 
signed up that they expect to get into the or- 
ganization. 

According to well-informed observers the oil 
industry is getting ready for a big roll-over and 
something will be doing within the next few 
weeks. Oil men are watching the Associated 
with almost as much interest as they watch the 
newer combine and there is an impression that. 



by the time the Independents are ready for busi- 
ness there will be a general movemnt all along 
the line. 

The McKittrick Oil Company sent out a new 
seventy horse-power boiler yesterday for use in 
pumping its wells. The company has recently 
put two more wells in trim, making three now 
producing. The estimated output of the three 
wells is 400 barrels per day. — Echo. 

According to the last report of the Associated 
there were 19,500,000 shares of the company's 
stock sold. Of these probably nine-tenths are 
held by the directors and other "inside" inter- 
ests, and it is not likely that any of the stock is 
in the hands of these insiders could be bought 
for 22 cents. At 22 cents the 19,500,000 shares 
of stock would be worth $4,290,000. The As- 
sociated owns in Kern county about 6000 acres 
of the best oil land, which is certainly worth 
$1000 per acre. It owns about 12,000 acres in 
the Santa Maria field near the new 15,000-bar- 
rel well of the Union Oil* Company, and it owns 
the Salt Lake property at Los Angeles, which 
is producing 3000 barrels of 50-cent oil per day. 
All this is in addition to extensive pipe line and 
tank sj'Stems in the Coalinga field and other prop- 
erty which the company has scattered around- in 
different places. 

The Associated is building a pipe line from the 
Salt Lake wells to Los Angeles and it is reported 
that the product of these wells has been sold to 
the Pacific Electric Company at 50 cents. 

In connection with the drop in the quotations 
of Associated it is understood that the Reed 
Crude has just sold 426,000 shares of Associated, 
stock which it held in its treasury at a price be- 
tween 25 and 30 cents, probably nearer the latter 
figure. The value of Reed Crude stock has ad- 
vanced incidentally from $1.60 to $2.10. 

W. F. Chandler of Fresno, who is one of the 
recently elected assemblymen, is the vice-presi- 
dent of the Associated. 

Dr. Liscomb, the secretary of the Independent 
Oil Producers' Agency, reports that everything 
is moving along in a satisfactory manner with 
the new combine. The work at present is the 
bringing in of the few remaining companies that 
have not already signed up. In most of these 
companies there a few stockholders who have not 
given the plans of the agency very much study 
and are therefore not prepared to give their con- 
sent to casting their lot with it. Personal work 
is being done with these reluctant stockhold- 
ers to convince them that the plan of the agency 
is a good one for all concerned. As fast as the 
matter is properly presented to them these stock- 
holders are as a rule giving their sanction to the 
leasing of their companies' properties to the 
agency. 

Among those who are engaged in this campaign 
of education are M. V. McQuigg and Captain 
F. F. Weed, who are in San Francisco, and who 
send encouraging reports of their success. 

W. B. Rob was in Fresno on a similar mission 
and Dr. Liscomb goes to Los Angeles to see a 
number of oil men with whom he is personally 
acquainted. 

Among the local oil stock owners W. D. 
Young, Captain Lucey and C. H. Ritchie have 
been doing excellent work. It is stated now that 
it is practically assured that all the companies 
upon which these men have been working will 
com'', into the agency. 

The agency is making no effort as yet to find 
a market for its oil and although it has been 
approached by large concerns with a view to mak- 
ing contracts the officers have replied that they 
were not yet ready to quote prices or to enter- 
tain propositions. As Dr. Liscomb says, 



PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 



the a 

■ 

already been reported thai 

•M Jllliiu: 

r month. In addition to 
lull a mil 

the !. lie required by the Associated 

and other I getting under way the 

ule hy the Indcpcnd. lly re- 

markable. 

ved that the Recruit Oil 

ick oil at 1600 feet in the Santa 

field. I he well was immediately closed 

dawn and the Recruit people arc not laying much 

about their >tnke, but it is understood that the 

r a tine producer are very flattering. 

pod news to the stockholders of La 

Plata Oil Company, which has a lease on a piece 
of land in the immediate vicinity of the Recruit. 
The La Plata people consider their land is proven 
by the Recruit's new well. 

The Standard in declining to purchase any 
more spot oil is actuated only by motives friendly 
to the Independent Agency, it being the wish 
of the big Combine that the Agency, with which 
it hopes to do business, secure, as far as possible, 
the control of the product of the held. It is 
said on good authority that the Standard is ready 
and willing to purchase from the Agency all the 
oil it controls at a rate of not less than 25 cents 
a barrel, hut in order to do this, it must be rea- 
sonably certain that there is no great amount of 
loose oil that can be thrown upon the market 
at a price less than what the Standard is paying 
the Agency. Hence the declination of the Stan- 
dard to take any more spot oil, the idea being 



DIRECTORS 
M. Groasmayar. 
S. Fleisher. 
J. B. Bonetti. 
T. R. Finley. 
S. A. Johnson. 
C. F. Brimming. 
James Smith. 



OFFICERS. 

M. Grossmayer, Pees. 
S. Fleisher, Vice Pres. 
J. B. Bonetti, Treaa. 
T. R. Finley. Sec'y. 
S. A. Johnson, Gen. Mgr. 



Barca Oil Company 



CAPITAl IZATION, 



10,000; 



/'./A! I .11.1 i: STOCK, $1.00 PER SHARE. 



The property of this Company consists of 250 acres of land, situated one -half mile north 51 
the famous Pucissima well of the Union Oil Company, which has been flowing 500 barrels of oil 
daily for the past year, and it is directly in line between that well and the mpany's 

famous 12,000-barrel gusher on the Hartnell Tract. 

We are offering enough stock in our Company at 2^ cents per share to drill our first well, 
and at this price the stock is the best and safest investment so far offered in the Santa Maria Dis- 
trict, and a sure money-maker for those who invest. 

Our well No. 1 is now drilling and will be pushed to completion as rapidly as possible. 

For further information address 



BARCA OIL COMPANY, 



SANTA MARIA, CAL. 



BULLFROG 



Our General Manager spent several weeks at Tonopah, Goldfield and 
Bullfrog. Tonopah is a great camp; Goldfield is a greater camp, and has 
produced more gold in less time than any gold field ever discovered. 

Bullfrog was discovered by "Shorty" Harris in August. It is an 
enormous outcropping of quartz, 200 feet in width. Assay values on the 
surface have shown values as high as several thousand dollars per ton, and 
is considered the greatest discovery made in recent years. The present own- 
ers declined $100,000 for the property before any work was done. 

Bullfrog lies 70 miles south of Goldfield and is now organized as the 
Bullfrog Mining District. It is the judgment of practical mining men 
that it will prove far greater than the phenomenal fields of Goldfield or 
Tonopah. The discoveries already made in and around the Bullfrog dis- 
covery mine extend seven miles one way by thirteen the other. The Ha- 
zelton strike of a 20- foot ledge of $100 ore, and the Lonsway strike of 
$300 to $8,000 ore, and the Clark, Benson & Ladd properties, on which $1 
per pound ore is being sacked, and the original discovery that is now being 
worked has made tremendous excitement, and there is a wonderful rush to 
Bullfrog. Five town sites are being built up. Several thousand people 
are already on the field and everything is located for miles in every direc- 
tion. 

Around this original discovery, that consists of two claims, we have 
secured two claims on the west, one on the north, two on the east and two 
on the south that joins the discovery know-n as the Original Bullfrog Mine. 
We were offered $50,000 for the property, but declined it. We have in- 
corporated the Bullfrog Extension Mining Company; capitalization $1,000,- 
000; par value $1. The affairs of the Company will be handled by practi- 
cal mining men. 

A contract was let for sinking a shaft on the 100-foot ledge outcropping 
on the property and work started the 29th of November. The high grade 
ore will be sacked and shipments made at an early date. The Company 
does not owe a dollar on the property and has deposited in the Nye & 
Ormsby County Bank of Goldfield the money to pay for the shaft. 

We advise our customers to be exceedingly cautious about buying stock 
in those Companies that offer shares for two or three cents each. Many 
of them have only leases, or options to purchase. Some of them have nothing 
at all. The Bullfrog Mining Company is different. It has the best prop- 



erty in the field ; it does not owe one dollar ; has money in bank to pay for 
the contract already let, and is a first-class proposition in every particular, 
with land values that are exceptionally good, the title to which is perfect. 
Experts have stated that it is equal to anything so far found at Goldfield or 
Bullfrog. 

We are offering a small block of stock at twenty cents per share, half 
cash, the balance in two payments within six months. It looks to us equal 
to anything so far found at Goldfield. We invite investigation and corre- 
spondence. Our stock will go rapidly. 

There are now five town sites at Bullfrog and hundreds of people are 
coming in daily. Property values have enormously increased in thirty 
days. We have an option on and can sell four good claims joining our 
property at $30,000. We have a man on the field and are prepared to 
give up-to-date information. Correspondence solicited. Order a block of 
stock of the Bullfrog Extension Mining Company and you can make no 
mistake. 

AMERICAN DUCHESS OIL COMPANY. 

Stock now selling at ten cents per share. Will advance to twenty cents 
on January 1st. 

The land of the Duchess Company is proven. The management is of 
the best and has been endorsed by a great number of the best oil and mining 
papers. A GOOD PAYING WELL WAS FOUND IN THE FIRST 
SAND, at the depth of 800 feet. The oil was temporarily cut off. They 
are now drilling for the second sand. The well is over 1370 feet deep 
in sandy shale carrying much oil and tremendous gas pressure. THE 
SECOND SAND WILL MEAN A BIG PRODUCTION OF 55 
GRAVITY OIL THAT SELLS AT $3 PER BARREL.. When the 
well is finished we look for the stock to go to $1 or more per 
The Duchess will be our next dividend-payer. Let us tell you about it. 
Write or wire for particulars. You had better wire and have a block of 
stock reserved before the advance to twenty cents January I, 1905. 

DEBENTURE SURETY COMPANY m 

Rialto Building, San Francisco, Cal. 
j Use the Wires. It Pays. 



10 



PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 



to induce all the companies, not yet members 
of the combine, to join and become a part of the 
Agency. 

The Standard will soon have an idle storage 
capacity of 8,000,000 barrels, in the Kern River 
field, a capacity almost equal to the oil it now 
has stored. It wants oil for these empty reser- 
voirs, and the only medium through which it can 
secure it in quantity is through the Independent 
Agency. ,i . 

The Agency is tightening its hold on the pro- 
duct of the field. It is said that several strong 
companies are about to join it, though nothing 
can be ascertained definitely on this point. It is 
certain, however, that the Standard feels like en- 
couraging the Agency and is even now lending 
its influence to strengthening the organization. — 
Calif ornian. 

Among the oil men this morning, a great deal 
of interest was being taken in the departure of 
Secretary Liscomb and Treasurer Robb of the 
Independent Agency for San Francisco. Dr. 
Liscomb and Mr. Robb left this city at a call from 
President McQuigg, to attend a special meeting 
of the executive committee. 

While nothing definite has been given out re- 
garding the special business that is to be taken 
up at this meeting, it is surmised, in view of 
the fact that Dr. Liscomb and Mr. Robb expect 
to remain in San Francisco for a few days, that 
the executive committee has been called to dis- 
cuss the various bids that have been received 
for the purchase.. of the. Independent Agency's 
product. None of the prices that have been of- 
fered for Independent oil have yet been given 
out. A well-known and a very successful oil 
man was heard to remark this morning: "Give 
me 30 cents for oil in Kern county and I will 
make more money than in any other business en- 
terprise in the United States." Another oil man 
was of the opinion that 25 cents a barrel is a 
good price. "I have paid a dividend on Yiy^ 
and 15 cent oil," he said. 

If-the business now before the executive com- 
mittee is the consideration of bids, it is antici- 
pated in oil circles that some important and sat- 
isfactory conclusions will be reached. Any ac- 
tion that will enable the independent producers 
to launch their product at a figure above the 
present market price would be a most acceptable 
Christmas gift after the bitter struggle of the 
past four years. 

In the absence of Dr. Liscomb, W. D. Young 
is filling his position here as secretary. — Call- 
f ornian. 

Petroleum Fuel in the Navy 



Washington, Dec. 12, 1904. 

Secretary of the Navy Morton, in his forth- 
coming, annual report to the President, will take 
a decidedly optimistic view of the possibilities of 
petroleum as a fuel for warships. The Liquid 
Fuel Board in its elaborate report, an abstract of 
which recently appeared- in the Reporter, unre- 
servedly expressed the opinion that fuel oil was 
destined to be used in enormous quantities for the 
propulsion of vessels, but intimated that, the prin- 
cipal field would be in the merchant marine and 
that there were difficulties which might prove 
uhsuperable with regard to the storage and hand- 
uo tunapjjsd jo 'uoqduinsuoD sip sb jpAV se 'Suij 
warships in actual service. Thus; while -the ex- 
periments made by the board were of gYeat value 
to steam users both ashore and afloat,- hevertheT 
less, the general impression left by the report of 
these experts was adverse to the employment of 
liquid fuel on war vessels. Mr. Morton states 
his views briefly, but pointedly, as follows: 

'As the United States produces 48 per cent of 



Flow of Natural Gas 
Increased by . . . 

Cooper's Gas Lift 

Also flow of water 
or oil increased and 
gas saved 

A. S. COOPER, C.E„ 



219 Crocker Building 
San Francisco, Cal. 

AT A BARGAIN. 
Standard Drilling Rig with full equipment of 
small tools. Boiler and engine in first-class con- 
dition. Address Exchange No. 21, care this 
journal. 



WB SELL 

BARLOW & HILL 



, ■■ 



UP-TO- 
DATE . 



M A P S 



WHICH ARE THE ONLY 

RELIABLE NAP PUBLISHED 



Large Blue Prints, . . . . $1,50 L 

Book containing Small Indexed Maps 

of all the California Fields, each 50 

Per Dozen 5.00 

PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 

318 PINE STREET 

San Francisco 

WANTED — Position as Superintendent of -an 
oil company. Thirty years' experience in 
Pennsylvania, Ohio and California. Best of 
reference. Address, 

"PETROLEUM," care this paper. 



We Promote, Finance and Incorporate 

Let us show you the advantages of incorporating your business or enterprise. 
If you need moneyto enlarge your business, permit us to secure it for you, by selling 
stock through our Eastern correspondents. 

CONSOLIDATED AUDITING COMPANY 

307 to 310 Mills Building, San Francisco. - 
Telephone Bush 849. 

WRITE US TO-DAY ! 

If you want to invest your money in a sound business proposition where you are sure 
to receive ten dollars for every one dollar invested 

BUY BUFFALO-CALIFORNIA OIL STOCK. 
This company is incorporated under a special act of Congress providing for the incor- 
poration of companies in the District of Columbia, making our stock absolutely non-assessable 
We hold some of the most valuable oil property in the well known 

HALFMOON BAY DISTRICT, 
San Mateo County, California, 
Now possessing many fine oil wells producing 52° to 55 gravity oil. But we cannot tell it all 
here. Write us for full particulars. 

Correspondence with reliable brokers and agents solicited. 

BUFFALO-CALIFORNIA OIL CO., 
Fletcher Block, 
j Livermore, California. 



C. V. Hall Iron Works 

(LOCATION, OL1NDA, ORANGE CO., CAL.) 

POSTOFFICB ADDRESS, Route No. 2, 
FULLERTON.. CAL. 

Los Angeles Office, 222 Wilcox Building, 
LOS .'NGELES, CAL. 

* 

The C. V. H. Chain Tongs can be had through 
any dealer in oil well supplies. 

These tongs are made of the very best steel, 
in any size, and always give satisfaction. 

Manufacturers or users of chain tongs do so 
at their own risk, in any infringements Of 
Patent No. 438,1T7, the ownership of 
which belongs to the undersigned. 

CHARLES VICTOR MALL. 




PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 



u 



urn, and as the 

rralions, ihc qui ;i«l fuel on 

ihiss ot war. which I rs Ix-en eo- 

.; the attrr 
of peculiar interest to this conn; 

"Oil is used in oal in manufactories 

and power plants on the Pacific C oast, locomo- 
tives on California ra is lucl 
in lieu of coal with satisfactory results, particu- 
larly from the standpoint of economy, a saving 
per cent in fuel cost alone in some 
having been attained. (Venn steamers arc 
plying regularly between Honolulu and San Fran- 
cisco with liquid fuel installations, which appear 
to He sate, satisfactory and economical. Two 
ocean freighters have made voyages from New 
York to San Francisco using coal, and returning 
from San Francisco to New York using oil as 
fuel. With oil better time was made ; the cost 
was less; the trip was made with six men only 
instead of fifteen in the (ireroonis; several hun- 
dred tons more space was available for cargo, 
and there was no increase in insurance rates. The 
total saving to the owners from the use of oil 
was not less than $500 per day. 

"All this does not prove that petroleum can be 
advantageously substituted for coal as a fuel 
supply for naval vessels, but it is sufficient to 
warrant giving it a trial in some of them. 

"Among the advantages offered by liquid fuel 
are the reduction of the complement of men in 
the fireroom, extension of the steamship radius of 
vessels, attainment of maximum speed at short 
notice, the facility with which the boilers may 
be forced to extreme duty in cases of emergency, 
rapidity in meeting a varying load on the boil- 
ers, absence of smoke under light normal working 
conditions, economy of space reserved for carrying 
fuel, and finally the fact that oil tanks may be 
readily and quickly replenished. It appears to 
have been demonstrated by commercial experi- 
ence that steam can be raised by oil fuel in one- 
third the time required by a coal furnace, and 
that the time requisite to fill oil tanks may be re- 
duced to a fraction of that needed for filling 
bunkers with coal. 

"On the other hand, the difficulties of using 
a liquid-fuel plant upon vessels of war, particu- 
larly battleships and cruisers, are many and ob- 
vious. 

"In pursuance of an act of Congress making ap- 
propriation for the purpose, a board of officers has 
been engaged for more than two years in investi- 
gating the feasibility of the use of liquid fuel 
on naval vessels, and during twelve months of this 
period the torpedo boat Rodgers, with its per- 
sonnel, was placed at the disposal of the board. 
The valuable data obtained by the researches thus 
conducted will be found fully set forth in a re- 
port made by the board to the Chief of the Bu- 
reau of Steam Engineering, and just published. 

"In this report the board expresses the opinion 
that 'at least one vessel cruising on the Pacific 



FOR SALE. 



per share, 
ires Brbokshirc i > ,1 pcr 

share. 

W. 1 \RD, 

476 Tenth Street, i i.kl.md. California. 



BARGAIN 

Complete Oil Rig for Sale 



We manufacture the best 
lubricating: oils for oil 
drillers 

KING KEYSTONE OIL CO., 
204 Front St., San Francisco. 



Including two String Tools 
and Fishing Tools 

Over 3000 lect ot catting In good condi- 
tion — some never used — sizes, 1 
i> ■: 8 inch and 8 inch drive pipe 

The Above Property 
Cost Over $10,000 

and is for sale at a bargain 

Exchange No. 22 

Care this Publication 



the: 



KROHN 



WIRE ROPE SOCKET 

THE ONLY SOCKET USING A BALL CLUTCH 



LASTING QUALITIES UNEQUALLED 



PATENT 



CLUTCH 




DEVICE 



Fop Sale by ALL 

OIL WELL SUPPLY HOUSES 



3= 






LLEWELLYN IRON WORKS 

SOLE MANUFACTURERS 

LOS ANGELES, CAL. 



\ 



Write for Circular 




The 

Name 

Determines 

the 

Quality 



FITLER'S 1 Oil Well Supply Co.'s 



DRILLING 

CABLES 



i 

m 



Drilling Tools 
Engines & Supplies 
Pumping Outfits 



7, 



R. H. HERRON CO. 

509 Mission St. - SAN FRANCISCO 



The 

Name 

Determines 

the 

Quality 



PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 



coast should be so arranged as to burn liquid oil 
exclusively;' that there should be no attempt to 
use oil as an auxiliary fuel in this coast-defense 
vessel, but that reliance should be placed 'exclu- 
sively upon the oil product;' that in case an oil 
depot were established at Honolulu, an oil-fuel 
installation should be made in one of the coast- 
defense monitors, 'whereby the advantages and 
disadvantages of oil as a fuel for naval purposes 
could be absolutely ascertained.' The board fur- 
ther states that 'the information and data already 
secured warrants the immediate installation of 
oil-fuel appliances on several torpedo boats and 
torpedo boat destroyers to test the adaptability of 
the water-tube boilers of bent-tube type for using 
this fuel.' 

"My own view with respect to the matter is 
that the use of oil as a fuel on board vessels is 
a question that can not by any means be regarded 
as settled adversely." 

It is probable that in view of Secretary Mor- 
ton's report Congress will grant another appro- 
priation to cover the cost of actual tests of pe- 
troleum as recommended by the Liquid Fuel 
Board. 



Recent Patents 



The following recently granted patents of in- 
terest to the oil and gas trade are reported ex- 
pressly for The Pacific 'Oil Reporter by J. 
M. Nesbit, patent attorney, Park building, Pitts- 
burg, Pa., from whom printed copies may be pro- 
cured for 15 cents each: 

Well-sinking apparatus, M. T. Chapman, Au- 
rora, 111, 775,417. 

Well-jack, W. E. A. Pipher, Parker's Land- 
ing, Pa., 775,733. 

Drill or pump-rod extractors, E. F. Day, 
Rising Sun, Ohio, 776,221. 

Standing valve for oil or artesian well pumps, 
W. S. Beers, Marion, Ind, 776,377. 

Coupling for drills, C. H. Giese, Toronto, 
Kan, 776,391. 

Automatic rope-spear, M.'J. Riggs, Marietta, 
Ohio, 776,425. 

Pipe-grab, F. J. Lukins, Aurora, 111, assignor 
to The American Well Works, 776,523. 

Sucker-rod grab, O. A. Mann, Oil Center, 
Cal, 776,749. 

Gas-pressure regulator, R. J. Hoffman, Brad- 
ford, Pa, 776,839. 



To Drill Soon. 



For a week or two rumors of an oil boom 
for Arroyo Grande have been flying thick and 
fast and apparently the oily bubble has come to 
a head and is ready for a launching. 

For several days past parties from the Kern 
oil fields have been here sizing up the territory 
and on Thursday the directors of the Santa 
Manuela company held a meeting at which a 
representative of the Kern field was' present. It 
was agreed (this is not official) that they would 
pool their interests and the Kern man is to place 
a drilling outfit on the ground forthwith. A 
committee will start out Monday, we are in- 
formed, to secure leases and if it is successful 
we believe the machine will be forthcoming. 

We are also assured that within a few weeks' 
time other parties will be here prepared to talk 
oil in a straightforward business way. 

We have always had a strong conviction that 
oil was here for the drilling and shall gladly 
welcome any one who will seek it in a gentle- 
manly and business way. — Arroyo Grande Her- 
ald. 



FRESNO COUNTY ABSTRACT COMPANY 

Incorporated Under the Laws of California January 21, 1901. 

Capital Stock $100,000.00 

FUL_L_Y PAID UP 

SEARCHERS OF RE CORDS AND CONVEYANCE 

Abstracts of Title Caref ully Compil ed at Reasonable Rates. 

NO. 1115 K ST., FRESNO, CAL. 



SMITH, EMERY ®. CO, 

Chemical Engineers - 




ANALYSES 

PBTROLEUM —= Calorific Valve, 
Fractional Distillation, Refinings, 
Viscosity, Freezing, Candle Power, 
Burning, Etc. Boiler, Feed and Drink- 
ing Water. Umpire Work on Oil Contracts. 

83-85 New Montgomery Street 

SAN FRANCISCO 




ALWAYS FIRST; 



Ever had trouble in getting the size 
of casing or drive pipe you needed? 



TRY I Si 



We can help you. We carry ALL the regular 
sizes and the following specials: 



13^2 
12^ 
10 

9 s /s 

7^8 
6Vs 

5^8 

4^ 

7 

5 

2 

3 



inch Boston " Diamond B" Casing 42 pounds 

34 



• 35 

■ 3oU 
.24^ 
.20 

•17^ 
.17 

• 9 39 



Drive Pipe 23.27 

" 1450 

Tubing 4*4 

" %% 



Don't you think we can suit you ? 



THE NATIONAL SUPPLY COMPANY 

Los Angeles, San Francisco, Bakersfield, 
Mc Kittrick, Coalinga, Santa Maria. 



PACIFIC on 



13 



■ 

TV ». sales in the Califor- 

M.ll SCS- 

the «rck ending 
ccniber 14: 

k — 

25 



st 

Caribou — 

150 shares .it • 

150 shares at I 

Chicago Crude — 

Jo 

shares at 22 

Clarcmont — 

shares at 85 

For'' 

shares at 40 

Four — 

; i»' shares at 56 

600 shares at 57 

2,500 share- at 58 

Hume — 

5,855 shares at 40 

-hares at 41 

-hares at +2 

-hares at 43 

-hares at 44 

Independence — 

500 shares at 31 

8,000 shares at 32 

Monte Cristo — 

350 shares at 771-'. 

Occidental — 

1,300 shares at 08 

Oil City Petroleum — 

500 shares at 64 

1,000 shares at 65 

3,000 shares at 66 

2,000 shares at 67 

1,600 shares at 68 

2,000 shares at 70 

Reed Crude — 

300 shares at 2.10 

Sovereign — 

800 shares at 30 

Following are the latest quotations for stocks 
of oil companies listed on the California Stock 
and Oil Exchange: 

Bid. Asked 

Apollo $ .35 $ .40 

Ass. Oil Co. Stk. Tr. Cer .26 .27 

California-Standard .... .18 ... 

Caribou 5.87% 6.12% 

Central Point Con 70 .... 

Chicago Crude ... .22 

Claremont ... .90 

Coalinga & Pacific .50 

Forty 37 .40 

Four 56 .59 

Fulton 50 1.75 

Giant 22 

Hanford 250.00 

Home 40 

Illinois Crude .70 

Imperial , . 16.50 

Independence .31 

Junction 20 .22 

Kern 5.00 

Kern (New) .30 

Kern River 12.00 

Linda Vista .17 

Lion 

Maricopa ... .10 

McKittrick 10 

Monarch of Arizona. ... . . .30 

Monte Cristo 77 '^ .80 

Nevada County ... .45 

Occidental of W. Va. . . .08 .09 

Oil City Petroleum 67 .68 



WESTERN COOPERAGE CO. 

MANUFACTl'R! K 

STAVES and HEADING 

For Both Tlftht and 6 
OUR SPECIALTIES ARE 

While Spruce Saves and Heading 
all ready to set up lor Fish. 
Pickles or Lard packages 0! 
any size. 



1 ir Tight Barret Staves and 

Heading lor Oil, Lard, Pork, 
Beef, Etc., Etc. 



Fir Slack Barrel Staves and Heading for Asphalt, Lime 
Cement and Bottle Barrels. 

Prompt and Courteous attention to alt Inquiries. 

HILLS at Aberdeen, Wash, and Roulton, Ore. 



I MAP CO 

plete map 

led has jusi 

te map tn. i. 

! fully 
surve; h irefully located. All 
land holdings have bei 

md the map is a line specimen ol thi 
makers' art. It mn are interested in the Coal- 
inga field you should not be without one. Price 
tor lar^c blue-prints, $1.50 each. Order direct 

from the makers or from the PACIFIC < >n Ki 
PORTER, 3IS Pine stnet. San Francisco. 



Lacy Manufacturing Company 



Manufacturers of 




Steel Water Pipe 
General Sheet 
Iron Works 
Oil Well Casing 
Oil Stills 

OIL STORAGE AND WAGON TANKS 

Works: Cor. New Main and Date streets, P. O. Box 231, Station C. 

Baker Block Telephone Main 196 

Office, 334 North Main Street, Los Angeles, Cal. 

BATES' 

PATENT CASINO TONGS 




1416-1426 19th St.. Bakersfield, Cal. 



Fills a long-felt want. No more need of 
pole and rope f >r screwing up casing. Bates 
Tongs can be applied to the casing anywhere 
in driving or pulling without danger of injury 
or parting casing. 

Set No. 1, with any two size jaws from 9$^ 
to 13^ Inches. 

Set No. 2. with any two size jaws fro-n 4 to 
q%/t Inches. 



AIW WATER 




-34 

Peerless .. ...■.; 14.00 

Petroleum Center ... .10 

Piedmont j.Q6 

Reed Crude 2.05 

S. F. & McKittrick "3.00 

Section Seven ..; .1.00 1 

Sovereign ■ '...' .31 .33 

Sterling^...... 2.00 -2.05 

Superior .04 ... 

Teck ...<:,,.... ... :■ 1:15 

Thirtv-three 6.00 8.25 

Toltec' . ...... ....... .23 

-Twenty-eight ,-■-•••• 12.50 

Union ..' 70. M;.- 

United ■ Petroleum ..... . . . A QQ.-Q0 

West'- "Shore 1 ."50 ... 

Wolverine . . ..„ > .50 

=\ ' .'"•■ ■■.-.. ', 

NOTES. cbK ' 



. As a. result,. of Mr.- J..E. Kerr's .recent trip to 
the- Bullfrog mining camp, articles of incorpora- 
tion were, filed this week naming the Bullfrog 
Extension Mining Company. The company is 
said to have excellent holdings adjoining the orig- 
inal Bullfrog discovery claim. 

The Caribou Oil Company has declared a 
dividend of 7 cents per share on the capital stock 
of the company, amounting ifo ■ $5600, payable- 
December 15. , . . 

The California Stock and Oil Exchange will 
adjourn from the close of business Friday, De- 
cember 23, to Tuesday morning, December 27, 
at 10:30 o'clock. 

Apollo. Oil Company will pay its first dividend 
of 1 cent per share on the capital stock of the 
company, 'amounting to $2000, on December 20.- 
, : The Four Oil Company will pay a dividend of 
% cents per. share, against 1 cent, amountingto • 
$6000, on December 15. ' 

:. The big Union Oil Company's tank in the. 
Athletic park, Santa Barbara, is nearing com- 
pletion. The steel sides are all up and riveted, 
and the steel girder will soon be run around the 
top, and" then the wooden roof will be put on. 
The tank will then he ready for the pipe line 
connecting it with the Potter hotel and the -Edi- 
son .Company's power house. These pipes are 
now on the ground and. the work of laying them 
will be put through in a few days. 

The. Kern river oil field is said to be shipping 
out 200 cars of oil daily, about 1,200,000 bar- 
rels monthly. 

The Globe Oil Company haS been purchased 
by the Alcedeo Oil Company v of which Dr. A. 
H. Liscomb, secretary of .the Independent Oil 
Producers Agency, is organizer and manager. 

It is said that the production of the Cpajinga 
oil field for the year 1904 will be from 4,500,000 
to 5,000,000 barrels, just about double that of 
the preceding year. This is now the busiest field 
in the State in' point of development work, there 
being about forty strings of tools at work. . 

Dr. W. G. Freeman, formerly a Santa Fe 
surgeon, was in the Kern river fields recently 
discussing with the superintendents a project to 
start a hospital in that field for the care of the 
employes of the several oil companies. The plan. 
is similar to that in effect on the different rail- 
roads and is to-.tax each- employe $1 per month 
for the support of the hospital. 

In addition to the care of the men in case of 
accident the ' physician in charge would probably 
look after the general health of the employes 
and their families. 

Tbfi .Wkstcrn- -Union iftnd Union gushers , at 
Santa Maria are keeping up to their regular daily 
stunt of --3000 arid. 12,50t> barrels, respectively. 
The greatest difficulty is in obtaining sufficient 
storage, earthen reservoirs being constructed in 
lieti thereof. 



PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 



PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 

is the only 

OIL JOURNAL 

Published on the 

Pacific Coast. 

If gives full, fresh and authentic oil news from 
all the oil districts, new and old. It exposes 
fraudulent oil companies; It gives the latest 
information on oil stocks and dividends. It 
describes the latest method of drilling wells, 
pumping, piping and storing oil; use of oil for 
road making, etc. 

It is the only paper which advocates the belief 

that California's refined asphalt is the equal 

*"."' of Trinidad asphalt for paving and other pur- 

poses, and is in every way superior to bitumi- 
nous rock, the use of which has given San 
Francisco, Oakland and other California cities 
so many- poor streets. 

The subscription price is $2.50 a year. If you 
are Interested in any way in California oil, cut 
out the following coupon, fill in- the blank lines, 
and send it, accompanied by check, money 
or express order to the 

PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 

318 Pine St. San Francisco 



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Pacific Oil Reporter 

318 Pine Street San Francisco. 

Please enter my subscription to the PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 

_ . . 1± — , , at $ 



Signed- 



Address— 



Date- 



PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 



Vol. 6. No. 8 



San Francisco, Cal., Saturday, Dec. 24, 1904 



Price Ten Cents 



PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 

Published Weekly. 

Thr Oil Authority of the Pacific Coast. 
Endorsed by California Petroleum Miners' Ass'lt. 

M\ri\ R. WlNN, Proprietor. 
1 M IN . Editor anil Man i 



OFFICE \M> BOrrORIAL ROOMS 

118 Pine Street - - San Francisco, California 

Telephone, Bush 176. 



TERMS. 

One Year $2.50 

Si\ Months 1.50 

Three Months .-. . 1.00 

Single Copies 10 

STRICTLY IN ADVANCE. 



Money should be sent by Postal Order, Draft 
or Registered Letter, addressed to Pacific Oil 
Reporter. 318 Pine Street, San Francisco, rooms 
31-32-33. Communications must be accompanied 
by writer's name and address, not necessarily for 
publication, but as a guarantee of good faith. 

Entered in the Postoffice at San Francisco, Cal- 
ifornia, as second class matter. 

Latest Quotations 

The prices offered by the Pacific Coast Oil 
Company for spot California crude oil at the 
wells are as follows: 



COALINGA. 



Gravity at 60 deg. temperature. 
Oil of 22 deg., up to, but not including 24 



Price 
per barrel 



Oil of 24 deg., up to, but not 
Oil of 25 deg., up to, but not 



ncluding 25 . 
ncluding 26. 



.20 
.30 
.35 
.40 
.45 
.50 
.55 



Oil of 26 deg., up to, but not including 27. . 
Oil of 27 deg., up to, but not including 28. . 
Oil of 28 deg., up to, but not including 29. . 
Oil of 29 deg., up to, but not including 3D. . 

The Associated Oil Company is offering 17 1 /; 
cents for fuel oil, 

SANTA MARIA. 

Gravity at 60 deg. Price per barrel 

Temperature. at Port Harford. 

25 deg., up to, but not including 26 $0.50 

26 deg., up to, but not including 27 55 

27 deg., up to, but not including 28 60 

28 deg., up to, but not including 29 65 

29 deg., up to, but not including 30 70 

30 deg., up to, but not including 31 75 

31 deg., up to, but not including 32 80 

32 deg. and up 85 

KERN RIVER. 

Price subject to contract. Few offers at less 
than 25 cents. Greater part of independent pro- 
duct held for better prices. 

EASTERN QUOTATION'S. 

Pennsylvania $1 .60 

Tiona 1 • 75 

Corning 1.37 

New Castle 1.47 

North Lima 1-07 

South Lima 1 .02 

Indiana 1.01 

Somerset 1.01 

Ragland 60 

Petrolea (Ont.) 1.53 

KANSAS-INDIAN TERRITORY. 

Oil of 32 degrees gravity $0.87 

Oil of 31 '/, degrees gravity 82 

Oil of 31 degrees gravity 77 

(Oil of 30' v. degrees gravity 72 

Oil of 30 degrees gravity 67 

Oil of 29% degrees gravity 62 

Oil of 29 degrees gravity 57 

Oil of 28 ' L . degrees gravity 52 

Oil of 2S degrees gravity 47 



Thomas W. lAwson, the Boston spt 
giving the financial world a shaking up such 
■s it has not experienced in man) a year, and all 
to what purpose? Even the most credulous do 

not tor a Dion cut believe that Tom has met with 
a change of heart or repented of an) of his past 

deed; good or bad. He is playing a game in 

which his long experience and inside knowledge 
of the affairs in Wall street an- standing him 
well in hand. How much he has made or how 
much he expects to make out of his sensational 
charges against Amalgamated Copper is inercK 
a matter of conjecture, hut no one believes he is 
making a light against capital to free a long- 
oppressed and suffering public as he would like 
to have them believe. Lawson is working the 
market to further his own interests; his own 
financial interests, and he will doubtless make a 
few millions before he is checked in his course 
and the unwarry public opens its eyes to see that 
it has been humbugged again. It may even find 
that Lawson is working hand in hand with 
Amalgamated Copper, for it is freely admitted 
that the Rogers interests is buying up, at rock 
bottom prices, whatever stock can be secured 
in the several copper companies that suffered by 
reason of the Lawson attacks upon them. It is 
simply a new method of fleecing the small share- 
holders. 



Why is it that the majority of oil companies 
in California so grossly exaggerate the amount 
of their production? What do they attain by 
doing it. and what is the condition of affairs 
brought about by it? If a person should set 
about taking a census of the production of the 
California fields under existing conditions and 
rely on what was told him by the majority of 
companies. he would reach a figure at least double 
the present production of the State. We suppose 
that these companies wish to make as healthy a 
showing as possible to their stockholders, or, per- 
haps, they wish to keep quotations up on 'change, 
but we believe that the ill effects of this almost 
unanimous tendency to exaggerate the production 
is greater than generally supposed. First of all 
it is almost impossible to arrive at any nearly 
correct figures of the general production of a 
field which, in turn, makes it impossible for one 
to know whether or not the production of the 
State is greater or less than the consumption. 
Under these conditions it is hard for one to 
know the truth of the oil industry. We have 
always had the greatest difficulty in getting ab- 
solutely reliable statistics of the production of the 
State. If for any reason we wish to know the 
production of any particular property we have 
no trouble in getting it; a wooden Indian could 
do that, but we cannot go to each property every 
month, and the result is that so far as the indi- 
vidual producer is concerned he gains nothing, 
while the industry as a whole suffers greatly 
from it. The production of the Eastern fields 
is known every day and every month almost to 
a barrel, and development, prices, etc., are greatly 
governed by it to the advantage of all. Of course 
we realize that conditions are different, but that 
doesn't justify a man in saying he is getting 
1,000 barrels a day from a well that is produc- 
ing 100 barrels. Then, too, ft injures a man's 
reputation for veracity. 



INDEPENDENTS WIN 

Just as we are going to press this (Thursday) 
evening we are permitted to announce that the In- 
dependent Oil Producers Agency, through the 
agency of the Associated Oil Company, has made 
arrangements for the disposition of the entire in- 
dependent product of the Kem oil fields controlled 
by the Agency. The price for which the product 
has been contracted has not yet been made public 
but is believed to be twenty-five cents per barrel. 
The success of the agency in thus disposing of its 
product at a price that will permit the profitable 
1 umping of the wells comes as the crowning glory 
of its heroic efforts for the past five months. It 
has done good work and is to be congratulated on 
its signal success. Its few months of strenuous 
labor along a sane and upright policy has accom- 
plished what could not have been hoped in years 
of frenzied strife and petty competition. The In- 
dependent Producers Agency has our hearty con- 
gratulations. 



Since the S. S. "Sonoma" left there has been 
but two arrivals of Australian coal from New- 
castle, N. S. W., viz.: "Canrobert," 2446 tons; 
"Andromeda," 1,856 tons; total, 4,302 tons. The 
liberal arrivals during last month have fully sup- 
plied the market for all immediate requirements 
of Australian coals, still the quantity on hand 
should be largely consumed by January next. 
There are at present chartered to load at New- 
castle with coal, sixteen vessels with a carrying 
capacity of 40,000 tons, a large portion of this 
amount will not be delivered here for four 
months to come. As soon as our rainfall com- 
mences, the demand for all the Australian grades 
now in market will be very generous, and stocks 
will be freely eaten into; selling prices are steady, 
and there is no probability that any reduction will 
be made before next summer. The present rates 
of freight on coal from Newcastle are very firm, 
with no probability of any marked reduction for 
several months to come ; the demand for steam 
coal is almost entirely supplied by fuel oil which 
is being freely produced at very low prices to 
the consumers. The total amount of Australian 
coal received here this year, is about one-half the 
quantity which was delivered here in 1903, this 
will show demonstratively the falling off of con- 
sumption of Colonial fuel, this is mainly to be 
attributed to the free shipments of British Co- 
lumbia products which are very popular in this 
market, and leaves a generous profit to the im- 
porters. 



The Christmas number of the Santa Maria 
Times is at hand and is a beauty from both the 
artistic and journalistic point of view. In cov- 
ering the various industries of the Santa Maria 
valley it has devoted a full page to the oil in- 
dustry of the county, which has grown by leaps 
and bounds during the year until it stands at the 
head of the industries of the Santa Maria val- 
ley and ranks among the foremost oil producing 
fields of the State. The Times has covered the 
industry in a very creditable manner. 



PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 






Natural Gas in California 

OP Eli, M. E. j& j& 



;& j& By A. S. CO 



% 
% 



-XII. 



LOS ANGELES GAS FIELDS. 
To thoroughly understand this paper the pre- 
ceding articles should be read. 

The area of territory that yields gas in the 
vicinity of Los Angeles is forty miles long and 
thirty miles wide, or one thousand two hundred 
square miles. The following described shallow 
wells and many other wells scattered through- 
cut . this area have proved that nearly all this 
territory will yield water with gas in solution. 

At La Brea well, six miles west of Los An- 
geles, at 1000' feet the well flowed salt water 
arid there was much gas. 

In the' Mesa land in wells sunk for water on 
the Hellmari rancho near the crossroads south of 
Rapetto Hills, inflammable gas was struck in 
sufficient quantity to be. utilized for fuel and 
light. These wells are less than 200 feet deep. 
It is said that the formation penetrated is prin- 
cipally clay and clay shale. 

Between the rancHo La Brea and the hills ly- 
ing' south of the rancho La Cienega a number of 
wells have been sunk, ranging from 80 to 200 
feet in depth. Sulphur water and gas have been 
found. 

In the Union Oil ' Company's well, 900 feet 
deep, in the southeast corner of First and Alva- 
rado streets, at 520 feet there was a particularly 
strong flow of gas and water. 

At Fairview, Orange county, is a well 347 feet 
deep. During the first 100 feet a light sandy 
formation mixed with more or less gravel was 
passed through. Then 40 feet of clay was en- 
countered, after which came sand in which in- 
flammable gas was obtained. A zinc gas holder 
has been placed over the well and the gas con- 
ducted in pipes to the office of the Fairview 
Development Co., where it is used for lighting 
and heating purposes. Gas has also been struck 
one mile west of Fairview and has been used 
for lighting and heating. 

In Chino well, No. 2, which was drilled in 
1897, in section 3, T. 2 S., R. 8 W., S. B. 
Meridian and Base, there was water and much 
gas at 310 feet. 

The Marius well is one and one-half miles 
north of, Santa Fe Springs. The formation is 
gravel and pebbles to 80 feet, clay and sand to 
310. .feet. When completed this well threw a 
column of gas, water and stones to a height of 
300 feet about the casing. 

There are a number of surface gas exhalations 
in Orange • and Los Angeles counties, especially 
at Newport Bay. 

'Rosecrans wells in section 18 and 19, T. 3 
S.. R. 13 W., S. B. M. and Base. Gas well 
No. 1 was sunk fourteen years ago for water. 
Formation was sand and gravel to 100 feet 
(water at 40 feet), shale to 115 feet (water .un- 
der, shale), and back, sand to 135 feet. Gas 
under high pressure was struck beneath the shale 
and the water standing forty feet below the 
top. of, the casing was constantly agitated.. The 
gas continues to force its way through 60 feet 
of water. This gas is used for lighting and 
cooking in a house on the Rosecrans. tract. 

Well No. 2, a short distance northwest of No. 
1 , is 90 feet deep, in. formation similar to that 
of No. 1. From this well, in which the shale 



was not penetrated, a small amount of gas has 
escaped for more than nine years. 

More than ten years ago about one and .one- 
half miles southeast of the Rosecrans wells on the 
Duncan property in the Hayward tract a well 
was drilled for artesian water._ Gas collects in 
this well and has been used for fuel for many 
years. 

If these wells which contain water with gas in 
solution were operated by Cooper's gas-lift they 
could be caused to yield a large amount of water 
and gas. The gas could be used to operate the 
gas lift and for other purposes and the water 
when not mineralized could be used for irriga- 
tion. There is sufficient subterranean water to 
irrigate nearly all this land if it was raised to 
the surface, the supply of water being constantly 
replenished by meteoric water entering the for- 
mation at the outcropping of the different strata. 
The supply of gas being constantly renewed by 
the ascent cf gas through the fissures and cracks 
made by faulting and subsidence. 

Wells drilled to a depth of 3000 to nearly 
4000. feet show that there is a great thickness of 
unaltered strata. Wells drilled to a great depth 
yield free gas under high pressure. Many millions 
of cubic feet of natural gas coming from the oil 
wells are permitted to run to waste. 

There are three prominent fissured and faulted 
anticlinal uplifts in the Los Angeles gas field, 
Puente, Cerritos and San Pedro. The position 
and extent of these uplifts are described below. 
There are probably other uplifts. 

The strike of the San Pedro fissured and fault- 
ed uplift is northwest, extending from Point Fer- 
min to Malaga Cove, about ten miles in length. 
This uplift consists of high hills with a lake near 
their summit, the lake being a subsidence. 

The Cerritos (small hills) uplift is shown 
near Newport Bay; from this point the' strike of 
the fissured and faulted uplift runs towards the 
northwest, passing through the hill called La 
Mesa, thence through Las Bolsas (the pockets), 
Bolsa Chica (little pocket), Landing Hill, north- 
east of Nigger Slough, southwest of Hayward 
Summit; thence through Inglewood, Palms and 
into the ranch San Jose de Buenos Ayres, near 
the National Soldiers' Home, a distance of forty- 
five miles. Within and on each side of the low 
hills forming this uplift are a large number of 
lakes, the beds of which are subsidences. These 
uplifts form an anticline; the northeast side of 
these faulted anticlines have been lifted to a 
higher elevation than the southwest. 

The Puente uplift is a faulted and fissured 
anticline and probably extends from . northwest 
of the City of Los Angeles in a southeasternly di- 
rection, passing through the oil fields of Los An- 
geles south of the Rapetto Hills and through the 
Whittier, Puente and Fullerton Oil .Fields, south- 
west, of Corona, through Elsinore Lake, and from 
Elsinore Lake still continues further to the 
southeast. Between the Puente uplift and the 
Cerritos uplift are a number of small lakes; the 
depressions in which these lakes occur are made 
by the subsidence of the earth. 

The fissures opened by the faulting of the an- 
ticlines and the fissures opened by the subsidences 
have created avenues for the ascent of free natural 
gas or gas in ' solution with water from great 
depths. The natural gas being generated by the 



distillation of carbonaceous or bituminous mat- 
ter by metamorphic heat or formed by the de- 
composition of carbonaceous or bituminous ma- 
terial. 

If wells were located and drilled so as to in- 
tercept these fissures near the apex of the anti- 
clines and artificially cause to flow a large quan- 
tity of water and much natural gas could be ob- 
tained. 

The Los Angeles gas field is more densely pop- 
ulated than any other portion of California of 
an equal era. Large quantities of natural gas will 
be used for domestic purposes, heating, cooking 
and lighting. 

The Los Angeles gas field embraces an area of 
thirty-three billion seven hundred and ninety- 
two million (33,792,000,000) square feet. It is 
safe to assume that in the first thirty-five hundred 
feet there are eight hundred feet of porous strata 
that contains water with gas in solution. Con- 
sequently there are in the Los Angeles gas field 
above the depth of thirty-five hundred feet twen- 
ty-seven trillion, one hundred and thirty-three 
billion, six hundred million (27,133,600,000,000) 
cubic feet of porous strata saturated with water 
carrying natural gas in solution. 

It can be consistently estimated that each cubic 
foot of porous strata contains fifteen per cent of 
water, making four trillion, seventy billion and 
forty million (4.070,040,000,000) cubic feet of 
water. 

From the production of wells yielding water 
with gas in solution it is safe to estimate that 
each two cubic feet of water contains one cubic 
foot of natural gas in solution. Therefore the 
Los Angeles gas field to the depth of thirty-five 
hundred feet must contain two trillion, thirty-five 
billion and twenty million (2,035,020,000,000) 
cubic feet of gas. 

If forty million (40,000,000) cubic feet, of gas 
were used daily, making fourteen billion, six 
hundred million (14,600,000,000) cubic feet an- 
nually, the amount of gas stored in the first 
thirty-five hundred feet below the surface would 
last over one hundred and forty years. 

Add to this the amount of gas being generated 
at the present time, and that obtained from water 
brought upward from a depth exceeding thirty- 
five hundred feet by hydrostatic pressure, the 
supply of natural gas will last for many years. 



The Eastern Petroleum 
Fields in November 



Field work in the northern petroleum produc- 
ing States during the month of November show- 
ed a decrease in the number of wells completed 
and in the amount of new production as compared 
with the results of operations during the month 
preceding. There were various contributing 
causes. The results had not been over satisfac- 
tory during preceding months and there was con- 
sequently less disposition to push drilling opera- 
tions while the scarcity of water, due to the pro- 
-tracted drought, prevented the active search for 
oil in some sections, in fact work was suspended 
on many undertakings, and pumps were idle for 
the want of water to supply the boilers of the 
engines. There is also a growing scarcity of 
available territory which may be regarded as giv- 
ing fair promise of being productive, and conse- 
quently the amount of new work may be expected 
to show further decrease hereafter, although op- 
erations may be stimulated to extra exertions by 
exceptionally good strikes or higher prices. Dur- 
ing the past month several large producers re- 
warded the drillers in the new pool west of 
Mannington, W. Va., and this gave an impetus 



PACIFIC Dl I. Kl 



;»rir>tr- 

11 th<- 

to about I 5(U barn- The 

field • 'he month, tmlt whole, 

'her tc.itn ent to the 

drillers. While there has Seen a decrease in the 
number of failures to find oil, anil a decrease in 

rk in the Eastern petroleum produc- 
ductiot November wells has been smaller, 

falling a full barrel per well below the average 

wells. The ■ 
daily production at thi the month being 

only ten and <■■■. barrels. While drill 

ing operations in the vicinity of the new pool in 
rive, in other sections 
there has been a notable falling off. and especially 
in Ohio and Indiana there is a considerable dc- 
in the amount of new development work 
under way. As weather conditions during the 
ne\r few months arc apt to be unfavorable its is 
probable that work in the fields will be further 
restricted and the new production show further 
decrease. 

The total number of wells completed during 
the month of November in the States of Pen- 
nsylvania. New York. West VIriginia, Ohio and 
Indiana was 1,409, showing a decrease of ninety- 
one, as compared with the number completed 
during October. The decrease was entirely in 
the States producing the lower grades of oil, 
there being an increase in West Virginia. The 
daily production of these wells at the close of the 
month was 15,325 barrels, showing a decrease of 
J ; 4 barrels. There was an increase in the pro- 
duction of the high grades. Of the total number 
of wells completed 253 proved to be unproduc- 
tive, showing a decrease of seventy-two, and the 
percentage of failures to find oil was consequently 
smaller. The average daily production of the 
November wells was only ten and seven-eighths 
barrels, and is the smallest since last May. The 
number of wells drilling at the close of the month 
was 1 1 58, showing a decrease of seventy-one. 
The number of rigs in course of erection was 
527. which shows a decrease of forty-four, mak- 
ing the total decrease of new work under way of 
115 wells. 

following is a tabulated statement of the pro- 
gress in development work in the Eastern fields 
since the opening of the present year: 

COMPLETED WORK. 

Wells New 
Completed. Production. 

January 1,165 12,486 

February 952 11,336 

March 1,133 12.029 

April 1,248 13.008 

May 1,377 13,873 

June 1,687 18,380 

July 1,606 18,971 

August 1,673 20,896 

September 1,593 18,799 

October 1,500 17,829 

November 1 ,'409 15,325 

NEW WORK UNDER WAY. 

Wells Rigs 

drilling, building. Total. 

fanuary 1,365 700 2,065 

Februarv 1,380 715 2,095 

March 1,300 676 1,976 

April 1,322 674 1,996 

Mav 1,387 680 2,069 

rune 1,453 712 2,165 

July. 1,488 606 2,094 

August 1,382 58I 1,963 

September 1,333 489 1,822 

October 1,229 571 1,800 

November 1,158 527 1,685 



The Farmer Get the Plum 



The ■ md is 

I 

in the beginning and thi hth of 

all the oil produced on ,, ( |,.. 

wells last. And he ,!■ sation 

or promise money. The Standard Oil Company. 
in making its settlements, alwa it the 

r's share, pays him and then settles with 
the producer. 

There are many farmers in Allen. Neosho, 
Montgomery, Chautauqua and other count 

Kansas who are making as much our of rheir roj 
alties as a bank president. The Herrick farm, 
east of Chanute, brought its owner $10,000 as 
lease money, and in two yean has paid him more 
than $20,000 in royalties. The Russell farm, 
north of Chanute, 2' II I acres in size, pays the 
farmer $5000 a year, t<> say nothing of the 

inal $3000. The Stewart eight) acres pa] 

a year; the Lockhart forty acres pay more than 
$4000 a \car and brought $5000 to begin with. 
The Barker eight) acres pay $8000 a year; the 
Rosenthal 160 acres pay $7000; the Bloomheatt 
eighty acres pay $5000; the Beach eighty acres 
pa) $301111; the Martin-Aldrich 160 acres pay 
more than $10,000 a year. 

Further south, in Montgomery county, 
where the wells are larger, the royalties are in 
proportion. Around the Bolton pool in this 
county there are farmers making more than 
$10,000 a year easily. The Banks 160 acres pay 
$15,000; the Schoenberg forty acres pay $10,000; 
the Bailey eighty acres pay $8000, and the Shaw 
eighty acres pay $10,000. In Peru, Chautauqua 
county, there are two farms which have paid for 
themselves many times over. Both the Hoffman 
and Spurlock farms of less than 300 acres each 
have been paying at the rate of $2000 a month 
since drilling- began on them. In Coffeyville in 
Montgomery county, the Parent farm has been 
bringing, in from $500 to $1000 a month. And 
in all of these counties there are smaller farms 
which are earning from $100 to $200 a month 
with regularity. There are many of these in the 
northern end of the field at Chanute and P.aola 
and Humboldt and some around Coffeyville. 
There are also a number of these smaller earning 
farms in Wilson county. 

Among the biggest royalty earners in the whole 
field are the Osage Indians. The Osage nation 
eight years ago leased the mineral rights of their 
entire reservation to a New York syndicate of 
which Edwin Foster is president, for one-tenth of 
all the oil and $50 a year for every gas well. 
The New York people sub-leased the eastern end 
of the reservation and drilling has been going 
on there for the last eighteen months. Some 
of the very biggest wells found in the entire field 
are at Ramona in the Osage nation, and they 
all make business for the Indian. As is well 
known, the Osage nation is the richest body of 
men in the United States, their average wealth 
running $2000 per capita. Now their oil roy- 
alties average more than $50,000 a month. This 
makes a total yearly income for the Osages on 
oil alone of $600,000. 

The Cherokees were less fortunate than the 
Osages. They had agreed to lease thousands 
of acres to various persons, but only one of the 
leases, that of the Cudahy's, for the townsitc 
of Bartlesville, was approved, when the Dela- 
wares began suit against the Cherokees, lying 
up all the land until the United States Supreme 
Court passes on the titles. But still the town- 
site at Bartlesville is one of the most productive 
oil districts in the field and it brings in a yearly 
royalty of one-quarter million dollars. Tht 
Creeks have leased their land in severalty at 



in, I tb 



1 



Exports from Eastern 
Ports 



rh in 
Nov., 

1 ( iallons) 

Baltic ore 

Boston and Chi 

tow n 

Delaware 4,985,513 

New York . . . : 

Philadelphia 1,515,339 

Galveston 1.213.130 






56,14 
768 

17. -i 
14,49^383 



Total . 




1,139 

514 
538;050 

342,441 


89,017,955 

127/MI 

8.270,820 

10,000,287 


Roston and 


Charles- 


New link . 




Philadelphia 










Total .. 


881,005 

4,214.702 

40,549 

H.olo.SJO 
.20,700.035 


18.400,287 
34.272.271 

■ 306,449 

760,42ii 

4iil,i,.vi.uo" 

239,740,534 

18 2J4 462 


Illuminating— 


Boston and 


Charles- 






New York . 
Philadelphia 













Total 65,573,016 

Lubricating mid Paraffins — 

Baltimore 270,102 

Boston and Charles- 
town 8,482 

Delaware 

New York 5,215.848 

Philadelphia 2,885,258 

Galveston 3,164 



Total 9,382,854 

Residuum — 

Baltimore 

Boston and Charles- 
town 

Delaware 

New York 890,400 

Philadelphia 4,711,064 

Galveston 



Total 5,601,464 

Total Mineral Oils. 

Baltimore 4,484,801 

Boston and Charles- 
town 49,031 

Delaware 4,986,027 

New York 42, 201,128 

Philadelphia 56,105,037 

Galveston 1,216,303 



694,942,151 

1,085,058 

U3,5r,7 

24,45' 1 

55,644,085 

20,935,1'B2 

28,033 

78,731,864 



540, 

8,857,014 

■14,977,4hO 

7,52x128 

31,899,920 

>,2v< y 

1 1' >0,304 

57,06.1,721 

475,174,226 
303,270,441 
40,26 



Total 89,152,330 912,9 



Technical Questions in 
Deep Drilling 



'.. FAUCK. 

Last year at the international convention ot 
technical drillers in Hannover questions very im- 
portant for technical deep drilling were discrj 
many of which should be furthei deliberated "upon 
in the present meeting. 

In the meanwhile, one of these questions has 



PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 



attained significance . in Germany, for petroleum 
drilling has become so extensive here that the 
control of obtaining earth oil must be given over 
to the mountain authorities. 

From the society's organ of August 1, 1904, 
I observe that here, as in Galicia, essentially dif- 
ferent decrees were proposed in regard to the 
directions of the mountain police,' which appear 
to be adapted to the difference irt the quantity of 
the oil secured, for, if one should establish the 
large Galician fountain wells only ten meters 
apart, then it could easily happen that at great 
depths of 1000 meters the wells would drain 
from one another. Formerly in Galicia the drill- 
ings were not placed nearer together than thirty 
meters. This distance is now increased to forty 
meters in consequence of the great danger to the 
workmen. Since the production of earth oil is 
under the control of the mountain authorities 
the question of the rights of opening mines must 
be mentioned. What would happen if the drill- 
ings were not kept in accordance with the pre- 
viously described regulations regarding separa- 
tion? The precise point of production is below 
and this production relates to subterranean space. 
In Galicia judicious alterations relative to the 
drilling regulations were prescribed. In the com- 
mission appointed by the Austrian agricultural 
ministry for the examination of the management 
situation at the Galician earth oil wells it was 
found that various arrangements of the Cana- 
dian drilling were in existence, especially the 
movable drilling bank and the Canadian remis- 
sion contrivance were rejected. Instead of the 
latter the remission contrivance which I used 
twenty years ago was prescribed as the most suit- 
able of those introduced within two years. The 
causes of this prohibition were the numerous 
serious accidents with the mentioned Canadian 
contrivances. ,.- ! 

In Vienna, in former times, we have also dis- 
cussed the question as to whether a more loose 
pulley would burden the boring tower less than 
the direct pulley over the wheel of the drilling 
tower, and since then it has been shown that 
many of those present assumed that the drilling 
tower was equally burdened in both cases, for in 
the union's organ the sentence from the report 
made in print by Engineer Fauck concerning this 
was entirely omitted because the editor had re- 
ceived the impression from the discussion that I 
had also been mistaken in the representation of 
this assertion. This, however, was not the case. 
This question concerning the raising of heavy 
weights in the drilling tower is very worthy of 
consideration. If, for example, one raises a 
heavy section of pipe, weighing 24,000 kg., above 
the ordinary tower pulley then the tower will 
be burdened with the weight of this load of 
24,000 kg., and the strength of the pull which 
must, in any case, amount to 24,000 kg., together, 
therefore, 48,000 kg. But if a pulley with eight 
wheels is employed for raising this same load then 
the tower will be burdened with this load of 
24,000 kg., and the strength of the pull on the 
line, which is necessary for raising, in this 
24,000 

case: equals 3,000 kg., together 27,000 

8 
kg. In this, therefore, it is not loaded with 48,- 

000 kg., but with only 27,000 kg., that is, with 
21,000 kg. less. A tower with an eight wheel 
pulley which possesses a lifting capacity of 27,000 
kg. may sustain a load of 24,000 kg. without 
breaking down these pulleys. The employment of 
the pulley is therefore of great importance in re- 
gard to the question of the safety of the workmen 
at the tower. 

The deductions I made last year concerning 
the foundation were also misunderstood by some. 

1 have not alluded to patent rights, but only to 



the first formation of an idea, for the first thought 
is the impulse for advancement. Thus, for exam- 
ple, Engineer Wolski was the first to think of 
utilizing the Archimedes screw for purposes of 
deep drilling. Originator's rights belong to him 
alone in this case, for he has pointed out the new 
way and, consequently, improvements are more 
easy to make. 

I was ithe" first to introduce the screw auger for 
loosening the drilling poles, well known to all 
technical drillers. The patent expired a long 
time ago and now for the first time in twenty 
years this contrivance is prescribed in the Gali- 
cian petroleum drillings as necessary and obliga- 
tory for the safety of the workmen. It is worthy 
of remark that the balance wheel formerly em- 
ployed by the Canadians was also used on the 
railway dump heaps. Four years ago I saw such 
a contrivance at the Paskauer railway station, but 
there this contrivance had a severe accident to 
the watchman as a result. Now we see only the 
entirely dangerous screw augers at the railway 
dump heaps. 

Furthermore, I was the first to introduce the 
very' small lift, the automatic jarring core re- 
covery, the enlargement drill with inner pressure 
mechanism and the lever rebounding on the winch. 
I have employed all these constructions and many 
others with successful results and have also ob- 
tained patents for them. Likewise, Engineers 
Koebrich, Lapp, Thumann, Raky and others have 
constructed original innovations which have 
proved to be very satisfactory. 

In last year's convention the possibility of 
an accurate core marking was greatly questioned. 
Here I exhibit a very hard stone core which shows 
a deep mark which could be cut only by a great 
number of blows, all the blows striking in the 
same cut. There is a satisfactory argument, 
therefore, so that the assumption, that the mark 
could have been made with a single blow of the 
chisel was an error and my opinion, namely, that 
Koebrick's method of previously marking the sill 
of the well would be better, should be considered. 
The employment of the strata meter in previ- 
ously marking the firm sill of the well when the 
upper surface of the core is to be drilled war- 
rants, in any case, a greater safety than the later 
methods without marking the sill of the well. 

As regards the question of the most judicious 
connection of the safety pipes I remain true to 
my former opinion that an entirely safe connec- 
tion is obtainable through muff pipes because the 
working of the muff as a pipe end can easily be 
proved inexact and a single defective pipe connec- 
tion endangers the safety of the entire pipe tour. 
What that signifies every one in the profession 
will comprehend. 

Seven years ago, when I first exhibited to my 
colleagues the first automatically produced stone 
core, this core recovery received little attention. 
Nevertheless, this has proved satisfactory, al- 
though it is self-evident that these cores could have 
only a smaller diameter than the poles. It is my 
intention to produce a core of greater diameter. 
Here I present a core of 100 mm. diameter and 
will speak of this new core recovery in the next 
convention. — Naphta. 



Petroleum Development 
in Oklahoma 



Washington, Dec. 9, 1904. 
The annual report of the Governor of Okla- 
homa to the Secretary of the Interior contains an 
interesting account of the development of the 
petroleum and natural gas belt of the Territory 
during the past year, an estimate of the extent 
of the almost inexhaustable gypsum deposits and 
some observations with regard to the operation 



of two new laws in the Territory, one of which 
provides for the inspection of kerosene, gasoline, 
etc., while the other authorizes the manufacture 
and free distribution of blackleg vaccine by the 
Territorial Government. 

With regard to petroleum and natural gas the 
Governor says: 

"The^e valuable natural products are found in 
several parts of the Territory, and a number of 
enterprising communities and companies have 
been prospecting for several years with varying 
degrees of success, but now Oklahoma seems to 
be on the threshold of a great development of gas 
and oil product. 

"A line extended from the most westerly points 
in Kansas that are now producing gas and oil 
in commercial, quantities will cross Oklahoma 
from about where the Arkansas river crosses into 
the Territory southwesterly to the region of the 
Wichita mountains, and a line extended from the 
most easterly points in Kansas where the same 
product is found will pass southerly through In- 
dian Territory. A large part of Oklahoma lies 
within this triangle, which in Kansas and In- 
dian Territory and in the Osage Indian reserva- 
tion in Northeastern Oklahoma has developed an 
immensely valuable product of both natural gas 
and crude oil. 

"For a number of years crude oil has been 
known to exist in the region of the Wichita 
mountains, and considerable development has 
been carried out in this region in the vicinity of 
Granite, Hobart and Lawton. The oil is found 
at depths varying from less than 100 feet to about 
500 feet, producing an asphaltum oil which has 
been marketed in moderate quantities from some 
of the wells. A little natural ■ gas was also 
developed in some of the wells. 

"Natural gas has been struck in several "wells 
at Blackwell and also at Newkirk, in Kay coun- 
ty, at depths ranging from 600 to 850 feet and 
in quantities of commercial value, but difficulty 
has been experienced so far in keeping the water 
out of the gas sands. One well nine miles south- 
east of Newkirk, in Kay county, has been pro- 
ducing small quantities of gas and a high-grade 
crude oil for two years. Drilling is now in prog- 
ress or under contract near Oklahoma City, 
Blackwell, Ponca City, McLoud, Chandler. 
Shawnee, Cushing, Newkirk, Guthrie and several 
other points in this Territory, and Cleveland, in 
Pawnee county, at a depth of 1625 feet. This 
was followed soon after by the bringing in of 
two wells near Jennings, in the same county, es- 
tablishing a field in that region. 

"The greatest oil and gas development in this 
Territory so far has been along the eastern side 
of the Osage Indian reservation, where oil wells 
of great value and large product have been de- 
veloped for a number of years and where new 
wells are being constantly added to the district. 
The oil is marketed from Bartlesville arid the 
pipe lines recently completed there, and is found 
at a depth varying from 110 to 1600 feet. Many 
valuable gas wells developed in this region are 
closed up or abandoned because of the absence of 
manufacturing towns and interests to utilize the 
product. Recently this field has been extended 
westward by the drilling of two or three gas 
wells at Pawhuska, in the Osage Nation, one of 
the wells having one of the largest flows of nat- 
ural gas in the West, and found at a depth of 
1996 feet. These wells also showed an oil sand. 
Valuable oil wells have also been developed in 
the northern part of the Osage Nation. 

"The prospect drilling that has been done in 
Oklahoma heretofore has been mostly to depths 
of less than a thousand feet, with a few wells 
reaching a depth of 1600 or 1700 feet, but the 
recent valuable wells developed at Pawhuska and 






IF1C OH. 



in Pawner count)-, which arc the farther 

nmerria) a show 

that there is a gradual dip downward to thr 

.ird in the ga> and oil I >t tnr 

Indian Territi ind thai the 

is that have tlrvrlopril gas and oil in -mailer 
quantities have nut >rt reached their true oil ami 

vel. The (treat worth of natural .m- i- a 
fuel to the towns of Oklahoma lias induced mam 
communities and cities to attempt to develop it. 
and as the field of successful development moves 
west, instant!] doing, more anil mure 

drilling will he done until, no doubt, man] parts 
of Oklahoma will be producing oil and ph and 
manufacturing interests will lie developed ac- 
cordingly, as in the other natural gas fields of 
the W 

OIL INSPECTION. 

The Governor quotes the oil inspector of the 

Territory with regard to the inspection of oil 
under the recently enacted statute as follows: 

"Since the appointment of the present incum- 
bent, in April, 1903, to July I. 1904, there has 
been inspected 24,788 barrels of low-grade oil : 
22. 1 '48 barrels of the best grade, and ,i7,258 bar- 
rels of gasoline, making a total of 84,994 barrels 
inspected. Ot this 410 barrels were rejected. 

"There has been collected as inspection tecs 
the sum of $9,058.68, of which sum the amount 
of $7,104.13 has been paid into the territorial 
treasury and $1,954.55 has been retained by the 
inspector and for deputies. There are twenty- 
seven deputies in the Territory. The average 
fees for the year are $72.38. 

"The instruments used under the present meth- 
od of inspection are the Charles J. Tagliabu 
open-cup fire tester and the Baume hydrometer. 
Open-cup fire tester is used to make the flash 
test. 

"Under the present law the oil is tested very 
carefully. All coal oil is tested by the flash 
test, and must show a flash of at least 120 deg. 
temperature and must have a specific gravity of 
from 44 deg. to 48 deg. Baume, inclusive, to be 
marked "Good." All oil having a lower or higher 
specific gravity or that flashes at less than 120 
deg. temperature shall be marked 'unsafe — re- 
jected.' The flash test shows the safety of the 
oil, while the gravity shows the quality. 

"The present law seems to be giving the peo- 
ple of the Territory a better grade of oil than 
they have ever had before, and as the public be- 
comes more familiar with the law and its bene- 
fits it becomes much more pleasing to them. 
There are some details in which it might be 
improved, but it is in a great measure accomp- 
lishing the purpose for which it was enacted, i. 
e., to give the people of Oklahoma the best quality 
of oil possible to be procured for them." 



Guaranteed Investments 



The average investor, when he buys mining or 
oil stocks, expects that the money he subscribes 
will be used in the development of the property 
being operated by the company. If he is at all 
familiar with mining operations he knows that 
there is no certainty that the mine will prove a 
big dividend payer. He does know, however, 
that if the money raised from the sale of stock 
is spent judiciously in the development of the 
ground, he has a greater chance for big profits in 
mining than in any other business. To raise the 
necessary capital for the development of the 
ground in question is very often a difficult task, 
generally depending upon the location of the 
property and the ability of the promoter. Some 
promoters who find themselves unable to sell 
stock in the ordinary way adopt methods that are 
certainly questionable. By inference they make 



an impression upon the ini iuses him 

to in' ' ,t the 

>t the nieth- 

laini that the) guaranty the investments. 

When claims of this kind .ire investigated it is 

illy found that they ■ undation in 

The investor bins stock. The promoter 

takes a portion of the monej derived and buys 

biiiids. representing to the investor that the bond 
or trust compan) considered the mining stock so 
good that it guaranteed the repayment ot the 

principal at the end of a certain period whether 
or not the mine proved a success. Investors 
should know that it makes no difference to the 
building or trust compan) whether or not the 

mining stock has value behind it or not. iust 
so that the premiums on the bonds are kept up, 
The investor supposes that his money is being 

used tor the development of the mining prop- 
erty, where, is a matter "t fact, it goes to pay 
for the bond. It the promoter would use the 
mone) as ir should be used — in the development 
of the property — the investor would be satisfied. 
Government bonds are safe investments, but the 
investor, as a usual thing, is capable of buying 
his own bond without the aid of a mining pro- 
moter. The greatest fault to be found with 
guaranteed investments is that the promoter of 
them does not follow out the policy of pub- 
licity and let the investor know exactly what he 
has done with the money. If the investor knows 
just what per cent of his investment goes into 
the bond and how much goes to the property 
and to the promoter, there can be no fault found 
with the system. 



Capitalization at Par Value 



There is a class of promoters who are con- 
tinually taking advantage of the fact that the 
average investor knows little or nothing about 
capitalization and par value of company shares. 
These promoters will advertise stock of com- 
panies with five or ten million shares at two, 
three or four dollars per thousand shares, and 
by inference lead the ignorant investor to believe 
that he is getting a valuable interest in the com- 
pany at a trifling figure. It is only the foolish 
investor, the man or woman who never investi- 
gates before investing, who is a victim of the 
"catch-penny" schemes of these modern "finan- 
ciers." If a company is capitalized for one mil- 
lion shares, a block of one thousand shares rep- 
resents just one one-thousandth part of the capi- 
tal of the company. If a company has a capital 
stock of ten million shares, a block of one thou- 
sand shares represents one ten-thousandth part of 
the capital of the company. There are some peo- 
ple who seem to think that every mining and oil 
company is capitalized for one million shares 
with a par value of one dollar a share. These 
are the people who think they are getting shares 
with a par value of one dollar when in reality 
the stock has a par value of one or ten cents a 
share. The mining publications of the country 
should compel advertisers to give, in their ad- 
vertisements, the capitalization, par value of stock 
and number of shares of every company adver- 
tised. This would, to a certain extent, protect 
the investor against this fraudulent practice. 

Our New Years' Special Edition is to be a fea- 
ture of especial interest to all interested in the oil 
industry of California. It will contain a special 
article on every oil field in the State. Replete 
with fine cuts, representative of the growing in- 
dustry, the edition will be a material factor in the 
legitimate advancement of the California Oil In- 
dustry. Place your orders early for advertising 
space. We go to press on Thursday next. 



of the greatest finan 

opinion that the I nited 5 
i would he great!) b< in 
n of the investment spirit thro 
people, It is estimated that about one-fifth of the 

th ot the United S itcs is rcpn si ned 
deposits in the sa\ inks and by tin 

of the lite insurance companies. There are some 
twelve million savings bank deposits ind life in- 
surance policies, As main persons have life in- 
surance policies in more than one compan) it is 

sate to sa\ that one tenth of the population of the 
United States <iw N one-fifth of the wealth of 
the country. It is true that what the nation 
represents the nation's capital provided that salv- 
ing is not carried to the point where it In 
a defect, reducing the nation's courage and en- 
terprise. A savings' bank account properly used 
is a fine proposition for the average man work- 
ing tor a salary, although it basin some instances 
made misers out of open-hearted men. While it 
is a wise policy to save it is better to be able 
to invest wisely so as to produce the 
amount of income from surplus capital. By in- 
vesting wisely the investor promote^, in the high- 
est degree, the enterprise and general well being 
of the country. Savings banks and insurance 
companies are high up in the class of beneficent 
institutions. A nation of small investors may 
be saving and prosperous if they know how to 
lay aside a portion of their savings for a rainy 
day and invest the balance wisely. If the wage 
earners of the nation would put part of their 
savings in securities they would share the greater 
prosperity of the nation. This system would 
tend to distribute more widely through the peo- 
ple the ownership of the great producing agencies 
of the country. It would diminish the percentage 
of capital now under trustee control by the di- 
rectors of the savings banks and like institutions. 
No great amount of business sagacity is required 
for a man to open a savings account. If he can- 
not save in any other way the savings bank solves 
the question for him. It is far better for him 
to learn to invest his savings in securities and 
then take as active a part as possible in the control 
of the properties. — Bonds and Mortgages. 



"Much interest has been felt in different parts 
of the country in the use of oil for treating the 
surfaces of highways, in order to lay the dust 
and to offer a hard, impervious, waterproof sur- 
face. It is well known that in California such 
treatment of roads has met with a high degree of 
success. Similar experiments, however, when 
carried out in the East, proved complete fail- 
ures ; the Eastern oil failed to bind on the sur- 
face of the road, and did not lead to the de- 
sired result. When it was found that the 
main difference between the California natural 
oils and the Eastern and Texas oils lay in the 
fact that the California oils contained an as- 
phalt base, while the eastern oils contained a pa- 
raffine of vaseline base, the Division of Tests 
immediately suggested that the cause of the fail- 
ure of previous eastern experiments was directly 
due to this fact, and road builders throughout 
the country were urged to make experiments with 
mixtures of crude oils with crude asphaltum. Last 
summer the Commissioners of the District of Co- 
lumbia corisented to make such an experiment. A 
street in Washington was selected for the pur- 
pose and a number of mixtures of Southern crude 
oil and asphaltum was spread in adjacent sec- 
tions. At first the experiment was looked upon 
as a failure, but the road has been steadily 
improving, and at present there is every promise 
of the experiment proving a success. If it proves 
true that mixtures of eastern crude oil and as- 
phalutm make as good roads as the California 
oils do, a very great advance wil be made to- 
ward the betterment of our rural highways." — 
Eastern Exchange. 



PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 



NEWS FROM THE FIELD 

Supplied by Our Regular Correspondents— Recent 
Developments in tne Great Oil Fields of the West 



COALINGA 



The Associated Oil Company, in pursuance 
of its policy of controlling, as far as possible, 
the fuel oil of the field, has acquired the west 
end pipe line. This line is four and one-half miles 
in length, connecting the Maine State, Confi- 
dence, and Fresno-San Francisco with the ship- 
ping station at Ora. The Associated will begin 
running its oil through the line within ten days. 
"The company has begun the work of relaying the 
field system to- connect the producers of the 
extreme west end with its reciving station on 
section seven. A crew of men was sent out yes- 
terday to string the pipe. 

No reliable news concerning the operations of 
the Producers' Union Pipe Line Co. is available, 
but the matter of their projected entry into this 
field is much discussed. There seems to be no 
good reason why the enterprise should not be 
made successful, especially if, as stated, Dr. Dal- 
las, the representative of the company, has suc- 
ceeded in obtaining contracts for the delivery 
of 6,000,000 barrels of fuel oil. We have been 
informed that the company has contracted to 
pay 25 cents a barrel for that amount of oil, 
and that a market for the product is in sight. 
The beginning of actual work on the line would 
tend to greatly strengthen the feeling of confi- 



dence that 'is growing amongst the operators 
in the local field. 

It is evident that during January and Febru- 
ary there will be more development work under 
way than at any time in the history of the field. 

The Sauer Dough is coming to the front as one 
of the good producing properties. No. 3 has 
just been finished at a depth of 1327 feet and 
proves to be a remarkable well, its production be- 
ing 1100 barrels a day. C. C. Spinks, managing 
director of the company, is naturally much pleased 
with the result of his work on this well. He 
considered No. 1, with its production of 500 bar- 
rels, a pretty good well, but No. 3 exceeds 
all expectations, while No. 2, which is being 
finished up at 1067 feet, promises to be another 
good one. The Sauer Dough oil is 23 gravity. 

The Caledonia has set up a 1250-barrel tank, 
with a 10-6-10 pump. 

We cannot learn that the Associated Oil Com- 
pany is particularly successful in its efforts to 
secure the production of fuel oil in this field, 
notwithstanding its recent bid of 17l/> cents. A 
majority of the contracts recently made are fig- 
ured around 19 cents, and it is the general be- 
lief that a price at least a little higher will soon 
be reached. 

El Zumo Puro will shortly resume develop- 
ment. 



There is gladness among the shareholders of 
the Northeastern Oil Company these days. The 
well on the company's property has reached the 
sand at a depth of 2010 feet, and there is an ex- 
cellent showing of oil, though the well is only 
a few feet in the sand. Directors W. M. Zim- 
mermann and C. J. Campbell visited the well on 
Wednesday, and were highly pleased with the 
appearance of things. The company's stock was 
sold at 15 cents, and is all held locally. As a 
result of the showing obtained by Superintendent 
Reilly, the stock is now selling at 50 cents. 

The Caribou Oil Company has declared a div- 
idend of 7 cents per share, amounting to $5600, 
payable December 15. 

Maine State No. 8 was finished on Monday 
at 1700 feet, and has been put on the pump. 
Its production has not been gauged. No. 5 is 
being cleaned out. 

On the Guthrey lease No. 1 is pumping 250 
barrels of 20 gravity oil. No. 2 is 1400 feet deep, 
and is in the oil sand. A rig is being built for 
No. 3. 

On the authority of W. W. Parin it is stated 
that the Esperanza will soon resume development 
work by drilling its No. 5. 

The Bishop Fishing Tool Company is building 
an office and warehouse on the Guthrey lease. 

Many improvements have been made on the 
M. K. and T., wh'ich is now one of the best 
equipped properties in the field. No. 2 rig, 
just completed, is the strongest and most com- 
plete in the field. No. 1 is giving a good produc- 
tion. An analysis of the oil, made at the Uni- 
versity of California, shows very little asphaltum 



BULLFROG EXTENSION MINING COMPANY 



THIS COMPANY WAS STARTED RIGHT. It owns outright 
eighty acres of land through which runs the enormous outcropping of 
quartz, 200 feet wide, that is part of the original discovery made by 
"Shorty" Harris, which has resulted in opening up this new, wonderful 
mining district known as Bullfrog. Competent mining engineers state it 
will be a greater producing field than Goldfield. Goldfield has already 
produced a greater amount of gold in less time than any mining camp ever 
discovered. 

THE BULLFROG EXTENSION MINING COMPANY is 
sinking a shaft on the enormous quartz ledge with money in bank to pay 
for it. The lowest assay value of this ledge is $6.20; the highest $3,121.14. 
Samples taken from the surface. The Company will make shipments of 
high grade ore at an early date. Organized under the laws of Arizona. 
Capitalization one million, par value $1. $50,000 was offered for the 
land. 50,000 shares offered at 20 cents per share. Orders for stock by wire 
and letter are coming in very rapidly in large amounts. THE FIRST AL- 
LOTMENT WILL BE OVERSUBSCRIBED. Company has compe- 
tent, honest management; best land holdings of the field. IT DOES NOT 
OWE A DOLLAR TO ANYBODY FOR ANYTHING. Money in 
hand to pay for development work. IT WILL BE ONE OF THE BIG 
PRODUCERS. If there ever was a mining proposition in which all the 
elements of risk were eliminated at the beginning, this is one of them. You 
should buy stock of people whose reputations are as dear to them as yours 
is to you. THE DEBENTURE SURETY COMPANY is a responsible 
corporation; it stands high financially; it has the confidence of its cus- 
tomers. One of its stockholders bought 1000 shares at the organization of 
the Company two years ago at 20 cents a share. We have just paid him his 
20th dividend of five cents per share, which gives him $1000 within two 
years on his investment of $200. His 1000 shares now earn him in divi- 



dends as much money as $5000 invested would bring .at interest at 12 per 
cent, per annum. This customer has advised us to, sell his 1000 shares 
and place every dollar of it in BULLFROG EXTENSION MINING 
stock at 20 cents per share. He believes he will duplicate his former profit- 
able experience. Several of our other customers have advised us the same 
way. • 

We have another Company that within one year paid a dividend of 
$8 per share on the par .value of $100 per share. Place your orders for 
oil and mining stock with a responsible corporation. OUR OWN 
MONEY IS IN EVERY ENTERPRISE WE PROMOTE, AND WE 
LOOK AFTER YOUR INTERESTS AS CLOSELY AS WE LOOK 
AFTER OUR OWN. THE AVERAGE STOCK SALESMAN IS 
AFTER THE COMMISSION. WE ARE AFTER DIVIDEND 
RESULTS. We are building up a good reputation on that basis. If 
you have $10 to $10,000 to invest quickly place it in shares of the BULL- 
FROG EXTENSION MINING COMPANY at 20 cents per share, 
then watch it grow into large profits. The allotment of 50,000 shares at 
20 cents per share, half cash, the balance in two payments in three and six 
months, will soon be sold. 

THE AMERICAN DUCHESS OIL COMPANY is one of our 
big, strong Companies. A big block of that stock was oversubscribed. An- 
other big advance in price of its stock soon. It is making splendid progress; 
let us tell you about it. The 50,000 shares of the BULLFROG EXTEN- 
SION MINING COMPANY will be soon sold. Wire us your reserva- 
tion, then investigate ; if you don't want the stock don't take it. Remember 
that we will always give you exact facts. No more, no less. WE HAVE 
LEARNED THAT INVESTORS WANT FACTS. 
USE THE WIRES. IT PAYS. 

DEBENTURE SURETY COMPANY w 



Rialto Building 
A. 5. 



San Francisco, Cal. 



PACIFK 



KlkR 



illuminating and lu- 

On the nr« San Ff le two new 

are bring built. No. 4 will I- ij the 

drillers in about ten well 

recentlv rin ifficicnt water tor all 

depth of 4. 
tank has been erected. The production is being 
delivered to the C Q. I . < 

■t deep, with a 16- 
inch hide. 

with 
Stockholders No. 3, which is 900 feet deep, with 
I he -and is expected in a 
daj nr two. 

An answer has been filed in the case of the 
Ni'w I ngland and Coalinga ( >il Company against 
\I. Congdi ti, C. I . Boyd and others. It consists 
ncral and specific denial of the ownership 
of plaintiff of the N. W. quarter ot section 24, 
in the Coalinga district, and denies that the plain- 
tiff has been in any way damaged by the 
panel of the land by the defendants, who as- 
sert their right to absolute control. 

On Monday the Esperanza paid its usual 
monthly dividend of 1 cent a share — $1250. 

Harrison M. Zeir, of Los Angeles, and associ- 
ates have let a contract tor the drilling of a well 
on ill acres recently acquired by them on section 
1, north of the Roberts. 

Three strings of tools are working on the Co- 
alinga- Peerless. No. 3 is 550 feet deep; No. 4 
is 650 and No. 5 700. The production of 1 and 
2 is being delivered to the C. O. T. 

The St. Paul-Fresno No. 3 is coming into oil, 
which is of somewhat lighter gravity than that 
produced by the two wells. 

The Big Shell Oil Co., which started a well 
last spring on the Domengine place, on section 
20, and was compelled to close down owing to 
failure of the water supply, will shortly resume 
work on the hole, which is 1200 feet deep. 

We are informed that the holders of the north 
half of section 2, 20-15 are making preparations 
to drill a well. 

Coalinga-Pacific No. 1 is keeping up its pro- 
duction of 18 gravity oil. This company will 
spud in No. 2 soon after the first of the year. 

A battery of boilers is being installed on the 
S. W. & B. No. 3 will be ready for the drillers 
in a few days. 

Three new wells were drilled on the Inde- 
pendence. 

The Confidence is on the list of companies 
which will resume drilling in the near future. 

After nearly a year's work, Fresno-San Fran- 
cisco No. 3 has been cleaned out and got into 
good condition. It is now producing about 150 
barrels a day. No. 4 is spudding in. — Record. 



KERN 



L. E. Doan and C. A. Barlow have returned 
from San Francisco and bring encouraging re- 
ports of the progress that is being made by the 
executive committee of the Independent Oil Pro- 
ducers' Agency, which is working industriously, 
and that they will soon be able to report the re- 
sult of their labors to the directors of the Agency. 
The result of these labors is expected to be a con- 
tract for the available product of the independent 
companies, and it is believed that the contract 
will be a satisfactory one to all the producers. 

Everyone who has occasion to observe the work 
of the committee speak in the highest terms both 
of their ability and of the energy and unselfish- 
ness with w^hich they arc working for the better- 
ment of the oil industry in California. 

The committee consists of the president, M. V. 



the treasurer, W. B. R 

men in cfi • on "t 

the independents, ha- in consultation 

«ith the committee hn I the time. 

lent I'-- is the 

itlj formed organization ot non-asso< 
oil operators in the Kirn river and McKittrick 
fields is called, is about to market the product 
under its control in a single deal. 

This ii the purport of an Interview with \V. 
S. Morton, president ot the Potomac ( )il ' 
pain, one ot the leading independent operator-. 

"This agency's executive committee is now in 
San Francisco, engaged in negotiations which, 
1 believe, will result in a disposition, for a fixed 
period, of the product of the scleral companies 
that compose the independent organization," said 
Mr. Morton. "There are four possible custom- 
ers tor the product — the Standard Company, the 
Associated Company, the Pacific Oil and Trans- 
portation Con pain , and a syndicate of Eastern 
capitalists acting through a representative in 



ifield. I'll 

barrel foi 

n, one halt ol 
I 5 cents. Just ■ ;!ic oil 

will he known in 
ive nrll make a com 

months, ind 1 believe rice will be more than 

nt- pel barrel : I I had i 

■ the price. 1 would v 

While Mr. Morton would not con I .; himself 
on the point, it was evident that hi 
the probabilities were in favor of a deal with 

the Standard. Of all the bidders for the oil, 

the Standard, with its marketing facilities and 

trade line- established, is in a position to deal 
most liberally with the agi 

I oi about a month the Standard has been tak- 
ing no Kern river oil, except sueh as it was 
obliged to take under current contracts. This 
refusal to buj oil cannot he based on a lack 
ni storage capacity, because at present there is 

about 3,000,000 barrels of unused storage capacity 
in the Kern river field. There is a beliei th ; 
the policy is dictated by a desire to assist the 



H. B. GUTHREY 

Oil Well Contractor 

Specifications furnished on wells o? any depth 
J==== in any country , 

WATER SHUT OFF IN OIL WELLS 

/Many valuable oil properties in this state saved by our pr. cess 
which is sure and permanent 

Our references are our past customers 

H. B. GUTHREY, 

COALINGA, CAL. 



DIRECTORS. 
M. Grossmayer. 
S. Fleisher. 
J. B. Bonetti. 
T. R. Finley. 
S. A. Johnson. 
C. F. Bramming. 
James Smith. 



OFFICERS. 
M. Grossmayer, Pres. 
S. Fleisher, Vice Pres. 
J. B. Bonetti, Treas. 
T. R. Finley, Sec'y. 
S. A. Johnson, Gen. Mgr. 



Barca Oil Company 



CAPITALIZATION, $500,000; PAR VALUE STOCK, $1.00 PER SHARE. 



The property of this Company consists of 250 acres of land, situated one-half mile north of 
the famous Purissima well of the Union Oil Company, which has been flowing 500 barrels of oil 
daily for the past year, and it is directly in line between that well and the same company's 
famous 12,000-barrel gusher on the Hartnell Tract. 

We are offering enough stock in our Company at 25 cents per share to drill our first well 
and at this price the stock is the best and safest investment so far offered in the Santa Maria Pi- 
trict, and a sure money-maker for those who invest. 

Our well No. 1 is now drilling and will be pushed to completion as rapidly as possible. 

For further information address 



BARCA OIL COMPANY, 



SANTA MARIA, CAL. 



10 



PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 



independents in their organization scheme, the 
-idea being that when the producers who have 
shown a disinclination cannot depend on the 
Standard for a customer, they will feel it wise 
to seek a market refuge with the agency. 

The Standard is credited with great friendli- 
ness for the Independent Producers' Agency. 



•SANTA MARIA 



The Union Oil Company's great gusher still 
continues to manifest unusual force and the oil 
continues to come to the surface at a tremendous 
rate. This unusual and unexpected quantity of 
oil coming in so suddenly has had the effect of 
shutting down other wells on account of a lack 
of tankage at Port Harford. Everything at 
the port is filled and until a steamer arrives 
to relieve some of the tanks no more oil can be 
transported. 

The Brookshire Company has begun erecting 
a derrick over the well which recently caught 
fire. At the time it was reported that the well' 
was permanently injured, but happily this is not, 
the case. 

The Coblentz Oil Company has completed its 
derrick and by January 1 will begin spudding in. 
A number of new oil people have arrived in 
the field and secured valuable leases and in some 
cases purchased the property outright. Among 
those whose property will be developed are 
Messrs. Sam Gray, Dr. Lucas and S. Campodo- 
nico. 

The Rice Oil Company, operating in Cat Can- 
yon, is contemplating some changes in its drill- 
ing. The company has had considerable reverses 
since its beginning, but the outlook now is very 
The Independent of recent date states that a 
suit is about to develop in the Superior Court 
in which the county will be the plaintiff and the 
Graciosa Oil Company will be the defendant. 
The pleadings will be based upon the refusal of 
the oil company to pay taxes assessed for the 
fiscal year on its holdings on the Harris ranch, 
near Santa Maria. A very important point is 
involved, attorneys disagreeing as to the right of 
the county assessor to assess oil bearing property 
upon the leasehold basis — that is to say, to as- 
sess the portion of the Harris ranch upon which 
the company is operating in accordance with 
apparent productive value, instead of assessing 
the ranch as a whole. The Graciosa Company, 
however, objects to this system of taxation, and 
proposes to pay taxes on no more land than it 
actually holds under lease. The tax levy upon 
its improvements, such as machinery, tools, cas- 
ing, etc., have been paid, but the company re- 
fuses to pay the tax upon the real estate, or 
leasehold, until the question as to its responsi- 
bility can be established in the courts. 

On the strength of oil being supplied free by 
the Union Company from its gusher on the Hart- 
nell ranch, Supervisor Elliot is doing some ex- 
cellent work on the roads in his district. The 
company having more oil on its hands than it 
can conveniently store or dispose of at the pres- 
'ent time, notified the Supervisor that all the oil 
he wanted was his for the carrying away. And 
as free oil is an item of considerable importance, 
he quickly embraced the opportunity. In ad- 
dition to the regular sprinklers, he improvised 
several more, until now he has ten six-horse 
sprinklers hauling oil from the reservoirs near 
the gusher and twenty more teams hauling gravel 
from the Suey pit with which to prepare the roads 
for their oil bath. Another large force of men 
are at work in various places to perform other 
necessary work. Over 800 barrels of oil are 
being used daily, and have ben for a week or 
more. At the regular rate the district has paid 
for oil previously used — 60 cents at the well — 



Flow of Natural Gas 
Increased by . . . 

Cooper's Gas Lift 

AI§o fiow of water 
or oil Increased and 
gas saved 

A. S. COOPER, C. E., 



219 Crocker Building 
San Francisco, Cal. 



WE SELL 

BARLOW & HILL 



UP=TO= 
DATE . 



MAPS 



WHICH ARE THE ONIY 

RELIABLE MAP PUBLISHED 



Large Blue Prints $1.50 

Book containing Small Indexed Maps 

of all the California Fields, each 50 

Per Dozen.... 5.00 

PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 

318 PINE STREET 

San Francisco 



..OIL TANKS.. 

Oil Stills, Car Tanks, Riveted Pipe, Storage Tanks of 
every capacity and every description. Write for Estimates 

WM. GRAVER TANK WORKS 

77 Jackson Boulevard - CHICAGO, ILL. 

We Promote, Finance and Incorporate 

L,et us show you the advantages of incorporating your business or enterprise. 
If you need money to enlarge your business, permit us to secure it for you, by selling 
stock through our Eastern correspondents. 

CONSOLIDATED AUDITING COMPANY 

307 to 310 Mills Building, San Francisco. 
Telephone Bush 849. 



WRITE US TO-DAY ! 
If you want to invest your money in a sound business proposition where you are sure 
to receive ten dollars for every one dollar invested 

BUY BUFFALO-CALIFORNIA OIL STOCK. 
This company is incorporated under a special act of Congress providing for the incor- 
poration of companies in the District of Columbia, making our stock absolutely non-assessable 
We hold some of the most valuable oil property in the well known 

HALFMOON BAY DISTRICT, 
San Mateo County, California, 
Now possessing many fine oil wells producing 52° to 55° gravity oil. But we cannot tell it all 
here. Write us for full particulars. 

Correspondence with reliable brokers and agents solicited. 

BUFFALO-CALIFORNIA OIL CO., 

Fletcher Block, 

Livermore, California. 



C. V. Hall Iron Works 

(LOCATION, OLINDA, ORANGE CO., CAL.) 

POSTOFFICB ADDRESS, Route No. 2. 
FULLERTON. CAL. 

Los Angeles Office, 222 Wilcox Building, 
LOS »NGELES, CAL. 

The C V. H. Chain Tongs can be had through 
any dealer in oil well supplies. 

These tongs are made of the very best steel, 
in any size, and always give satisfaction. 

Manufacturers or users of chain tongs do so 
at their own risk, in any infringements of 
Patent No. 438,177, the ownership of 
which belongs to the undersigned. 

CHARLES VICTOR HALL. 




PACIFIC Ol I ,1KR 



11 



this .1 

thr |«-..|<;<' can thank 
the I ivam . I • 

ami lihcr.% nded, and 

rp <.iliir\vh.it h 

It is 
mil) .1 ^rratrr 

cent* .lelivercil to the tank 

at the dep' cents. Roads in all parts 

of the district are hrine sprinkled, no favoritism 
brin;; shown, and it is to he hoped the spirit of 
liberality will continue tor some time in nnlrr 
that all the roads may be placed in a condition 
to wa rrant the statement that they are among 
the best in the State. And in the matter < it" teams 
anil men. at no time in the district's historj was 
there ever a greater force employed— which like- 

i quite an item of expense in itself. 



Selecting a Lubricating 
Oil 



In France the automobile question has been 
discussed in all its bearings by both lay ami tech- 
nical press. The subject of lubricants is regarded 
as of vital importance and has been given consid- 
erable attention. In an article on this subject 
the Journal de Petrole says that the lubricant of 
an engine of 2-horse power cannot be the same 
as the lubricant of one 20-horse power. 

Absolutely fixed rules, says this authority, can- 
not be given for the composition of the lubricant 
to be used in all motors. It is especially neces- 
sary that the supply of the lubricant to the cyl- 
inders should be made as regular as possible, and 
it must not be forgotten that the inside of the 
cylinder is regularly submitted to a very high 
temperature, due to the explosions, which occa- 
sions the vaporization of the lubricant, and even 
its decompositions. In the latter case, a deposit 
of carbon takes place, which inconvenience should 
be suppressed as far as possible. That is why lu- 
bricants not readily decomposed are preferable to 
those of the opposite tendency, and consequently 
petroleum oils are to be preferred to colza and 
olive oils, and to fats. The composition of the 
oils to be employed is quite varied, but we give 
that of a good lubricant suitable for automobiles 
of from 6 to 10-horse power: Ten gallons of 
Russian motor oil, one gallon of extra refined 
cylinder oil, thirty gallons of heavy American 
motor oil. 

For vehicles of less power a lighter Ameri- 
can oil may be employed, and for those of greater 
power the quantity of cylinder oil may be in- 
creased. Some chauffeurs prefer to add a certain 
quantity of fatty oils,- like olive oil, but we think 
that these should not be employed for the reasons 
given previously. The higher flashing points of 
oils are embraced between 530 deg. and 600 deg. 
Fahrenheit. Such oils would be excellent for lu- 
brication, but cannot be employed, not being suf- 
ficiently fluid. That is why oils are preferred for 
motors of which the flashing point is 420 deg. F. 



FOR SALE. 



' per share. 
-hares Bl 
share. 

W. E, BARNARD, 

■'-•nth Street. Oakland, Calif 



We manufacture the best 
lubricating oils for oil 
drillers 

KING KEYSTONE OIL CO., 
204 Front St., San Francisco 



BARGAIN 

Complete Oil Rig for Sale 

Including two String Tools 
and Fishing Tools 

Ovcp 3O0O feet of catling In £ood condi- 
tion — some never used — sizca, 
9X\ 8 Inch and 6 inch drive pipe 

The Above Property 
Cost Over $10,000 

and is tor mile at a bargain 

Exchange No. 22 

Care this Publication 



the: 
KROHN 

WIRE ROPE SOCKET 

THE ONLY SOCKET USING A BALL CLUTCH 



LASTING QUALITIES UNEQUALLED 



PATENT 



CLUTCH 




DEVICE 



Fop Sale by ALL 

OIL WELL 5UPPLY HOUSES 




LLEWELLYN IRON WORKS 

SOLE MANUFACTURERS 

LOS ANGELES, CAL. 



Write for Circular 




O I L 

WELL 

SUPPLIES 
EXCLUSIVELY 



AH Fully Equipped We Have 



^ THE LARGEST STOCK ^ 



ON THE 



PACIFIC COAST 



R. H. HERRON CO. 



509 Mission St. 

SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 



5 



STORES 



PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 






Far the cylinders of automobiles worked by 
steam, it may be said that an excellent lubricant 
can he prepared by mixing varying quantities of 
cylinder oil and of heavy motor oil, with a cer- 
tain quantity of fatty oil; for example, 30 gal- 
lons of cylinder oil : 20 gallons of heavy motor 
oil ; 4 gallons of tallow. 



Prosperity of the Industry 

There is no doubt but that the mining industry 
has had its share of the prosperity that has marked 
the progress of the nation during the past year. 
The year 1904, as a matter of fact, was a red 
letter year for the industry. And this is not 
all. There is every indication that the. im- 
provement noted during the year just closing will 
continue and that the mines of the west will, as 
each succeeding year goes by, prove the source of 
even greater wealth. New strikes are being made 
and new gold camps being opened. Labor trou- 
bles, that have stopped gold production to a 
great extent in several sections of the west, are 
now matters of history. Improved methods of 
ore treatment and the extension of the railroads 
into the mountains of the mining camps are both 
doing much to increase the output of gold. In 
Colorado the new Moffat railroad, from Denver 
to Salt Lake City, is being constructed with all 
rapidity and steel is now being laid on the west 
side of the continental divide. This road has 
opened up a wonderful country between Denver 
and Grand county. The new road to Tonopah, 
Nevada, completed during the past year, is doing 
a wonderful business, and it has been announced 
officially that this line will be completed to Gold- 
field within the near future. Cripple Creek, free 
from the labor agitator, is producing over $2,000,- 
000 monthly and the stock market shows a great 
improvement under this new condition of af- 
fairs. There is however one matter that should 
be looked after by the friends of mining. That 
is the establishment of the permanent home of the 
American Mining congress at Denver. Just what 
plans have been made for a permanent home in 
that city are not known. Denver should do her- 
self proud in this matter. The American Min- 
ing congress should have a permanent home. The 
building should- stand as a monument of the 
growth and importance of the mining industry. 



The Bureau of Corpor- 
ations 



It is reported from Washington that the Bu- 
reau of Corporations will investigate the Stan- 
dard Oil Company. It is known that the Stan- 
dard Oil Company has always been opposed to 
the policy of publicity that is doing so much to 
protect investors against the work of unscrupu- 
lous promoters. Time alone will tell whether or 
not the Standard Oil Company will resist an in- 
vestigation should the bureau of corporations de- 
cide to make it. It is known however that the 
Standard Oil people were strong opponents of 
the publicity of President Roosevelt and of the 
establishment of the bureau of corporations. The 
bureau cannot select a better subject for the work 
outlined than the big company mentioned. It is 
the strongest financial power in the United States 
and the investigation should first be made of 
it. If the law is to be tested in the courts the 
sooner the battle is over the better. When once 
established, the right to investigate would not 
be questioned by any corporation in the coun- 
try. All mining and oil companies would throw 
their books open to the public and as a result 
there would be more confidence in such enter- 
prises and more capital for investment. The bu- 
reau of corporations will no doubt be of great 
help to every honest corporation. 



FRESNO COUNTY ABSTRACT COMPANY 

Incorporated Under the Laws of California January 21, 1901. 

Capital Stock $100,000.00 



FUL.L.Y PAID UP 

SEARCHERS OF RE CORDS AND CONVEYANCE 

Abstracts of Title Carefully Compiled at Reasonable Rates. 

NO. 1115 K ST,~ FRESNO, OAI 

SMITH, EMERY <&. CO. 

=^ Chemical Engineers 




ANALYSES 

PETROLEUM — Calorific Value, 
Fractional Distillation, Refining, Vis- 
cosity, Freezing, Candle Power, Burn= 
ing, Tests, Etc. Boiler Feed & Drink- 
ing Water. Umpire Work on Oil Contracts. 

83-85 New Montgomery Street 

SAN FRANCISCO 




ALWAYS FIRST: 



Ever had trouble in getting the size 
of casing or drive pipe you needed? 



TRY USi 



We can help you. We carry ALL the regular 
sizes and the following specials: 

13^2 inch Boston "Diamond B" Casing 42 pounds 



12^ 
10 

9 s /s 
8% 

1% 

6Vs 

SV» 

4V* 

7 

5 

2 

3 



" 34 

" 35 

" 3oK 

" 24# 

20 

" i7# 

" 17 

" 939 

" Drive Pipe 23.27 

14.50 

" Tubing \y 2 

" 8^ 



Don't you think we can suit you ? 



THE NATIONAL SUPPLY COMPANY 

Los Angeles, San Francisco, Bakersfield, 
Mc Kittrick, Coalinga, Santa Maria. 



PACIFIC Oil. 






1ER 



CAM KJK \M> 



( HI 



ilic formal 
• the «crk ending Wednesday, 

' — 
1.! 
Cariboi 

ird — 



shares at . . 

- ;it . . 
Four — 
I.N 

1,000 -!nrr< at . . 
Hoici 

lares at . . 
share; at . . 
Independence — 

lares at . . 
-hare; at . . 
kern (Old)— 

1 00 shares at . . 
Monte Cristo — 

1,200 shares at . . 
8 shares at 

I )ccidental — 

1,000 shares at 
Oil City Petroleum — 

3,300 shares at . . 
Sovereign — 

shares at 



.18 

.43 
.40 
.45 

.55 

.4 i 

.41 

50 
.31 

5.0 i 



77i. 

80 

08 

68 

32 

Fwentv-Eight — 

10 shares at 12.00 

Wolverine — 

200 shares at 43 



Following are the latest quotations 
of oil companies listed on the Califo 
and Oil Exchange. 

Bid 

Alma 

Apollo 35 



.26 

.17 
. 00 

.70 
.20 



Ass. Oil Co. Stk. Tr. Cer. 

California-Standard 

Caribou 6. 

Central Point Con 

Chicago Crude 

Claremont 

Coalinga & Pacific 50 

Esperanza 1 .00 

Forty 45 

Four 54 

Fulton 50 

Giant 20 

Hanford 

Home 40 

Illinois Crude 

Imperial 

Independence 33 

Junction 20 

Kern 5.00 

Kern ( New) 

Kern River 

Linda Vista 17 

Maricopa 

McKittrick 10 

Monarch of Arizona 20 

Monte Cristo SO 

< )ccidental of W. Va 

Oil City Petroleum 67 

Petroleum Center 

Piedmont 06 

Reed Crude 2.10 

S. F. & McKittrick 

Section Seven 

Senator 70 

Sovereign 31 

Sterling 2.00 

Superior 03 

Teck 

Thirty-Three 

Toltec 23 

Twenty-Eight 

Union 

United Petroleum 100.00 

West Shore 1.50 

\Vol\ nine 



for stocks 
rnia Stock 

Asked. 
.80 
.40 
.27 
.19 
10.00 



.22 
.85 



1.75 

250.66 

.45 

.70 

16.50 



.22 


.30 
12.00 


.10 


.30 


08 
.68 
.10 


3.00 
1.00 


.33 


1.15 

8.25 


13.00 
70.00 



.50 



WESTERN COOPERAGE CO. 

MAM! I U OP 

STAVES and HEADING 

For Both Tl£l,t nnd Slack Work. 



OUR SPECIALTIES A R EC 

WhiteSpruceSaves and Heading Fir Tight Barrel Staves and 

all ready to set up lor Fish, | j Heading lor Oil, Lard, Pork, 

Pickles or Lard packages of '. 8ee) c (c Etc 

any size. ooo 

Fir Slack Barrel Staves and Heading for Asphalt, Lime 
Cement and Bottle Barrels. 



Prompt and Courteous Attention to alt Inquiries. 



MILLS at Aberdeen, Wash, and Houlton, Ore. 



[S I MAP COMPI 
The most complete map of th 
ever published has just bc< n i omp 
Famous up-to-date map-maki Hill, 

Bakersfield, Cal. I tch pipe line is carefully 
surveyed and each >■ 
land holding* have been brou 
date and the map is a line specimen of the map- 
makers' art, ll Mill are interested in the Coal 
inga held you should not he without one. Price 
irge blue-prints, $1.50 each. Order direct 
from the makers or from the I'm ii i, Oil Ri 
PORTER, 318 Pine street, San Francisco. 



Lacy Manufacturing Company 



Manufacturers of 




Steel Water Pipe 
General Sheet 
Iron Works 
Oil Well Casing 
Oil Stills 

OIL STORAGE AND WAGON TANKS 

Works: Cor. New Main and Date streets. P. O. Box 231, Station C. 

Baker BlocK Telephone Main 196 

Office, 334 North Main Street, Los Angeles, Cal. 

BATES' 

PATENT CASING TONGS 




1416-1426 19th St.. BakcrsTield. Cal. 



Fills a long-felt want. No more need of 
pole and rope for screwing up casing Bates 
Tongs can be applied to the casing anywhere 
in driving or pulling without danger of Injury 
or parting casing. 

Set No. 1, with any two size jaws from q5/n 
to 13 J^ inches 

Set No. 2, with any two size jaws from 4 to 
gYs inches. 




CAR TANKS AND STORAGE TANKS 

FOR ALL USES 

We Carry in Stock Car Tanks of following sizes: We Carry in Slock Storage Tanks for Oil 

6,000 Gallons 
7,000 " 
8,000 " 

and can mount on wood or steel uuderframts. 



of all sizes up to and including 
55,000 BARRELS 

Oil Refineries Complete Our Specialty 



WARREN CITY BOILER WORKS 

office: and WORKSz-WARREN. OHIO. 



H 



PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 



PETROLEUM NOTES. 



The Claremont Oil Company has declared a 
dividend of 1 cent per share. Though the regu- 
lar time for the payment of this dividend would 
be January 1, the directors will pay it on De- 
cember 22 to help the stockholders out. 

The Caribou. Four Oil and Kern River paid 
' their regular monthly dividends yesterday. 

The California Stock and Oil Exchange will 
adjourn from the close of business Friday, De- 
cember 23, to Tuesday morning, December 27, 
at 10:30 o'clock. 

Apollo Oil Company will pay its first divi- 
dend of 1 cent per share on the capital stock 
of the company, amounting to $2000, tomor- 
row. 

. The Four Oil Company paid a dividend of 2 
cents per share, against 1 cent, amounting to 
$6000, on December 15. 

The Caribou Oil Company has declared a 
dividend of 7 cents per share on the capital 
stock of the company, amounting to $5600, pay- 
able December 15. 

The Kern river oil field is said to be shipping 
out 200 barrels of oil daily, about 1,200,000 bar- 
rels monthly. 

It is said that the production of the Coalinga 
oil field for the year 1904 will be from 4,500,000 
to 5,000,000 barrels, just about double that of 
the preceding year. This is now the busiest field 
in the State in point of development, there being 
about forty strings of tools at work. 

C. A. Barlow, the well known oil man of 
Bakersfield, was a visitor in San Francisco during 
the week. 

The recent incorporation of the Consoli- 
dated Oil Company, with a capital of $3,000,- 
000, by well known Los Angeles citizens, for 
the purpose of developing the rich oil fields in 
the vicinity of Carlsbad, N. M., has naturally 
awakened lively interest among the holders of 
valuable oil stock and property in Los Angeles, 
and J. J. Lonergan, who Is fresh from New 
Mexico Territory, is sought for nearly every hour 
of the day by parties who desire to obtain all 
inside information possible. The incorporation 
papers will arrive in Los Angeles in a few days 
from Phoenix, Ariz., and soon thereafter a meet- 
ing of the stockholders will be held for the elec- 
tion of directors and officers. In the meantime 
the gentlemen intersted in the development plans 
are losing sleep getting rady for energetic op- 
erations in the oil field". A stockholder says that 
all rights of the company have been secured and 
that there is no fear of the Eastern people now 
rushing into the territory, jumping any claims 
or rights, for the company has a resident man- 
ager on the ground to guard all interests. 

Adams Bros., who are known to be among 
the most successful men in Los Angeles in the 
development of the local oil field, are contem- 
plating taking a large interest in the Carlsbad 
field and are planning to move valuable well- 
drilling outfits to the Gyp Creek district. 

A letter received from Carlsbad, dated De- 
cember 12, states that Colonization Agent Tal- 
mage, representing the Santa Fe Railwav Com- 
pany, reached Carlsbad on Tuesday from Chicago 
with a party of Eastern operators and investors. 
All will hold a meeting to perfect and elaborate 
plans for speedy operations in the field. The 
writer adds that the company has formed plans 
to put a town on the railroad for immediate 
transportation to the center of the oil field, and 
that a corps of surveyors will at once begin to 
lay out the town of Oil City and survey for the 
more important oil sections. 

Secretary Lonergan, representing the Consoli- 
dated Oil Company, is negotiating with J. L. 
Berry of Los Angeles for the purchase of three 
well-drilling outfits, which will be forwarded 
to Carlsbad without delay. 



H 



PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 

is the only 

OIL JOURNAL 

Published on the 

Pacific Coast. 

It gives full, fresh and authentic oil news from 
all the oil districts, new and old. It exposes 
fraudulent oil companies. It gives the latest 
information on oil stocks and dividends. It 
describes the latest method of drilling wells, 
pumping, piping and storing oil; use of oil for 
road making, etc. 

It is the only paper which advocates the belief 
that California's refined asphalt is the equal 
of Trinidad asphalt for paving and other pur- 
poses, and is in every way superior to bitumi- 
nous rock, the use of which has given San 
Francisco, Oakland and other California cities 
so many poor streets. 

The subscription price is $2.50 a year. If you 
are interested in any way in California oil, cut 
out the following coupon, fill in the blank lines, 
and send It, accompanied by check, money 
or express order to the 

PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 

318 Pine St. San Francisco 



Subscription Blank 



[i Year J2-SP 

6 Months 1.50 
3 Months 1.00 



Pacific Oil Reporter 

318 Pine Street San Francisco. 



?or- 



Please enter my subscription to the PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 
at $ 



Signed 



Address- 



Date- 



PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 



Vol. 6. No. 9 



San Francisco, Cal., Saturday, Dec. 31, 1904 



PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 

Published Weekly. 
The Oil Authority of the Pacific Coast. 
California Petroleum Miner-' 

M \Ri\ R. Wis v. Proprietor. 
I . S. Eastman, Editor and Manager. 



Price 25 Cents 



OFFICE AND EDITORIAL ROOMS 
M8 Pine Street - - San Francisco. California 

Telephone, Hush 176. 
TERMS. 

( . )ll( - Vcar £2.50 

Six .Months 1 .50 

Three Months J .00 

Single Copies 10 

STRICTLY IN ADVANCE. 

Money should he sent by Postal Order, Draft 
or Registered Letter, addressed to Pacific Oil 
Reporter, 318 Pine Street, San Francisco, rooms 
31-32-33. Communications must be accompanied 
by writer's name and address, not necessarily for 
publication, hut as a guarantee of good faith. 

Entered in the Postoffice at San Francisco, Cal- 
ifornia, as second class matter. 

Latest Quotations 



Gravity at 60 d 
Oil of 22 deg., up 
( )il of 24 deg., up 
Oil of 25 deg., up 
( )il of 26 deg., up 
( )il of 27 deg., up 
( )il of 28 deg., up 
( )il of 29 deg., up 

The Associated 
cents for fuel oil. 



Price 
per barrel. 



The prices offered by the Pacific Coast Oil 
Company for spot California crude oil at the 
wells are as follows: 

COALINGA. 

eg. temperature, 
to, but not including 24. .$0.20 
to, but not including 25 . . .30 
to, but not including 26. . .35 
to, but not including 27. . .40 
to, but not including 28 . . .45 
to, but not including 29. . .50 
to, but not including 30. . .55 
Oil Company is offering 17Vb 



SANTA MARIA. 

Gravity at 60 deg. Price per barrel 

Temperature. at Port Harford. 

25 deg., up to, but not including 26 $0.50 

26 deg., up to, but not including 27 55 

27 deg., up to, but not including 28 60 

28 deg., up to, but not including 29 65 

29 deg., up to, but not including 30 70 

30 deg., up to, but not including 31 75 

31 deg., up to, but not including 32 80 

^2 deg. and up 85 

KERN RIVER. 

Fuel Oil, 14 deg. gravity or better 18 

EASTERN QUOTATIONS. 

Pennsylvania $1 .60 

'Fiona 1.75 

Corning 1 .37 

New Castle 1.47 

North Lima 1 .07 

South Lima I . 02 

Indiana 1 .01 

■Somerset 1.01 

Ragland 60 

Petrolea (Ont.) 1.53 

KANSAS-INDIAN TERRITORY. 

Oil of 32 degrees gravity $0.87 

Oil of 3 1 ] /■_■ degrees gravity 82 

Oil of 31 degrees gravity 77 

Oil of 30' 2 degrees gravity 72 

Oil of 30 degrees gravity 67 

Oil of 29 W, degrees gravity 62 

Oil of 29 degrees gravity 57 

Oil of 28 7 2 degrees gravity 52 

Oi! of 28 degrees gravity 47 




Retrospect and Prospect 

f Al.l a dozen years' experience in the vicissitudes oi producing oil in the State 
oi California has been required to put the industrj on a basis where it would 
be a sale business proposition for one to attempt to develop a property with 
anything like a surety of getting hack the monej expended in making a hole 
in the ground. 

California lias produced some mineral oil since the year 187i>, which is accredited with a 

production of 12,000 barrels. Even previous to this a small production is claimed estimated 

at probably 175, Dili) barrels altogether — but it is not until 19U0 that any great increase is noted 
During 1899 there was 2,642,095 barrels of oil produced in the State, and these figures were 
nearlj doubled the following year, 1900, the output being 4,324,484 barrels. Again in 1901 the 
output was doubled, 8, 780,330 barrels, and in 1902 California produced the enormous amount 
of 13,984,268 barrels, nor was this the limit, for again in 1903 another enormous gain was 
shown, the figures reaching 24,337,828 barrels, Kern alone producing more than lb.000,000 
barrels of fuel oil. 

Everyone had gone "oil crazy" in the early part of 1900 and companies were being floated 
on every side to develop properties in the newly discovered fields of the State. Land values 
advanced to an almost prohibitive figure and for a time it was almost possible to sell stock for 
the development of a patch of blue sky. In the oil belt forests of derricks could be seen on 
every side. Little tented cities sprung up in a night and the characteristic grey sand hills of 
the oil fields, once covered with sage brush and inhabited only by the lonely coyote, became the 
scenes of hustling activity. Gushers became as common as California roses and the population 
went wild with excitement. But what was going to be done with the oil ? 

Perhaps it is no wonder that, in the excitement of production, no one seemed to think of a 
market. Up to this time practically all the oil produced in the State was fit only for fuel pur- 
poses. Untried and unprecedented in this capacity a market must be slowly built up. This was 
not to be accomplished in a day. One had to be convinced that it was better than coal, that it 
was much cheaper and that there was an unlimited supply. The first installations proved the first 
two of these requisite qualities, and subsequent development the latter. The result is that the 
use of coal for steam purposes has been practically supplanted by the use of oil by both the rail- 
roads and manufacturing industries of the State. This change of conditions, however, required 
a great deal of time, and, while the consumption of oil has been increased many millions of barrels 
each year, it will be readily seen that the production was also increasing at an alarming rate. Over- 
production followed and this condition, agitated by a petty competition of small producers, re- 
sulted in 1904 in the lowest price ever offered for California crude oil at the wells, 12 2-3 cents. 
The organization of the independent producers of Kern county followed. 

Two great oil companies, the Pacific Coast and Associated, have always controlled practi- 
cally the entire marketing of oil in California. It is true the Union Oil Company of California 
and, later, the National Oil & Transportation Company, have been strong factors, but the Pa- 
cific Coast and Associated companies have practically controlled the price as long as the small 
producer would keep out of the market. It was this annoying cutting of prices by a thousand 
and one of the "small fry" that brought the price down to where no company could afford to 
pump its wells. 

The Independent Oil Producers' Agency was promoted in Bakersfield during the month of 
August last. Answering a general call, representatives of practically every company effected by 
the cut in prices met at Bakersfield and agreed to shut down their wells until a better price 
could be secured. It would be useless to follow the course of the organization; suffice it is to 
say that, after more than five months of hard work at least 90 per cent of the independent product 
was tied up and soon after was all contracted to the Associated Oil Company at a price that, 
while not as high as looked for by some, will allow all to develop their properties and produce 
oil on a paying basis with every prospect of a material advance as soon as the present contract, 
embracing all the oil that can be produced for one year, shall have been filled. This hope for 
better prices is well founded. While it is true that the production of the State is rapidly in- 
creasing it is also true that consumption is gaining at the rate of many millions of barrels a year. 
and it is claimed, with good reason, that already consumption has not only reached but passed 
production and that stocks are being rapidly drawn upon. If this is true it will require the great- 
est effort on the part of every producing company to keep up the supply. The great gushers of 
Santa Maria and the rapid increase in Coalinga's production does not materially effect the fuel 
oil market, and, unless new fields are brought in or the limits of the known ones greatly ex- 
tended, we look for an entirely different condition of affairs than confronts us at the close of 
1904. 

Aided by the Independent Oil Producers' Agency the oil industry in California should take 
rapid strides for the better. Already the Agency is delivering oil from practically every lease 
within its fold and the long trains of tank cars leaving Kern daily attest to its strength. 

The conditions in the various fields of ths State are ably discussed in the following pages. 
Wishing our many readers a happy and prosperous New Year, we humbly submit the result of our 
feeble efforts. 



PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 



Past and Future of the IQern 
River Oil Field 



BY CLARENCE WILSON 




HE 



oil fields of Kern county or, 
more especially, those of Kern Riv- 



er, are classed among the largest in 
the world. nOly discovered a little 
more man four years ago, they now rank in point 
of production next to the famous fields of Baku, 
Russia. The beginning of the year 1905 will 
see over 900 producing wells in the Kern River 
field, representing an investment of many million 
dollars. The actual cost of drilling and completing 
a well in this field, averaging the cost of boiler 
plants, steam lines, and ail the necessary ma- 
chinery to run one of the leases, will be at the very 
lowest average figure, $5001) per well, and, tak- 
ing the total of y00 wells in the field, gives an 
actual cash outlay of $4,500,000, and this figure 
does not allow anything at all for the cost of the 
land, which in some instances, where the territory 
has been unusually productive, shows an actual 
outlay of over $5000 per acre. 

Where five years ago there was nothing but a 
desert, given over to the snakes and toads, with 
occasionally a band of sheep when the feed was 
good enough to support them, now is a busy 
scene with hundreds of derricks on every hill and 
canyon, while the entire territory, covering about 
four or five miles, is a perfect net-work of steam, 
gas, water and oil lines, totaling many hundred 
miles of pipe. From the immense pumping plant 
of the Standard Oil Company extends the pipe 
line to San Francisco — 300 miles of 8 inch pipe — 
which, when being operated, pours a continuous 
stream of the Kern county oil into its tanks at 
the Point Richmond end of the line. 

The shipments of oil by rail during the past 
year have been very near 200 tank-cars daily, and 
when one sees train after train load of oil cars 
shipped out of the field it hardly seems possible 
that so much oil could be pumped and shipped 
without exhausting the supply. So far there has 
been no noticeable falling off in the wells, except 
in instances where the wells have gone to water, 
the pipe collapsed or something has happened to 
the well to curtail the production. In cases where 
proper care has been taken of the wells and they 
have had full opportunity to produce to their full 
capacity the output has been almost up to what 
it was when the wells were first drilled in. 

Contrary to the conditions in nearly every oil 
field of importance that has been brought to the 
front as a producer of oil, there are no flowing 
wells in the Kern River field. Once in a while 
some of the wells will flow for a while without 
the aid of pumping, but in nearly all cases the 
wells have to be pumped. 

The production per well, when the number of 
wells pumping is considered, is not great, averag- 
ing only about 60 barrels to the well, but this 
production has been steady, without falling off, 
while the great gushers of Texas have spouted 
more in one day than the entire Kern River field 
produces, but now where were formerly the 40,- 
000 and 50,000 wells of Beaumont, in a great 
many cases at the present time, are only piles of 
rusting machinery, while the Kern River field 
keeps on its steady way. 

The throwing of this great quantity of oil on 
the western market, when the consumers were 
not prepared to use the amounts offered for sale 
resulted in the stagnation of the market and the 
consequent fall of price during the last year to 
such a figure that none but the largest companies 
and only those having the very best and most 
productive territory could produce the oil at the 
figure offered and make expenses on the leases. 

The Pacific Coast Oil Company (Standard) 
has shown its faith in the future market of fuel 
oil and during the past year has at no time let up 
on its work of constructing reservoirs for the 
storage of the surplus oil. Having put in some 
80 steel tanks with a capacity of 35,000 barrels 
each they very soon saw that they could never 



handle the oil at the rate they were able to erect 
the steel tanks and about that time some one dis- 
covered that all they had to do was to dig a hole 
in the ground, roof it, and there they had un- 
limited capacity for any amount of oil so long as 
the ground held out. This method of storing oil 
was something new in the experience of the oil 
men who had come from the Eastern oil fields, 
where the oil in most cases was strictly refining 
oil and not the fuel oil produced in the Kern 
River field. 

The Pacific Coast Oil Company has at the be- 
ginning of the year 1905 close to 9,000,000 bar- 
rels of oil stored in the field and has plans laid 
for the completion of reservoirs enough to care for 
another 8,000,000 or 10,000,000 barrels; at least 
this is the general report through the field. 

For miles and miles their immense reservoirs 
stretch out far as the eye can see and still be- 
yond the ocean of reservoirs now finished can be 
seen mile after mile of location stakes, showing 
where still other reservoirs are to be constructed. 
It is hard to realize what a great amount of 
money this enormous corporation has at its com- 
mand until one realizes that all of this work has 
been done, in addition to the pipe line, with com- 
paratively not a dollar coming in. Many oil 
men blame the Standard Oil Company for all of 
their misfortunes, but very few of the Eastern 
operators will be found who have hard words for 
this great corporation. There may be things they 
have done in the Eastern oil fields that could be 
criticized very harshly, but the Standard's treat- 
ment of the oil men and the Kern River oil field 
has always been in a spirit of fairness and good 
faith. It is true that several times during the 
year the Standard has refused to buy oil at any 
price, but this has been on account of their not 
having storage ready and the impossibility of se- 
curing men and teams to excavate the reservoirs. 
Much interest is taken by everyone connected 
with the oil business in the prospect for the life 
of the field. Many widely different theories are 
advanced every day. Some well informed men, 
and those who should have some idea of what they 
are talking about, claim the field cannot keep up 
its present production but for a short time, and 
contend that even now the daily average produc- 
tion of 50,000 barrels is the limit and never will 
be capable of increasing this production, no mat- 
ter how many more wells are drilled. 

Others say the only limit to the production is 
the number of new wells that may be put down ; 
that the new wells will add their increase to the 
production already developed, while the old wells 
will still continue to produce at the same rate 
as they have in the past. One of the signs that 
seem to point to the failing of the field is the 
lowering of the oil in the wells. In wells where 
formerly the oil stood within a few hundred feet 
of the surface, now the oil level in the same well 
is 300 or 400 feet lower down. Some practical 
men claim the entire field is like one immense 
tank, and the wells will not give out or decrease 
in their production until the entire amount of oil 
is very nearly exhausted and then all over the 
field wells will fall off at the same rate until the 
output is very light. 

The supporters of this theory claim the oil 
travels much farther through the sand than it is 
given credit with doing; that while the general 
opinion is that a well does not drain territory 
farther away than 400 or 500 feet yet the actual 
conditions are such that one well will drain the 
sand for a much longer distance than this and 
when wells are put down in what is supposed to 
be the best part of the field and that which has 
no drainage to speak of when the wells are drilled 
in, it will be found that the sand in those parts of 
the field will have been drained by wells at such a 
distance that no account was taken of their effect- 
ing that territory. Even those who claim a com- 
parative early failure of the field cannot but give 
many million more barrels of oil before the field 



shows any noticeable decline in production. 

At the beginning of the present year many good 
oil men prophesied that by the end of the year the 
production would have fallen off to an alarming 
extent, but the production of the year has not 
shown any great decline and it is thought that a 
close estimate of the field will show more oil 
produced during the year of 1904 than that of 
1903. 

The past year has been one of much depression. 
Very few new wells have been drilled, the price 
of oil has been at such a low figure there has 
been no incentive for the development of any 
more production. 

But for the companies like the Peerless, the 
Imperial and Thirty-Three and a few others, 
who, by the nature of their contracts and leases, 
have been forced to drill new wells, the past year 
would have seen very little new work in the 
Kern River field. 

THE WATER SITUATION. 

Early in the beginning of the year the water 
problem appeared to have assumed serious propor- 
tions. Large leases like the Petroleum Develop- 
ment Company and several other large properties 
had been having considerable trouble on account 
of wells going to water and ceasing to produce oil. 
The water seems to be advancing over the field at 
a steady rate and some thought the many unsuc- 
cessful attempts that had been made to stop its 
progress argued ill for the life of the field. Dur- 
ing the year many thousands of dollars have been 
spent by the different companies in combating 
this evil and, while all danger is not past, yet 
from the many experiments that have been tried 
and the many successful attempts a great amount 
of good has come. On the Green & Whittier 
properties of the Associated, where several of the 
wells were on water and refused to pump oil, 
after many weary months of tedious and costly 
work success had finally rewarded them, and wells 
are now pumping oil that before produced nothing 
but water. 

Many other large leases throughout the field 
have had more or less trouble with the water 
question, among them the West Shore, Monte 
Cristo, Peerless and others. Some of these com- 
panies have had first class success in dealing with 
the problem and think they have finally found the 
correct way to handle the great amount of water 
that comes into the sands. Others have not been 
so successful, but in handling the water question 
any thing that is learned on one lease is freely 
divulged to others that may be troubled with like 
conditions. By this means of working it is hoped 
that the once dangerous question of the water 
will be settled so that a comparatively small loss 
of production will result therefrom. 

The present struggle of the independent pro- 
ducers of this field to form some sort of a com- 
bination whereby they could secure a price for 
the oil that would warrant a profit on the devel- 
opment work has been watched with much inter- 
est by every one connected with the oil business. 
Early in the summer it was plainly seen that un- 
less some sort of a combination was formed, or 
some steps taken to protect the market, nothing 
but financial ruin was left for the large number 
of small operators in the field ; those who had no 
long time contracts at a fair price or did not have 
enough capital to develop the leases and store their 
oil while waiting for the market to advance. 

When the Pacific Coast Oil Company cut the 
price of spot oil to 11 2-3 cents per barrel, it was 
at once realized that something had to be done 
or they might as well get out of the oil business 
and lose the capital invested in it. 

At the former price of 15 cents there was but 
little profit in the production of oil. Very few 
of the companies could produce oil at this figure, 
and even if they were able to produce and make 
some returns on the actual expenses of running 
the leases there would Be nothing left to get the 
original investment back, and in a business where 
the limit of profitable development is from five 
to ten years, a mere return on the running ex- 
pense is not enough. Therefore the independent 
producers of Kern county formed the "Independ- 
ent Producers' Agency." This organization re- 
sulted in practically all of the oil produced in 
the Kern field being controlled by three large 
companies. 

The Associated Oil Company produces and se- 



PACIFIC OIL RFPORTFR 



n tracts about 15,000 barrels 
the general accepted 

-timers 

to the 

companies holding lone time contracts with this 
corporation, ami the greater part of this I 
barrels is stored by the Pacific Coast Oil Com- 
be, as the corporation docs 
mpete. to any great extent, in the fuel oil 
market. About 16,000 barrels daily is sold to the 
:cnt companies in amounts 
runnin thousand barrels daily down 

to a few hundred. Practically all of the remain- 
der of the production of the field, estimated at 
from 20,000 to rrels daily, is in the 

bands of the Independent Agency. The Agency 

has made a contract with the Associated Oil Com- 
pany for the entire amount. 

The entire production of the Kern river oil 
field is in such shape that the consumer wanting 
any large amount of oil will be forced to make 
his contract with one of the large companies. 

I'ndoiihtcdly the wish of the majority of the 
independents is that they keep out of the market- 
in,' of oil and confine themselves to the produc- 
tion thereof, as the necessary storage, cars, tanks, 



of new fields over the State and the brin^ 
of large wells ninning up into the thousa 
barrels in daily production 
output of Kern ri\er so much - ighl 
pected. All the oil produced in the Kern river 
field is of heavy gravity; much heavier than the 
Santa Maria, or even the Coalinga oil. and from 
the many experiments the consumers of fuel oil 
have made during the past four years, it has 
been fully demonstrated that the heavier grades 
or oil give the most satisfactory results for fuel. 
The tame thing applies to the use of oil for roads, 

of which many thousand barrels are used every 
year, and the consumption for this particular pur- 
pose increases and will continue to increase, until 
the price gets a great ileal higher than it is at the 
present time. 

While the demand is great for the lighter oils 
used for refining, and there seems to be practi- 
cally an unlimited market for the higher grades 
of oil. yet for the heavy fuel oils none of the other 
fields have ever been able to produce just the right 
oil that gives the most economical and satisfac- 
tory residt for fuel purposes. In this respect 
Kern oil stands par excellence. 

The Kern river operators realize that unless 
a fair profit can he made while the production is 
great it will he useless to try and get even when 



•>f the que hat of 

the man who produce! the oil. The 

■ taken into a,v mnt 

the price of oil is lower than i 

Id he p.n in 

merely to help out the producer when he is able 
to buy from some one at a much lower price' 
■ has been heard from any 
of the large consumers about the prosopal to ad- 
vance oil to 2^ cents. Every one of them seems 
perfectly willing t< pay this price just as 
as no other producer can he found who will sell 
for less. 

To sum up the past of the Kern river oil field 
it must he remembered that the first develop- 
ment work was done during a period of "boom." 
- were inflated to far beyond their actual 
value, with hundreds of schemes and devices to 
sell stock to the unsuspecting eastern public as 
well as western investor. For the most part 
these fake concerns were founded on properties 
that cither had no actual or developed standing, 
or were so far our of the line of development 
that it was one chance in a thousand if they 
would ever he worth anything at all. 

During the boom times all that seemed neces- 
sary to float the stock of an oil company was to 



>. 




A General View of the Kernl River Field. 



vessels and other expenses that would be caused 
by their appearance in the markets as competi- 
tors of both the Standard and Associated would 
be very heavy and, as the organization was only 
formed to protect the producer, the most of 
them do not want to enter the markets as dis- 
tributors of oil unless they are forced into it. 
They would much prefer making a contract at 
a reasonable price with one of the others for their 
entire production and confine themselves strictly 
to the production of oil. 

A price of 18 cents per barrel at the wells is 
conceded to be the lowest the operators should 
be asked to take. While some of the companies 
can pay large dividends at this price the great 
majority of them cannot make more than a fair 
profit on their investment. To take the average 
of all the different companies in the Independent 
Agency. 18 cents is thought to be as low as they 
could afford to make a contract for except for a 
very short time. With the price of oil raised 
to 18 cents or better the future prospect for the 
oil industry in Kern county may be said to be 
very encouraging. With this or a better price 
received for the product the oil business will 
show some returns for the money invested, but 
unless something is done to advance the price 
those having large interests in the field will be 
very much disheartened and consider an invest- 
ment in the oil business a very bad one. 

The best thing that can be said for the future 
of the Kern county fields is that the discovery 



the production has been cut in half, even if the 
price shall have advanced some, for the addi- 
tional expense of drilling new wells will still re- 
main the same and cost of running leases and 
pumping wells cannot be curtailed more than they 
are at the present time. The only way out of 
the difficulty is to get a better price while the 
wells are producing well and the consumer can 
afford to pay the additional cost. 

No consumer denies the fact that he could pay 
a price of SO cents per barrel at the wells and 
still have a large saving over the cost of using 
coal as a fuel, but it is not a characteristic trait 
of human nature to pay more for an article than 
it can be bought for, and the consumer will not 
pay the producer any more than IS cents for his 
oil, long as the small producer can be found will- 
ing to sell oil at any price in order to get ready 
money for the development of the lease and pay- 
ment of running expenses. W T ith all the smaller 
companies within the fold of the Independent 
Agency it is hoped to do away with the throat- 
cutting way of going after small contracts that 
has been prevalent among the smaller producers 
of oil during the past two years, and in order 
to secure any contracts whatever, the larger 
companies, namely, the Pacific Coast Oil Com- 
pany and Associated, have been forced to fight 
the little men with their own weapons of a cut 
price. 

The so-called "conspiracy" to advance the price 
of oil is a misnomer. There is a tendency to 



get out a prospectus and have some land in Kern 
county; it made very little difference where, and 
the unsuspecting public seemed to think the road 
to riches had opened up before their eyes and 
that all that was required would be to send a few 
dollars to Bakersfield, Cal., and in a short time 
receive thousands back from some phenomenal 
gusher. 

Even to this day many people in the oil busi- 
ness are continually receiving inquiries from east- 
ern people about the location and prospects of 
some oil company that has been defunct for many 
months, and upon investigation is found to be 
miles and miles away from even the least prom- 
ising oil territory. 

During this time the genuine oil men were 
present in large numbers, but, accustomed as he 
was to not going into territory until there was 
some slight prospect of oil, they, in the most of 
cases, held back and would not associate them- 
selves with the numberless wildcat schemes. With 
the large number of w-ells being put down in the 
actual oil territory of Kern river it only took 
a short time for the field to produce much more 
oil than the entire western coast could by any 
means handle. Comparatively little fuel oil had 
been used up to this time. Then came the in- 
evitable era of hard times. Plenty of oil, but 
no sale for it. The eastern investor commenced 
to clamor for the promised dividends and the fes- 
tive promoter folded his tent and hied himself 



PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 



\J 



to more promising fields for his questionable oper- 
ations. 

About this time with a large amount of oil 
being produced, no sale and no storage, the As- 
sociated Oil Company had its birth. In regard 
to the Associated Oil Company whether it has 
been a factor for good or evil in the oil business 
of Kern county may be left to the individual 
opinion of those having interests with it, or 
properties that have been merged into it. Like 
all large corporations, it has many enemies, like- 
wise many friends, but it is not the purpose of 
this article to express any opinion as to the good 
or evil of anything, but simply to give a state- 
ment of the oil business in the Kern river field, 
its past, present, and how the future looks from 
the present indications. 

If all the oil companies in the field had gone 
into the Associated when it was formed there is 
no doubt but that the oil business would have 
been on a much firmer basis than it has been dur- 
ing the year of 1904, but there remained enough 
companies outside of and independent of the As- 
sociated to produce and control much more oil 
than it did, hence the times of hustling to sell 
oil at any price. It is claimed the Associated 
cut the price of contracts in order to force the out- 
side companies into the fold. Others claim the 
outsider cut the price until both the Pacific Coast 
Oil Company and Associated were forced, 
against their- wishes, to make the lower prices 
in order to get any sale for the oil at all. 

During this time the production was increas- 
ing much faster than the demand, and with nu- 
merous companies with surplus oil on hand and 
no surplus money in the treasury to pay bills the 
price steadily declined. 

The production of the Kern river field for the 
year of 1903 was estimated at about 16,300,000 



barrels. For the year of 1904 it will go close 
to 17,500,000 barrels. Whether the production 
will ever increase is a much discussed ques- 
tion, but the general opinion seems to be that 
no large increase is looked for. There is a large 
amount of territory that has not been drilled, 
but the general idea prevails that unless much 
more drilling is done than has been during the 
past year the production may be expected to show 
a gradual decline from this time on. 

Many oil men through the field claim the oil 
produced during the last four months of the year 
will not equal by several thousand barrels per 
month the amount produced during the early 
part of the year. Even should the production 
have declined for the last few months the stop- 
ping of practically all drilling during the or- 
ganization of the Independent Producers' Agency 
would account for this. As a whole the produc- 
tion will show a gradual decline unless more wells 
are brought in to take the place of natural loss 
of production. 

The future of the Kern county field, while 
not showing any signs of great improvement, 
may be said to look better than it has for some 
years past. With the practical assurance that the 
Independent Agency has contracted for all of its 
oil, and with the generally accepted report that 
the Associated Oil Company's production is just 
about equaled by its contracts, the prospect for 
the oil companies of the Kern river field to pull 
themselves out of the unprofitable business they 
have been engaged in for the last two years and 
start on an era of better times looks very en- 
couraging. No very high price is looked for, but 
even at the price of 25 cents a barrel, which is 
confidently expected by the majority of the oper- 
ators, the oil business in the Kern river field would 
be on a much more profitable basis than at any 
time during the past three years. 
. ./ 



Sunset* Midway Oil Field and 

Its Future 



BY HOA[. C. Jl. BARLOW 




HE oil industry has passed through 
its period of depression that always 
follows in the wake of such won- 
derful discoveries as the past few 
years have witnessed in the State of California. 
The best fuel in the world, it was untried and 
without a market. After a few short years it 
has become the recognized fuel of the Pacific 
slope and is daily becoming more and more in 
demand. The ships of the Pacific ocean have 
tested it and are adopting it. The railroads now 
consume 10,000,000 barrels per year and are 
needing more every month. Manufacturers con- 
sume millions of barrels and are just beginning 
to use oil as fuel. The demand today is equal 
to the supply and the year of 1905 will be a 
busy one for the drill and drillers who will have 
to increase the supply that must be forthcoming. 
The day is coming fast when oil will be King 
among the products of our State. Stocks in oil 
companies are again becoming of value and in- 
vestors who are wise will hold certificates in 
companies that are legitimate investments. It 
is to be regretted, but well known of all men, 
that the greatest curse that the oil business has 
had to contend with has been the illegitimate oil 
company which was organized to catch the un- 
wary. Thank the powers that be, they have 
been driven out of business almost entirely and 
today there is no cleaner and better investment 
than oil stocks. These bright and better condi- 
tions apply to the great Sunset-Midway field, 
as well as all other fields in the State. 

These two oil fields, extending as they do, 
from the village of Sunset on the southeast, locat- 
ed on section 13, 11, 24, M. D., B. & M., north- 
westerly for a distance of fifteen miles to the 
Chanslor and Canfield holdings on section 6, 



32, 23, M. D., B & M., cover one of the most 
extensive pieces of proven oil land in the State 
of California. One may be safe in saying that 
there is only one field in the State that exceeds 
this field in proven area; that is the Santa Maria 
field, and its extent is as yet undetermined. 

Sunset-Midway will average one mile in width 
and embraces fifteen square miles of territory. 
While the two fields are one continuous oil belt, 
yet their product is not at all similar, Sunset field 
producing oil of from 11 to 14 gravity, and from 
which the purest asphaltum in the world is made, 
and has been for the past twenty years by the 
firm of Jewett and Blodgett, and Midway, which 
has the lightest oil in Kern County, some of its 
wells yielding as high as 24 gravity oil. 



It will give a reader a better idea of the fields 
and their future if I briefly mention the com- 
panies operating and the number of wells that 
each has. It must be born in mind that many 
of the companies owning several hundreds of 
acres of oil land, only have a few wells on the 
same, as there has been no facilities in the field 
to market the product. In the Sunset field we 
have the "Navajo" with two wells and a re- 
finery; "Western Minerals," two; "Anna L.," 
one; "Sunset Czar," one; "California Consoli- 
dated Oil Fields Company," twenty-seven, and 
a refinery; "Queen," one; "Crown," one; "St. 
Paul-Sunset," one; "Diamond," three; "Lion," 
two; "Golden West," one; "Tiger," one; "Sun- 
set-Center," four; "Kern-Sunset Oil and De- 
velopment Company," one ; "Fulton," six ; "Bar- 
rett," one; "Federal Crude," four; "Adeline," 
four; "Arcola-Extension," one; "Areola," three; 
"Euclid," one; "Sanford-€anger," two; "Me- 
dina," two; "Tremont," three; "Obispo," two; 
"Copper Consolidated," two; "Monarch," five; 
"Occidental," three; "El Rey," one; "United 
Crude," two; "Transport," two; "Petroleum De- 
velopment," one; "Pacific," two; "J., B. & B.," 



four; "Reynolds," two; "Jewett Oil Company," 
one; "Pawtuxent," one; "California Fortune," 
four; "Nanticoke," one; "Beaver," three; "Gold- 
en West," one; "Operators," three; "Lucky 
Boy," one. This makes a total of 114, 
over 30 per cent of them flowing wells. One 
great feature of this field is its flowing wells, in 
which respect it surpasses any other field in the 
State. In going over the field recently I visited 
the last well just completed by the Adeline Oil 
Company. It is producing about 300 barrels per 
day of settled oil and this is flowing between the 
95^ casing and 7-inch drive pipe; the drive pipe 
is kept full of water and they dare not take this 
out until they have completed a large reservoir 
now being constructed. While the drive pipe 
has settled the last 111 feet into the oil sands, 
the tools have not been within 100 feet of the 
bottom of the well. The pipe is still settling 
and iwent down four feet the day I was at the 
well. This will give you some idea of the rich- 
ness of the oil sands in this field. 

The Sunset field, now having railroad facil- 
ities and many of the companies having their own 
pipe lines and loading racks, the coming year 
will record large shipments from this field. Cali- 
fornia, according to a late bulletin, has 2223 
miles of oiled road in the country and 552 miles 
of oiled streets in the cities. The outlook for 
the year 1905 is that the mileage both. in roads 
and streets will be increased to twice that amount. 
A first-class oiled road is the best and cheapest 
road in the world. The low gravity oil of the 
Sunset field is especially adapted for this use, and 
the present capacity of the field will be taxed to 
its utmost to supply the demand for the coming 
year. 



The Midway field, not having transportation, 
is as yet only slightly developed. And while the 
number of companies operating and the number 
of wells completed, is as yet small, the territory 
proven exceeds that of any field in the county. 
With the upward movement in oil will come 
the demand for the light gravity oil of this field, 
and there is no doubt the coming year will see 
ample facilities in the field, both by railroad and 
pipe lines. Commencing at the southeastern end 
of the field, we have the "Areata," with one 
well; "New Richmond," one; "Croesus," one; 
"Section Twenty-five Oil Company," one ; "Par- 
aflfine," one; "Altoona-Midway," one; 'Sunset 
Coast," one; "Mascot," four; "Mt. Diablo Oil 
and Development Companv," three; "Mountain 
Boy," two; "Producers' Oil Company, Guaran- 
teed," two; "Bay City," one; "Burke," one; 
"Casa," one; "Internos," one; "Dayton," one; 
"Sioux," one; "Mitchell Crude," one; "Midway 
of Oregon," three ; "Oriental," one ; "Chanslor 
and Canfield," eighteen, making a total of forty- 
seven. 

There being no way of marketing the oil of 
this field no correct estimate can be placed on 
the capacity of the wells, but sufficient 
is known to insure investors that the yield 
of the wells in the Midway field, when they be- 
gin to do business, will be found satisfactory. 
Many of them will be found in the same class 
as the "Shamrock" of McKittrick, that yielded 
from 1500 to 1600 barrels per day for two years, 
and is now doing over 500 barrels per day. 

The Sunset-Midway field is fortunate in one 
respect. The work of opening this field has been 
conducted by men of experience in the oil busi- 
ness ; oil men, in fact, and not men who were 
new to the business. It was not opened by the 
speculator who simply wanted to unload stock 
on the public, but by men who are now holding 
the ground that they have proven and awaiting 
facilities to handle the oil that they knew they 
would get when they commenced to drill. These 
fields are the best marked fields, geologically 
speaking, of any in the State. As a result all 
work was performed in a proper manner. Wells 
were drilled by men of experience and no holes 
were abandoned to work ruin on surrounding 
properties. The entire formation of these West 
Side fields is that of an ideal oil field. There 
are practically no water sands and this increases 
the desirability of the field as regards the in- 
vesting public. Sunset-Midway has a great fu- 
ture and will become prominent as a producer 
in the near future. 



V 



IF1C (Ml 



A Years Development in the 
Southern Oil Fields 



L. C. BLAKESLEE 




III •• r ; -ist drawn-, 
hern an uneventful one 
£ the fields south of the Tehachapi 

•nccrned. Whilr therr has been 
little development w ill the 

time in thr nothing lias happened 

to break the monotony of the situation. I ought, 
probably, to except the Los Angela field, as con- 
siderable excitement was caused in the closing 
months of the year In the bringing in of several 
immense wells in the western extension. The ef- 
fect, however. «as quite the reverse of a boom in 
that section. One companj controls most of the 
productive tem'torj so far developed, and the 
result of these large wells was simply to flood 
the market and depress prices to a point not known 
before in Los Annies. 

The fact of the matter is. the market in the 
entire southern part of the State is demoralized at 
the present time. The Pacific Coast Oil Com- 
pany ( Standard), w hich lias, until within a month 
or two, been buying oil in all the southern fields 
and paying a fair price for it. has discontinued 
its purchases in the majority of cases, and is 
making no otters for oil of any character. The 
reason for this policy is that the P. C. O. Co., 
being a marketing agency and not a producer, can 



not warrant this condition of affairs, and the low- 
price must be attributed to quarrels and manipu 
rather than to overproduction, for what- 

the State will show as a whole there is err 

tainl) no overproduction in the southern lirl.ls. 
nsidered independently, 
but since the reduction in the rate on oil from 
Bakersfield to Los Angeles and other southern 
points, it must he acknowledged that Kem river 
oil has injured to some extent the southern mar- 
kets; and at Whittier, probably most noticeably, 
although the output has not increased, sti 
top of the ground have been accumulating until 
there is not less than 150,000 barrels in st< 
in that field at the present time. 

So it is impossible to consider the southern 
fields entirely separate from those in the north. 
The Associated Oil Co. and the Pacific 
Oil Co. are both seeking markets in the south 
for their Kern river oil. and are finding them, 
with the result that local producers are swamped 
in their own oil. 

In Ventura county and as far north as Sum- 
merland the Associated has heen offering Kern 
river oil, constantly pounding down the price of 
the local product until it has well nigh shut 
down the wells in these sections. 

The end of this business, however, promises to 



nd harapei 

southern fields, the blow n 

1 and the 
dropped in [ed IS 

cent oil at Bakersfield, with dS cents I 
added, or 53 cents. Tin's w,,s a big i 

■""' i penally as the consumer » 

complaining and was. in tact, getting fuel on a 
basis ot about $2.50 per ton for coal. Thi 
ducer was not doing am too well, but was mak- 
ing a fairly descent profit at these pi 

old production. Even these prices, however, not 
warranting him in drilling new wells. This 
ceasing of new work, of course, had the effi 
reducing the pro most of the wells in 

the city field are getting old and many are "on 
their last legs" so to -pea 1 ,. l!,,t „„ sooner had 
the production declined to a point which promised 
an advance in price, than reports he 
brought in from the "west end" of big strikes 
there, and, one alter another, the three 01 
gushers were brought in until it looked as if 
there were no ne :d oi ield at all. 

production began to roll up again imtil in De- 
cember oil was actually sold in some instances at 
20 cents per barrel. Aside from the Salt Lake 
Oil Co., Clark & Sherman, P. F. Schoemacher, 
and A. F. Gilmore are now operating in the west 
end and are meeting with gratifying success, so 
far as big wells are concerned. The present pro- 
duction of this western district is amply sufficient 
to supply the local market. What it will he 
capable of doing six months from now it is diffi- 




In the Los Angeles City Oil Field. 



not compete with every independent company pro- 
ducing oil. The P. C. O. is obliged to buy at a 
price that will enable it to make a fair profit 
when it sells, but it can not do this as long as 
the producer makes the same price to the P. C. 
( ). as he does to the consumer. This is a reason- 
able explanation and accounts satisfactorily for the 
present policy of the Pacific Coast Oil Company. 
When the producer gets readv to market his oil 
through a common agency, fair prices will obtain, 
and probably not until then, as the consumer will 
continue to take advantage of every conflict be- 
tween those directly interested in the production 
and marketing of the oil, to pound down the price 
to a minimum, and no one is to blame but the 
producers themselves. So much with reference to 
existing conditions. 

Field operations during the past year will not 
be found to have increased production any. The 
natural decline in old wells will offset any new 
wells brought in. In some of the fields there has 
been an actual decline in production and in none 
an increase, unless it is the Los Angeles field, but 
even here the shrinkage in the old city field has 
been very large and may almost balance the new- 
production in the west end, as most of the large 
wells arrived very late in the year. The con- 
sumption has probably increased slightly during 
the year. Oil is worth as much for fuel now as 
it has been any time during the year, and yet the 
consumer is getting his fuel for from 25 to 50 
per cent less than he was a year ago. Field con- 
ditions, in the southern districts at least, do 



be near, owing to the success 1 of the in- 
dependent movement in the Kern River district. 
If the new organization has as much oil tied up 
as report has it, the Associated Oil Co. would 
have been pinched to fill its contracts with- 
out it. If the independents control 430,000 bar- 
rels per month that will certainly greatly help 
the Associated Oil Company, as it is well known 
this concern does not produce nearly enough oil 
to fill its contracts and is constantly buying. The 
deal the Associated has made with the Salt Lake 
Oil Co. in the western Los Angeles field has 
without doubt been a great offset to any 
curtailment of supply in the Kern River field, as 
this Salt Lake district, so called, is capable now of 
producing 150,000 barrels per month, and, as un- 
der the new arrangement, new work is to be 
pushed as vigorously as six strings of tools can 
do it, indications point to a big increase in the 
output. 

It may be of interest to note the development 
in the various southern fields separately and 
while I am talking about the Los Angeles field, 
might as well begin there. 

LOS ANGELES OIL FIELD. 

"There is nothing to it" but Salt Lake Oil 
Co., or, more properly, Amalgamated Oil Co., as 
that is the name of the new concern composed 
of the Salt Lake Oil Company and several others 
associated with it: the entire. Amalgamated Oil 
Co., being a part of the Associated Oil Co., or- 
ganized to handle the business of the Associated 
south of the Tehachapi. 



cult to foresee as the limits of the pool have not 
\ et been defined. Under the agreement of con- 
solidation the Salt Lake Oil Co., sold to the 
Amalgamated Oil Co., one million barrels of 
oil at 25 cents per barrel. This is a ridicuously 
low price, but with wells which flow from 800 
to 1500 barrels per day, the cost of production is 
rather small. At all events this sale established 
the price and the small producer has good reason 
for feeling blue. 

The production of the Los Angeles field may 
be placed at about 1,200,000 barrels for the year 
just closed. This production may appear small in 
view of what has heen said about the Salt Lake 
gushers, etc., but it must he remembered that 
these wells were not brought in until way late 
in the year and do not count in the year's average, 
except to make up for the big decline in the city 
field proper. If the western field does what >': 
at present promises next year may show a trem- 
endous increase. There are experts, however, 
who say that the western field is only a pool and 
will not show the staying qualities that w 
class it with a great field like Santa Maria or the 
Kern River. That is an optimistic view of the 
case, however, as no one really knows ; and tin 
present effect of the "pool" on Los Angeles oil 
men is one of depression. 

W IIITTIER FIELD. 

At Whittier, as I have noted above, stocks have 
beei accumulating tor some time past, and two 
of the largest operating companies in the field 
have decided to stop new work. Indeed, the 



PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 



Murphy Oil Company has shut down every drill- 
ing well and is only pumping part of the wells 
already completed. Considering the fact that six 
months ago this company was running six strings 
of tools this means much to the field. The com- 
pany has three 35,000-barrel tanks and all are 
full of oil. 

The Central Oil Company, which was also 
running six strings of tools up to three months 
ago, has "laid up" three of them and will within 
60 days be shut down on new work entirely unless 
conditions improve. This company has, during 
the past year, brought in three good wells and 
has had fair success in disposing of the product, 
but its 30,000-barrel storage tanks at Los Neitos 
are nearly full at present. 

The Warner, Whittier Crude, Turner, Home, 
Whittier-Fillmore and Fidelity are the only other 
operating companies at present in the field. The 
last named company completed two good wells 
during the year, as did also the Turner ; and the 
Whittier-Fillmore finish one. This entire group 
of companies sell their product to the Union Oil 
Company, which has a pump station in the field. 

As noted elsewhere, Whittier has suffered in 
common with the other southern fields, on ac- 
count of the reduced hauling rates on Kern River 
oil. The production of the field has probably re- 
mained about stationery for the year. That is, 
it will show no increase over last year. While 
there has been some drilling on the outskirts of 
the field, nothing has been developed to extend 



production in its Kern River wells, due to water, 
it increased the drilling wells at Olinda until 
there were eleven strings of tools at work. Of 
course whatever oil this company produces it uses 
itself and thus it is practically off the market. 
Graham & Loftus, Chas. Victor Hall, the Co- 
lumbia, Puente & Fullerton Oil companies are 
also drilling now, and have been throughout the 
entire year. Chas. V. Hall has brought in two 
fine wells, Graham & Loftus finished up two in 
the light oil belt, and the Columbia completed one. 
The Puente Oil Company, which made a deal 
■vith the Columbia about a year ago, whereby the 
Puente Oil Company absorbed all the light oil 
territory owned by the Columbia, is one of the 
most active concerns in the field at present, and 
has completed four or five good light oil wells 
during the year. This concern owns its own re- 
finery at Chino and utilizes its own production 
for the manufacture of gasolene, kerosene and 
distillates. 

Nothing has happened in the Fullerton field 
that would indicate that the boundaries extend in 
any direction unless perhaps to the southeast, 
where the Iowa Company has been drilling for the 
past two or three years. Persistence appears to 
have been rewarded in this instance as in No- 
vember at about 3200 feet the drill struck an oil 
sand which promises a good well. Work is still 
progressing and nothing has been determined, but 
it looks as if the field might be extended in this 
direction about a mile. The Rob Roy Oil Com- 



with this group also. 

In the neighborhood of Peru and Santa Paula 
will be found the largest fields, although along 
the same range of hills will be found groups of 
wells at Buckhorn, Bardsdale, Filmore and other 
points. Near Piru, the Torry Canyon wells, be- 
longing to the Union Oil Company, are located. 
No drilling has been done here, however, for the 
past year, as the Union Oil Company has been 
devoting its attention to larger game at Santa 
Maria and Lompoc. At Piru also is located 
the Modello Oil Company and the Piru Oil and 
Land Company. The former has a good produc- 
ing property and runs one string of tools continu- 
ously. The Piru Company ceased all work on its 
property several months ago. 

Near Santa Paula, the Union, Empire and half 
a dozen other companies are aperating, but none 
with the exception of the Empire and C. A. Bur- 
rows, have done any drilling. The Empire Oil 
Company finished two wells but shut down on 
new work in September, when their contract with 
the Standard expired, and the latter refused to re- 
new it except at a ij percent, reduction in the 
price of its oil. 

The hills through Ventura county are full of 
oil, but there has been during the past year ab- 
solutely no inducement to prospect for it and the 
oil is still stored in the everlasting hills, where it 
ought to remain until the wants of mankind make 
it worth drilling for. 

Newhall is as dead as it is possible to be. There 




Submarine Wells at Summerland, a Declining Field. 



the producing area. The Commonwealth Oil 
Company, which was drilling about two or three 
miles to the northwest of present developments 
gave up the ghost about two months ago and in 
dying showed there was no oil in that direction. 
In the opposite direction the Murphy Oil Com- 
pany drilled a wild cat in the Coyote hills, several 
miles east, to a depth of 3500 feet and found 
nothing. This well was abandoned last month. 
And "nothing doing" is the situation at Whit- 
tier. 

The probable production for the year for this 
field was about 692,000 barrels. The average 
price was about 60 cents per barrel. 

While the Whittier field has been and is a very 
prolific little field, considering its area, it has 
probably seen its best days. It is not likely that 
the limits of the field will be extended to any ex- 
tent, unless such improved methods of drilling are 
adopted, as will enable the operator to go deeper 
than any has so far been drilled. There are some 
who contended, and with reason, that the Whit- 
tier hills, extending for miles, contain oil. They 
no doubt do, but no one has yet reached it in any 
commercial quantity. 

THE FULLERTON FIELD. 

The Fullerton field includes properly what is 
known as the Olinda field and extends to the 
west as far as Brea Canyon. There are two 
grades of oil found in this field — a high grade 
light oil, and the common heavy product. 

This field is where the Santa Fe gets its main 
supply for its own use and has had for two or 
three years several strings of tools at work. Early 
in the year just closed, owing to the great loss in 



pany put a damper on investigation toward the 
east by abandoning its test hole at about 2000 
feet. The Olinda Crude Oil Company, after 
spending over $700,000 in drilling for oil, ex- 
tending over a period of four years, has decided 
to quit, and last month were engaged in pulling 
the casing from the last failure. 

At Brea Canyon, the opposite or western ex- 
tremity of the field the Brea Canyon and the 
Union Oil companies are the only concerns oper- 
ating. 

The field in this direction, in all probability, 
extends as far as the Puente Oil field, where the 
company of that name has been operating for ten 
years or more. This should be probably included 
in the Fullerton field, but as all new work has 
been suspended for a year past, no importance at- 
taches to it. The reason for the shut down is that 
the company has for the year been devoting its 
energies to its Olinda property as mentioned 
above. 

The output for the Fullerton field for the year 
was approximately 1,500,000 barrels, of which 
about 200,000 barrels was . the light product. 
Most of the oil was sold and there is very little 
if any surplus. The light oil brought an average 
price of about 60 cents per barrel and the heavy 
oil about 40 cents. 

VENTURA COUNTY. 

While there are probably a dozen fields in this 
country, they are none of them very pretentious, 
ande are very widely scattered, so may be classed 
under one head. The Newhall field, while in 
Los Angeles county, ought properly to be classed 



is no drilling and has been none during the year. 
One exception should be noted. The Pacific 
Coast Oil Company is at work on what it pro- 
poses shall be a deep hole, on its property in Pico 
Canyon. It is in the nature of a test well, and 
has been drilling for three months. The present 
depth is about 1800 feet. 

The Sulphur Mountain Petroleum Company 
is drilling on its second well on Sulphur Mount- 
tain, north of Santa Paula. It will doubtless be 
a fair producer, as is No. 1. 

The output during the past year for the Ven- 
tura county fields was probably 500,000 barrels. 
Ventura produces a high grade of oil in most of 
its fields, and a fair price has been received for it 
until within the past two or three months. The 
average price was about 75 cents per barrel. 

SUMMARY. 

Thus it will be seen that although the produc- 
tion of the southern fields has not materially in- 
creased during the year, the price of oil has stead- 
ily declined to a point where it is not profitable to 
drill for it. This condition of affairs is accounted 
for by the fact that northern oil has come into 
tiiese markets owing to the reduced cost of trans- 
portation and flooded them. 

As I have remarked above, if the oil men hope 
for any immediate relief in connection with the 
business they should permit some one concern, 
large enough and strong enough, to market their 
oil for them. Under the present system they are 
cutting each other's throats and none is receiving 
any benefit. 



[FIC OIL REPORTER 



Sargent's Estate Oil Field 




ite oil district, which 
nder lease to d .-. ille 

•i the southern 
rnd (it Santa I aunty. It 

compr 

have been in evidence in this district from early 
i settler" who "knew when 
they appeared" has never Seen found by this gen- 
ii. Between these springs, and embracing 
I at least Si Ml acres, the ground is 
■ I with the seepage from a subterranean 
oil deposit. The oil bubbles up through the 
ground and tonus mound-like deposits of thick 
oil or asphalt around its boiling springs. Similar 
springs and oil showings are on the Van Ee 
rancho (adjoining territory) at Chittenden. 

Thirty years ago the Sargent "tar springs" 
district was worked for asphalt and the product 



bearing sand, but tii indications and 

an immen 
deposit near at hand that the company did not 
talter in its efforts to strike the point where pro- 
duction could be assured, feeling confident that 

its labors would In- rewarded with SUCCeSS, an. I 
the present oil showing of the Sargent I 
territory is indisputable evidence that the W.it- 
SOnville Oil Company has a strong production 
ot oil from the wells which have been drilled, 
and also a splendid prospect for a largely in- 
creased production when more wells have been 
drilled. The field is proven, the location of the 
oil deposit is established, and all that remains 
to lie done to vast!} increase the output of the 
Watsonville < >il Company's territory is to drill 
more wells. 

1 he Watsonville ( )il Company was organized 
In a huge number of citizens of Watsonville 
and Pajaro Valley, and but a small proportion of 
tin' stock is held In persons not living in or near 
Watsonville, which is the principal place of busi- 



orable and 

jonvill '.on. 

Before , 

nj had drilled twelve wells, and had , 
through a varied experience with nun 

Tin's,- wills •, , few 

hundred to near two thousand feet in depth. In 
all of them oil be was found, and from 

some ot the well 

per day w as obtained. Thirteen is a luckv number 
tor the Watsonville ( )il Company, for in its 
thriteenth well rich oil sand was discovered, and 
since then each well drilled has proven to he a 
producer. 

I he companj has lour producing wells, is 

down 'inn feet in another, with excellent promise 
■ it being near oil sand, and will begin drilling an- 
other with the opening of the new year. Thi 
duction of the ilis-. net at present is hut slightly in 
ex( ess of 500 barrels per day. The producing 
wells are from 710 to I 190 feel deep. OnU one 

well has been run into the second sand, and its 
production is the best of anv well in the field. 
In this well the iirst stratum of oil sand is of a 
depth of 110 feet, and the second stratum is 25 





General View of the Sargent's Estate Oil Field. 



was shipped to San Francisco and used on the 
first asphalt sidewalks laid in the Pacific Coast 
metropolis. At that time and later efforts were 
made to reach the oil deposit, but the wells were 
not located in the right spot and the oil sand was 
not perforated by any prospector until the Wat- 
sonville Oil Company found it. The pioneer 
prospect holes, and a majority of the wells drilled 
by the Watsonville Oil Company were in, or 
bordering, the vast surface showing of oil. The 
successful wells are some distance northeast of 
the surface showing, and the trend of the sand 
is in that direction. 

The Watsonville Oil Company, which has 
been operating in the Sargent district for the 
past eight years, is now opening up one of the 
most promising of the new oil districts of Cali- 
fornia. The company met with long delay in 
striking the right spot to drill and penetrate oil- 



ness of the company. The officers of the com- 
pany are: 'J- S. Menasco, president; F. A. Kil- 
burn, O. D. Stoesser, Wm. De Hart and R. W. 
Eaton, directors; W. A. Cox, secretary, and W. 
H. Mehrten, superintendent at the oil field. The 
company was incorporated in 1897. There are 
3000 shares of stock of the par value of $100 each, 
of which 2200 have been issued and are fully paid 
up. Of the stock issued 200 shares were sold for 
$130 per share. The remainder of the stock, 800 
shares, is in the treasury, and is not for sale. Up 
to the time when the oil production became suffi- 
cient to meet operating and developing expenses 
the funds for the prosecution of work were pro- 
cured through assessments and the sale of stock. 
The stock is held in the main by neighbors and 
business associates of Watsonville and the busi- 
ness of the company has been conducted with 
great satisfaction to all interested. Not a share 
of the promotion stock has been issued, the direc- 
tors have attended to the business of the company 
without compensation, and "grafting" and "rake- 



feet. From all of the wells there is a heavy show- 
ing of gas, in fact enough to furnish light and 
fuel for the operations of the company. When 
perforated the wells gushed intermittently for 
several weeks, owing to the force of the escaping 
gas. 

The oil is conveyed by a pipe line two miles 
long of five inch pipe to tanks at a railroad siding 
at Chittenden, a station on the Coast line of the 
Southern Pacific Company, about 90 miles south 
of San Francisco and half way between ( 
and Pajaro. The oil flows nicely and pumps 
easily. It is not as heavy as the Kern oils, and is 
much like the Coalinga oils. Its gravity is from 
17 to 22 degrees. It is much liked as a fuel oil, 
being easy to handle and very satisfactory in heat 
results. 

There is a strong growing and local market 
for the oil from the Sargent district, and the 
Watsonville Oil Company is pushing develop- 
ment to largely increase production, with a cer- 



10 



PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 



HALFMOON BAY 



We are handling the stocks of some of the best operating companies 
of Halfmoon Bay. Various news items, from time to time appearing in 
this paper, have given the facts of the development work being carried for- 
ward. It is probably the only oil field in the entire country where no 
"wild catting" has ever been carried on by any company. All money re- 
ceived by operating companies of this field has been expended in legitimate 
developmnt work that has resulted in giving to stockholders an absolutely 
fair show for their money invested. 

As every one knows, Halfmoon Bay produces the highest grade oil 
ever found in commercial quantities in this or any pther country. Every 
company operating in the field is handled by business men on a .business 
basis. The shares in many of these companies will prove very profitable, 
as more wells are being continually drilled, properties are increasing in 
value and stocks will advance in price. We look for a big advance in the 
shares of the American Duchess Oil Company at an early date. We can 
sell for a short time, subject to advance without notice, shares of the 
American Duchess Oil Company at ten cents. Under the same conditions 
we can sell shares of the Paxton Halfmoon Bay Oil Company at five cents 
per share; that of the Wisconsin Pipe Line & Oil Company at seven cents 



per share for cash, and eight cents per share on the installment plan. We 

can sell a few shares of the Independent Oil Company at $105 per share. 

This latter stock is Preferred and takes all profits and dividends until the 

Preference is paid off, whereupon it becomes Common Stock and then 

shares equally with the Common Stock. 

. Time payments will be accepted on any of these stocks on the basis 

of 25 per cent cash and the balance in three monthly payments. This 

stock is sold to raise more money to drill more wells. 

Every legitimate oil and mining paper published, and every wholesale 

oil well supply house in California will tell you that these companies are 

legitimately and honestly handled by practical oil men who understand their 

business and that the officers of the respective companies are first class 

business men who have personally invested many thousands of dollars of 

« 
their own money in the enterprise. These companies will be good dividend 

payers and their shares will prove a very profitable investment. Address 

all orders to 

DEBENTURE SURETY COMPANY m 



Rialto Bldg., A 10. 



San Francisco, Cal. 



THE NATIONAL SUPPLY CO. 

OH Well Supplies 



Have you seen our National Special Boiler? 

It's the Finest Ever Built. Extra Large Dome. 

Boiler is made from two sheets steel and is just what is needed in the California fields 



COLUMBIAN CABLES 
BOVAIRD & SEYFANG and 
FARRAR & TREFFT ENGINES 
WIRE DRILLING LINES 



WIRE CASING LINES 
BOSTON CASING 
BOSTON TUBING 
BOSTON DRIVE PIPE 



Everything in Oil Well Supplies 



Main Office 
LOS ANGELES 



San Francisco Office 
317 Crossley Bldg. 



Branches: Bakersfield, McKittrick, Coalinga, Santa Maria 



the 



I that 

thr main line ot 
ami hut a few 



trom the 

I 
listant, and 
m ail 
line. Ie to the marketing of it* 

prodii 

The Alberta Oil Companj lia* 250 aires under 
from the Watsonville ( )il Company, anil 
ne well in oil sand and is drilling another 
ahnut a mil inville < >il Com- 

•■ Is, I ' -•■ li if this company is helil 
roy and I - par- 

Its place 'it bus n San Fran 

I N than is president and I'. R. Snyder is 

superintemlenr. 



I'M II IC Oil 

the W 

I oil prospects. The 
ime work during 
the pa-t year on the Santa ( | the moun- 

tains, near Watsonville. 

The I.ailil-Strattun Oil Company, II. G Strat- 
tim. manager, is drilling on a tra. t under lease 
from the Watsonville < >il Company, and is also 
drilling on the Van Ee Rancho, near Chittenden, 
the oil privileges of which it has under lease. 
This makes si\ rigs at work in this district — the 
nl and Van '• to* — within a distance 

of two milrs. 

Increased development and largely increased 
production uill be shown by the Sargent district 
during I" 



Coalinga Grows Apace 



.\s the year 1904 was ushered in then' was 
no oil field in the State that showed a more 
healthy condition than iliil Coalinga. From a 

comparatively new field a year had seen the dis- 
trict grow by leaps and bounds, until it stood 



stead lit the condition of these west side com- 
panies becoming better, it became gradually 

and many of the companies shut down 
entirely. Other companies that were "shut in" 
became more or less disheartened and a feeling 

of dissatisfaction hecame more or less general 



Oil l 

bandit in the field, and imm 

the movement of oil then I 

have loi several months exceeded tin 

duction, with the result that stocks ha\ . 
drawn upon until there is little surplus oil in the 

field. 

The late move of the I'. ( '. ( ). Companj in 
establishing another pumping plant in the field 
plainly shows the poliq ot the company in this 
field in taking can- ot its entin- production. Its 
Point Richmond end of the pipe lin. is carrying 
its full capacity ot oil dailj to tin tanks at 

Richmond, hut greater facilities were needed to 

take care of the great and growing production 

of the field, hence its new pump station. 

The present poliq oi the 1'. (.'. ( ). Company 

is to connect its new pump station with the 

Bakersfield end oi the pipe line at Mendota and 

m the Coalinga nil into its big steel tanks 

at Kern rivet. The I'. C. < ). Companj lias re 

cently completed several large earthen reset 

at Kern, into which the oil From the steel tanks 

will he emptied, this oil bein 

Stored in earthern reservoirs, while she Coalinga 

oil, being more volitile, would soon evaporate and 




"Oil City" the Original Coalinga Field. 



at the head of all the fields of the 
State in matter of development, if not 
in production. In the year 1903 the field had 
produced 2,075,000 barrels of oil; had 115 pro- 
ducing wells, of which forty-six were developed 
during the year and thirty wells were drilling. 
Every indication pointed to a rapid and pros- 
perous development of the field, which, to a great- 
er or less degree, has been realized. 

Early in the year 1904 the Pacific Coast Oil 
Company, by reason of the rapid increase in pro- 
duction of light gravity oil in this field, was com- 
pelled to discontinue the receipt of the heavier 
oil produced on the west side, with the 
result that not nearly as good a showing has 
been made as would have been if the entire out- 
put of all the wells could have been marketed 
for the entire year. The action of the P. C. O. 
Company was simply a natural condition of af- 
fairs, in that it was getting all the oil it could 
pump through its pipe line from the east side 
of the field, and, naturally, favored that side 
as it was using the oil for refining purposes in 
its refinery at Point Richmond and favored the 
better quality of oil. In the meantime the South- 
ern Pacific Railway Company and the Associated 
Oil Company relieved, to a greater or less extent, 
the surplus production of the west side, but in- 



among them. 

This condition of affairs in the heavy oil dis- 
trict of Coalinga, stimulated by the urgent need 
of a more stable supply of fuel oil, gave impetus 
to a pipe-line project that had been projected 
for some months previous and the launching of 
the Coalinga Oil and Transportation Company 
was the result. This company, backed by un- 
limited local capital, at once set about contract- 
ing a large part of the west side Coalinga pro- 
duct at a figure something above the best that 
had been looked for by the producers for some 
time to come, and on the strength of it some de- 
velopment work was done. In the meantime the 
C. O. T. Company was burning the candle at 
both ends figuring out a right of way to Mont- 
erey. This was quickly secured and almost be- 
fore it became generally known that a Coalinga- 
Pacific pipe-line was projected, the pipe was be- 
ing laid. In four months time the six-inch line 
had been completed and oil was flowing into the 
tanks at Monterey, 100 miles from Coalinga. 

This gave an outlet to considerable of the 
heavy oil of the Coalinga field, but other agencies 
were at work. The Southern Pacific and As- 
sociated companies each owned an incomplete 
pipe-line and tankage syst'tn. Combined they 
would make a useful and valuable asset to either 



become absorbed. This policy of the P. C. O. 
Company will provide for the surplus Coalinga 
oil for at least six months to come, probably 
longer if the storage of heavy oil is drawn upon 
as it is now generally conceded it will be. 

A glance at our comparative statistics for the 
year 1904 will suffice to show the remarkable 
growth of the field and its healthy condition at 
this time. The entire field is pervaded with a 
noticeable activity and prosperity. There are no 
more companies "shut in" for want of transpor- 
tation facilities and every one is finding a ready 
market for the product and at prices so good 
that there is little complaint. The total number 
of drilling rigs at present is forty-three, with fif- 
teen new rigs which will spud in shortly. There 
are approximately 500 men employed in the field. 

One of the most noticeable evidences of the 
prosperity of the Coalinga district is the ren 
able growth of its little metropolis, "Coalinga," 
which grew so fast during the early part of 1904 
that it commenced to overflow into contiguous 
territory. To provide for this a generous city 
extension was allotted and building commenced 
at once. It is conservatively estimated that Coal- 
inga has doubled in size twice during the year 
just closed. The present population of the town, 
including the oil field, is more than I Mill people. 



12 



PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 



BIG GOLD STRIKE AT BULLFROG 



Big strikes of phenomenal values at Bullfrog are reported in every 
issue of the Tonopah and Goldfield papers. On the property of the Bull- 
frog Extension Mining Company phenomenal values have been found 
and development work is going rapidly forward. Good progress is being 
made on the shaft that is being sunk on the big quartz ledge. If the com- 
pany never found a dollar's worth of high grade ore, the mine would prove 
to be the biggest low-grade proposition of the country. The ledge has 
many rich stringers that show great values that is exciting great interest 
in the property and surrounding properties have materially advanced in 




This picture shows an enormous outcropping of gold 
bearing quartz that is 200 feet wide. It extends 
through the property of the BULLFROG EX- 
TENSION MINING COMPANY. Assays made 
from this ledge show remarkable values, the lowest 
obtained being $6.20 per ton. Special samples as 
high as $9840. per ton. 



price. The stock of the Bullfrog Mining Company is now selling on the 
Exchange of the country at 70 cents. The stock of the Bullfrog Extension 
will be doing the same before long. IT IS THE BEST PROPOSITION 
OF THE FIELD. There is an enormous cross dyke passing across these 
claims which development is showing up as having great values. 



THE COMPANY WAS STARTED RIGHT. IT OWNS THE 
LAND AND EQUIPMENT. IT DOES NOT OWE A DOLLAR 
TO ANYBODY FOR ANYTHING. It has a good treasury reserve. 
It has money deposited in the bank to pay for the shaft that is being sunk 
under contract. Its title to the property is perfect. Its officers are honor- 
able business men and practical mining men. If you have lost money in 
buying shares of other mining companies, you should buy a few hundred or 
a few thousand shares of the BULLFROG EXTENSION and make up 
your losses. 

The elements of chance on this proposition are eliminated. There is 
no way for the company to lose the property. Everything is paid for from 
start to finish. It does not have to search for the ore, but is taking out 
high values from the very surface of the ground. High grade ore will be 
sacked and shipments made at an early date. BULLFROG IS GREATER 
THAN TONOPAH OR GOLDFIELD. IT HAS LARGER 
LEDGES AND GREATER VALUES. A telephone line to Bullfrog 
is almost completed. There are now two stage lines from the north, one of 
them being an automobile line. There are two from the south, a railroad 
being surveyed from Goldfield, also one from the south. 

Bullfrog is one of the phenomenal gold camps of the world, generally 
considered by mining men the greatest discovery ever made in this country. 

We have but a small allotment of stock left at 20 cents per share. 
Large orders are coming in by wire and by letter. It will soon be gone. 
The stock will be listed on the Exchange at an early date and you may 
look for an advance equal to that of the Bullfrog Mining Company. Re- 
serve a block of shares by wire, investigate. If you do not want them do 
not take them. We have illustrated printed matter in press. A copy will 
be sent on request. Address all orders to 




Debenture Surety Company, 



A 10, Rialto Building, 
San Francisco, Cal. 



WE LEAD === OTHERS FOLLOW 

That is not new===but it is literally true 

We have led the way to every oil field in the State of California 

We blazed the way. Our competitors followed our trail. 

WE HAVE BRANCH STORES IN NEARLY EVERY OIL FIELD IN THIS STATE 



WE SELL 



OIL WELL SUPPLIES 

. . Anything you want in that line we can furnish . . 



HERE ARE A FEW SPECIALITIES 


.BOILERS. 


. E N G,I N E S. 


.CORDAGE. 


. DRIVE-PIPE. 


THE ' HERRON SPECIAL" 


THE OIL WELL SUPPLY 
LINK ENGINE 


THE FITLER CABLE 


TUBING -CASING 


Lar£e Dome 


"They stand the Grief" 


IRON Pipe is Oar Hobby 




Strongest Most Durable 
Best 






Best Boiler Built 


The value is in the Rope 

ALL THERE IS TO IT, IS 

FITLER 


"READING" Goods are IRON 


All the big Santa Maria 


Gushers have been drilled 
with these Boilers. . . 


Try one of these on your 
next well 


Ask the men who have 
used it concerning quality 



R. H. HERRON COMPANY 

Los Angeles San Francisco Bakersfield Coalinga Maricopa Santa Maria 



OIL RKPORTER 






Santa Maria District 

by Joseph McDonnell 



HI . 1 1 : ■ Q field 

is but in , the most 

widely discussed district in the S 
tor the reason that attention h.is 
been drawn to it h) the enormo 
01 the well*, th ut the oil pro- 

duced and the close proximity ot the field to the 

ocean. 

A large drawback to the producing end ot this 
field is that the land is held in large tr.u- 
Compaq) with 20 - ot land is con- 

sidered vey "small tr)." The large companies 
hold thousands ot acres under one lease. The 
I Oil Company, it is claimed, owns and has 

under lease 1,000 acres in this and the 

Lompac district. While these large holdings 
have a tendency to keep the production down, it 
good fault in favor of the operating com- 
panies, tor the reason that it will be an easj mat- 
ter lor all to come to an understanding in re- 
gard to selling the product or to formulate an 
organization tor general benefits. 

1 lie real drawback to the district has been the 
lack of shipping facilities, as a number ot com- 
panies had to depend entirely on the narrow 
gauge railroad to handle their product. This 
fault is now being taken care ot. The Union 
Oil Company is building a six-inch line from 
Orcutt to Port Harford, ["he Pinal Company- 
is laving a four-inch line to Betteravia, and the 
sarj pipe has been ordered by the Graciosa 
Oil Company to connect its property with the 
Southern Pacific railroad near Cosmalia. What 
is needed badly is an independent six-inch line 
to connect the field with Port Harford, also the 
necessary storage to hold at least 100,000 bar- 
rels. When this is done the independent oper- 
ators will be in a position to deal advantageously 
with the purchasing companies. In connection 
with this pipe line an organization of the inde- 
pendent operators should be perfected. This 
would insure good prices for all time to come. 

It should be kept in mind the troubles the pro- 
ducers in the Kern river district have had for 
the past three years endeavoring to market their 
product. If reports are true, the recent organiza- 
tion effected in that held of the independent oper- 
ators has been a huge success and they are com- 
ing out with "full stockings." 

If the production of the Santa Maria field 
would not materially increase there would be no 
necessity for an organization of its producers. 
It is conceded that in two years from now the 
production will be at least five times as much 
as it is at the present time, and with this in- 
creased production, it is the work of a systematic 
organization to find new consumers and to keep 
pace with the increased supply. 

There is much discussion among the local oil 
men as to what effect the "bringing in" of such 
wells as the Union Gusher will have on the profit- 
able development of the field. It certainly will 
attract the attention of eastern capitalists and 
oil men, who, if they do not care to come into 
the field to produce the product, might take up 
the refining or marketing end of the industry, 
and again, it will serve to show the possibility 
of the remarkable amount of fuel and refining 
oil California is capable of producing. It is 
conservatively estimated that the present produc- 
tion of fuel oil in the world is less than 5 per 
cent of the world's demand, and it is for this 
cause that the consumption is not increasing 
more rapidly than it has. 

The only real harm that these gushers can do 
is for the present, and it will affect only the com- 
panies that are now producing. There is no 
denying the fact that it will have the effect for 
the present to lower prices. It will ,act as a 
lever for the purchasing companies and consum- 
ers to force the producers to sell at their figures. 
There is no denying that at the present time 
there is over-production in this State, and such 
is liable to be the case for some time to come. 
It is estimated that the consumption is increasing 
at a rate of about 3,000,000 barrels a year, with 
good chances that it will continue to increase 
this amount or probably more. It is also a cer- 
tainty that, barring the Santa Maria district, 



Oth« district Mate have plenty ut uutk 

ahead of them to keep up to their present pro- 
■i. For instance, the statistics of the Kern 

i:\er field indicates that the production in that 
I will he little more in 1904 than it was in 

Whether or not there will In- a steady 
decrease from this time on onlj time will tell. 
linty that the present production can- 
not he iiit reased t" an] great extent. 

While the production in the Coalings district 
i- being materially increased from month to 



remarkable does not happen ten 
the town ot Santa Maris v. 
• little cities on the ( 

minent of .mies 

is the Pinal. This company has ;t the 

ing wells with 
HI hands ;, day. Hi 

impletcd the wells thi 
drilling on, which will L-ivr them ten producing 
wells, wnli a conservative estimated 
oi 25 m barrels .1 day. This company's 

the w liter believes, i^ the best piet e of oil 

property in the State today. Much credit is due 

to the able management of the company. 

The new companies to begin operations dur- 
ing the pasi yeai are the Recruit ( )il 
tlu- Santa Maria ( )il Company, the Radiun 




Gusher of the Union Oil Company, Santa Maria. This well is spouting at the rate of 30,000 barrels daily. 



month, the time is not far away when the field 
will be defined and the production will reach 
the top notch. As soon as this condition of af- 
fairs exist, considerable work will have to be 
done to keep up the production and a gradual 
decline will be noticed. 

Taking all these matters into consideration it 
looks as though a very promising future is in 
store for the Santa Maria district. It is the 
general belief that the year of 1905 will be a 
very prosperous one for the oil industry all over 
the State. 

A strange fact connected with this district is 
the financial interest the Santa Maria people 
have taken in their home field. More than half 
of the operating companies are owned and con- 
trolled by residents of this county. If some- 



Company, the Union Sugar Company and the 
New Pennsylvania Petroleum Company. 

The Recruit Oil Company has so far not fin- 
ished up a well. This company has been run- 
ning three strings of tools, but its territory is 
miles away from producing wells. One well 
has been abandoned near Los Alamos. It has 
an excellent showing of oil in its well at Cat 
Canyon. This company is now moving lumber 
on the ground for rig No. 1 on the Lucas tract 
near Orcutt. This well is farther north than 
any well so far started, and will be watched 
with much interest. 

The Santa Maria Oil Company, which is 
commonly known as the "Kaiser," finished up 
its No. 1 well at a depth of a trifle over 2100 
feet. This well is one of the very best in the 



14 



PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 



district. Mr. Kaiser is at present in the East 
interesting capital to further develop his prop- 
erty. 

The Radium Oil Company is down about 1500 
feet with an eight-inch pipe on its No. 1, and 
no doubt is expressed but what they will get an 
excellent well. 

The Union Sugar Company's No. 1 well is 
down about 400 feet and are using an eighteen 
inch stove pipe casing and hydraulic jacks. 

This company is now working on its second 
hole. It was obliged to move about 100 feet to 
the present location on account of a large cave 
in the top formation. 

The New Pennsylvania Petroleum Company 
is also using an eighteen-inch stove pipe casing 
and hydraulic jacks, and so far is having excel- 
lent success. This company was delayed some 
in the scarcity of water, but as this is now rem- 
edied work will be pushed to completion. 

There are a number of new companies that 
will be ready to start operating shortly. The 
Barca Oil Company on the Barca tract is now 
building their rig and moving their machinery, 
and expect to begin drilling by the first of the 
year. The same can be said of the Calientz Oil 
Company, adjoining the Kaiser property. 

The Claremont Oil Company, we understand, 
will be moving a rig on the southeast corner of 
the Arellanes tract before the new year begins. 
This company has a number of producing wells 
in the Kern river district. 



The Tados Santos Oil Company, composed 
mostly of residents of Salinas, will begin oper- 
ating shortly on the southeast corner of the Za- 
bala tract. This company has an excellent piece 
of territory. 

The Rice Ranch Oil Company, which has 
been drilling in the Cat Canyon for the past 
year, has about concluded to take a new start. 
This company has had considerable trouble with 
the top sand formation and its hole was reduced 
to six inches at a depth of 1100 feet. 

All the pipe will be removed, hydraulic jacks 
will be installed and an effort made to go deeper 
with the stove pipe and casing. 

Much has been published in regard to the 
gusher that was tapped on December 2nd by the 
Union Oil Company on the Hartnell tract, and 
contrary to all other big wells, this one has not 
been exaggerated in the least. 

This well today if let loose would produce 
better than 10,000 barrels every twenty-four 
hours. As it is at present it is producing at least 
8000 barrels a day, and it is flowing under a 
pressure of 150 pounds to the square inch. 

This well was finished with an eight-inch 
pipe and is connected up on the derrick floor 
with a six-inch pipe line which carries the oil 
about 200 yards away and shoots into a room, 
from which it gravitates to the company's tanks 
near Orcutt. 

This well without a doubt is the largest well 
in the United States at this time. 



V 



Has the McKittrick Field Fulfilled 

Expectations ? 



BY CLJtHEMCE WILSON 




I HE McKittrick field is about the 
only one in the State that has not 
i)? fulfilled the great things expected of 
it when the field was first started. 
While all the other fields of the State have been 
extended to far beyond their first defined limits 
the McKittrick field is practically the same nar- 
row and very productive field it was when the 
first dozen or so wells were drilled in it. 

Development work in this district seems to 
have proved that the belt in it is very narrow, 
and experimental work on the outskirts has not 
given satisfactory results, although the limits of 
the proven oil belt has been extended some dis- 
tance north and west. When the field was first 
opened up the phenomenal gushers of the Kern 
river and Giant companies gave reason for think- 
ing the greatest oil field in the State had been 
discovered, but subsequent work near these large 
wells proved that it was a comparatively small 
pool that produced the great quantities of oil 
that came from these few wells. 

Up to the time the great well of the Section 
Seven Company was brought in at Coalinga, Mc- 
Kittrick enjoyed the distinction of having the 
largest well in California. The big Shamrock 
well, as it was called, produced on an average 
of from 500 to as high as 1500 barrels of oil per 
day. This well is situated on the Shamrock 
lease of the Associated Oil Company, formerly 
belonging to Green & Whittier, and although 
the production now does not come up to its for- 
mer record, yet is still one of the best wells in the 
McKittrick district. 

Many other wells have drilled in the vicinity 
of this one, but none have near equaled this 
big one. From some mysterious reason this par- 
ticular well seemed to have tapped sands that 
the other wells did not penetrate, and diligent 
drilling has failed to get anything that would 
near equal its record. 

The McKittrick Oil Company was one of the 



pioneers in the field and for some time had a 
very nice production from its lease, but in en- 
deavoring to carry a well deeper and strike pos- 
sible richer sands at a greater depth, one of the 
greatest freaks of the oil country was found. 
The great McKittrick artesian well of hot sul- 
phur water was brought in, and for over two 
years this well has been flowing over the top of 
casing a solid stream of hot sulphur water 
through a 5j,<j-inch pipe. An unlimited supply 
of this water seems to be here, and for two years 
thousands and thousands of barrels of hot water 
has been finding its way to the surface. The 
flow is as strong now as when the first water 
broke through the overlying clay and commenced 
to flow. This, of course, ruined the well for 
oil, and for some time the other wells on the 
lease produced practically nothing but water, but 
Mr. H. B. Guthrey, who has gained a reputa- 
tion as an expert on shutting off water in oil 
wells, finally succeeded in shutting off the water 
in the other wells, and now the McKittrick 
company has a good production of oil from a 
lease that was formerly ruined for oil purposes. 

The Dabney Oil Company, which was one 
of the very first in the field, may be said to have 
made an oil field out of the McKittrick pros- 
pect. It has a large number of wells whose in- 
dividual production per well is not large, yet in 
the aggregate totals a respectable amount of oil 
per day. 

During the past year it has several times been 
reported that the capitalists back of the Dabney 
Oil Company were intending building a pipe 
line from McKittrick to the coast to enable the 
operators in the district to have some other out- 
let for their oil, being entirely at the mercy of 
the railroads, which from their experience in the 
past, had worked many hardships on the ship- 
pers of oil from McKittrick. The shortage of 
cars and the difficulty in shipping the oil pro- 
duced has kept the McKittrick oil men from de- 



veloping this field. When it has been impos- 
sible to move what oil was produced it has not 
looked feasable to the property owners to expend 
the large amount of money necessary in drilling 
new wells when their experience in the past had 
shown them how hard a proposition it was to 
move what oil they did have for sale. 

The McKittrick operators have not been 
troubled with the water problem to the extent 
of those in the Kern river field. A few wells 
on the Dabney and Southern Pacific leases have 
given trouble on account of the water, but it 
is thought the efforts to shut the water off in 
these wells have been entirely successful and 
this part of the field is through with all trouble 
on account of water. 

During the past year the Fearless Oil Company 
made an attempt to put a deep well down north 
of the town and near the Southern Pacific depot, 
but after having to abandon one hole and meet- 
ing with bad luck and much trouble on the sec- 
ond, the project was given up for the present 
and the deep test hole has not yet been drilled. 
It is the belief of many of the oil men of Mc- 
Kittrick that if a well could be drilled to the 
2000 or 3000 foot level that somewhere near 
these depths would be found a large body of oil, 
much lighter than the oil now produced near 
the 1000-foot level. All attempts to reach these 
levels have so far proved unsuccessful. 

The McKittrick Oil Company did succeed in 
getting to the 2200-foot mark, but this well was 
located north of the development, and in the 
opinion of most of the practical men in the field 
would have missed the supposed light oil even 
if it is to be found underneath the present oil 
strata. 

Chanslor and Canfield drilled a deep well on 
section 4 south, three miles from the town and 
Dabney property, and abandoned the hole in the 
neighborhood of 2000 feet. This well also failed 
to show the promised light oil in quantities that 
would pay for the development of the territory. 

Considering that these two deep wells were 
drilled many miles apart and outside of the trend 
of the oil belt, many of the property owners are 
not yet satisfied that the territory has been tested 
to the full extent it should be. On account of 
the low prices ruling for the last two years, 
coupled with the hardship of shipping oil, no 
one has been found willing to expend the neces- 
sary capital to fully test the question of a deep 
sand of light oil underneath the present McKit- 
trick sand. 

Keller and Berry have done much to develop 
the McKittrick field during the last two years. 
They have brought in several good wells and 
now have one of the best and most productive 
properties in this field. 

The San Francisco & McKittrick Oil Com- 
pany has eight wells, the most of which are good 
producers. Having a large amount of land, this 
company has developed but a small portion of 
.its holdings, but as is the case with nearly all 
the large companies, the price obtained for oil 
and prospect for future high prices have been so 
gloomy that but few of them have been willing 
to expend so much capital. 

McKittrick cannot be said to have developed 
to any great extent during the past year. It is 
possible that more oil is being shipped now than 
was the first of last year, but new work has been 
very scarce and has been more in the shape of 
forced drilling and development than a desire to 
increase the present production of the different 
McKittrick oil companies. 









HALFMOON BAY 



B 



nued 
tlin 

Icttir \ 1 tlic old romp 

I less drilling and one new com- 
pany has recent! rporated to develop a 
i Hopkins tract, lying between 
the Debenture 

Tunitas crock and the Salee, Guiberson and 
Hayne interests of thi . canyon. 

The carl- r the Halfmoon Bay field 

has heen told man) tinier through the columns 
oi the Rii'uRrtR. hut is always <it interest, ami 
we make mi apology tor repeating a part (it it. 
which is as follow s : 

A number oi the Pacific Coast i M 

iny drilled a number of shallow wells in 

ma Canyon, making a discovery in every 

well. Some time previous to this a company had 

drilled two shallow wells about a mile and a halt 
southeast of the Purissima property, cm what is 
known as Tunitas creek. getting the oil sand 
at about slid feet and more than $15,000 worth 








56° Oil flowing into tank, Halfmoon Bay. 

of oil was taken from them. The operators 
finally got into a litigation and the wells were 
abandoned. About five years ago the property 
was leased by other parties and a well started 
thereon. They got a crooked hole at seventy 
feet and moved the rig and started another well. 
At 600 feet this hole went crooked and was also 
abandoned, the derrick being again moved to a 
point about twenty-five feet away. This hole also 
went crooked and ran into the second hole drilled. 
Then the company ran out of funds, became 
discouraged, and abandoned the property after 
an expenditure of over $18,000. It is claimed 
that primitive drillings tools and mismanage- 
ment were the causes of this failure. 

Then Sallee, Gulberson and Hayne, becom- 
ing interested in the great possibilities of the 
field, took over the property on Purissima Can- 
yon and have drilled eight wells in which oil 
was discovered in [laying quantities in every case. 
They have a capacity of about 300 barrels per 
day altogether, a part of which is used in the 
manufacture of paint; this oil being particularly 
adapted for the purpose. These were all shadow 
wells. These people have now started their ninth 
well with the largest casing obtainable that they 
may drill to a depth of 2000 to 3000 feet if nec- 
essary to reach the main oil strata, which all 
agree lies below any sand yet reached. Their 
well \i now down about 1200 feet. , 

About this time Mr. J. F.. Kerr of San Fran- 



hecanie favorabl) impressed with the field, 
and. after a thon jh investigation, bought out 
the company that hai n Tunitas 

and commenced development of the p: 
with modern methods and machinery. The field 
is a difficult "lie to drill in and even though the 
company had the Inst drilling rig obtainable and 
the most experienced men in the country, they 
found difficulties not to be contended with in 
the average field. They encountered stratas of 
disintegrating shale, and day that "froze" to the 
casing, making the work difficult and expensive. 
Taking an oil sand outcropping 400 feet in 
thickness that was exposed about 800 teet aw av 
as a basis, they set out to dull a deep well. They 
had fishing jobs and numerous other difficulties 
that woidd have caused the average manager to 
give up in despair. It required over a year to 
drill the well to 1600 feel m depth. They passed 
through several strata of oil sand which often 
had a sufficient gas pressure to throw the oil over 
the top ot the derrick; yet they did not gain suf- 
ficient depth to reach the 400-foot sand that out- 
crops above the camp. This well is said to be 
tor twenty barrels a day and is improving 
all the time. There is 140 feet of hard sand 
that is close grained, earning much oil in this 
well which will be shot and then it is believed 
that the capacity of the well will be more than 
doubled. No promotion stock was issued by this 
company known as the Wisconsin D. & P. L. 
Company. No officers' salaries have been paid, 
and every dollar received from the sale of stock 
has been expended in actual work. 

The next well started by Mr. Kerr was on the 
property of the Illinois Oil Bond Company. This 
well reached a depth of 800 feet. Excellent indi- 
cations of oil were encountered almost from the 
start, but work was stopped at the depth reached 
on account of lack of funds. Mr. Kerr himself 
put several thousand dollars into the company to 
enable it to continue work, and made a standing 
offer that he would put as much of his own money 
into the enterprise as would any other twenty 
stockholders, showing his faith in the ultimate 
outcome of the proposition. 

One year ago Mr. Kerr organized the Pax- 
ton Halfmoon Bay Oil Company and started 
a well soon afterwards. The well was drilled 
to a depth of 1600 feet. There is now 400 feet 
of 52 degree gravity oil in the hole. The man- 
agement believes that a big well will be brought 
in by drilling deeper and active operations will 
soon be resumed with their success already as- 
sured. The Paxton company controls 690 acres 
of land, all of which is beiieved to be within 
the proved belt. Out of a capitalization of 
500,000 shares more than one-half is still in the 
treasury, which is an exceptional record. Like 
the Wisconsin company, no promotion stock was 
issued, the manager investing more heavily than 
any other stockholder. 

Another company managed by Mr. Kerr is the 
Independent Oil Company, operating on property 
adjoining the other companies and within the 
proven belt. This was the first company to 
bring in a good producing well on this tract, it 
starting off at 300 to 400 barrels a day. The 
gas pressure was enormous, throwing the oil 
nunc than 100 feet in the air. The gas, reaching 
a fire-box several hundred feet away, became ig- 
nited and a terrific explosion followed which 
could be heard for miles around. At Purissima, 
five miles away, several parties plainly saw the 
effects of the explosion and describe it as being 
a vast column of yellow smoke (gas) being shot 
into the air hunrdeds of feet. It then burst 
into a flame, the light of which was blinding 
and the report deafening. This was repeated 
several times during a period of ten minutes and 
the natives became terrified, thinking it a vol- 
canic effect. The de-rick was burned to the 
ground and the four men working on the well 



thing it i. ime in contact with. 

■ 

, orted the 
R.BPOD 1 1 r the next day. \- soon as ti 

could d a new derrick was built 
at the expense ot the ever ready manager, the 
well cleaned out and put on th pump, and it 
is a splendid producer. The oil is sold under 
contract for $2.50 pel barrel with a Mint 
much more attractive figure as s i ;,s the 

ent contract has been lilted. Further develop- 
ment is being carried on by this company. 

["he American Duchess Oil Company is one 
of the big, strong operating companies. It has 
st equipment ot any company in the field, 
and probably, for the same amount' ot money 
invested, is equal to or superior to any proposi- 
tion in the Slate. It has all kinds of drilling 

and fishing tools, thousands of feet ot i 
a machine shop, electric light plant, bunkhouse, 
cookhouse, offices, teaming outfit, with water 
Humes and writer wheels foi ope: pai 

the machinery .and elevatii 

hundred feet to points when needed tor drilling 
purposes. The electric light plant prevents pos- 
sible danger from fire when night work is car- 
ried on. 

The Duchess Company drilled to a depth of 
800 feet, with one string of casing, in less time 
than any company of the field, and probably 
equaled anything in the State. They then en- 
countered a stratum of blue clay which resulted 
in a series of difficulties, such as the parting of 




Oil Wells, Halfmoon Bay. 



the cable several times, the loss of drilling and 
fishing tools, the collapsing of casing and the 
sticking of the pipe in the tough, tenacious blue 
clay, where it seemed for a period of two months 
it would be utterly impossible to pass through. 

Had the Duchess Company been officered as 
is the average company, it would have perma- 
nently suspended operations, but its superintend- 
ent, Peter Holmes, is a man of unusual ability 
and resourcefulness and, with the general man- 
ager of the company, devised ways and means 
for overcoming the difficulties. At this period 
it was requiring a great deal of cash to overcome 
the difficulties and many of the large stockhold- 
ers, who were wealthy, got "cold feet" and re- 
fused to help. The manager backed his faith 
and judgment to the extent of more than 
for labor and materials and he finally overcame 
all difficulties. It was then that the exact facts 
were made known to the stockholders and a Mori. 
of stock was offered to them for 
and they stood by the management by o\ 
scribing for the block of 100,000 shares. The 
company is now making splendid progress on 
its well, in an oil bearing formation u ith 
tremendous gas pressure. At 800 feet the) tem- 
porarily shut off a good production, the 
as was found in the Independent well 200 feet 
away. The Duchess is drilling for the si 
sand and they expect to get an enormous pro- 
ducer. That is the judgment of practical oil 
men and experts. 

It is no surprise to us that tl panies 

readily sell their shares, a, stockholders toe treat- 
ed fairly and the business is handled ' 



16 



PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 



capable men, who back their faith by their cash, 
making large personal investments. 

This field has the highest grade oil ever found 
in commercial quantities. It is from 52 to 55 
gravity oil, which sells for $2.50 to $3 per bar- 
rel. The wells are about two miles from the 
ocean at an elevation of 800 feet, which affords 
gravity pipe line transportation to a point where 
it can be loaded on steamers and transported to 
refineries at San Francisco, only forty miles from 
the wells, at a cost of 10 to 12 cents a barrel. 
They unquestionably have all the elements of a 
successful business proposition, honest manage- 
ment, a ready market, transportation and big 
prices. 

The several companies managed by Mr. Kerr 
are handled on a very economical basis, probably 
not equaled by any combination of companies in 
the country. A very complete repair shop is 
maintained for the making and repairing of tools. 
The shop is equipped with forge, lathe, furnace, 
cranes for handling heavy machinery, electric 
light plant, and, in fact, everything required for 
repairing oil well machinery. A great saving is 
thus made both in time and expenses. The ex- 
pense of running the shop is pro-rated among the 
various companies so that the cost to each is in- 
significant. A similar arrangement is in effect 
between the companies so that fishing tools and 



ers in case any one of the companies should fail; 
thereupon the Debenture Surety Company was 
incorporated and to it was issued, as trustee, 
from 15 to 30 per cent of the capital stock of 
each company, depending on the value and 
amount of their holdings. 

This trust fund is for the purpose that if any 
one of the companies should fail, the trustee takes 
from its trust fund as much of the stock of the 
surviving companies as may be necessary and is- 
sues it to the stockholders of the failing company, 
thereby protecting the stockholders, absolutely, 
from any loss whatsoever Ordinarily if a com- 
pany fails its stockholders lose their money. Un- 
der the trust fund plan a buyer of stock in any 
one of the companies has as many chances for 
winning as there are companies in the organi- 
zation. The scope of the • Debenture Surety 
Company's trust fund has been so widened as 
to include other oil and mining companies whose 
properties are of value and well managed. To 
us it seems a very good plan, affording to the 
stockholders a protection and guarantee that is 
of unusual value. The Debenture Surety Com- 
pany has about 3000 acres of leases in the Half- 
moon Bay field and has become so favorably 
impressed with the field that it has determined . 
to drill a number of wells the coming year. It is 
a strong corporation, having paid a dividend of 
5 cents per share per month for twenty-one con- 



Hopkins tract and attempted to secure a lease. 
He was unable to do so, however, and for the 
time abandoned the attempt. Later on he en- 
gaged the services of M. M. Ogden, the oil 
expert, to pass on the land and his report was 
such that Mr. Brown renewed his attempt to 
secure a lease of it, and this time was successful, 
securing the entire tract on very favorable terms. 
The Buffalo-California Oil Company is the' 
outcome of his efforts. Work of drilling the 
first well will be commenced immediately. 

Many local people, becoming attracted by the 
great possibilities of the field, are negotiating for 
property, and from present indications Half- 
moon Bay will be one of the busiest fields in the 
State. 

The geological indications are excellent, the for- 
mation being regular and in place. The apex 
of the anticline evidently passes directly through 
the properties managed by Mr. Kerr (consisting 
of over 2000 acres) and can be traced for many 
miles by the outcroppings of sand rock saturated 
with oil and by the oil seepages, many of which 
flow several gallons of oil every day. Even the 
wells brought in in the first sand would make the 
companies great dividend-payers, but by putting 
them down to the second and third sand, where 
the great main reservoir of oil is held, the proper- 
ties would become a veritable bonanza. 

From the start The Pacific Oil Reporter 




Some of the wells at Halfmoon Bay owned by Companies under Management of J. E. Kerr. 



other supplies are exchanged on such a basis that 
from 50 to 80 per cent of the cost ordinarily in- 
curred is saved. The office and incidental ex- 
penses are likewise brought down to the minimum 
by having the general expenses pro-rated. 

We know of no instance in the oil business 
where a man, as Mr. Kerr has done, assumed the 
management of several oil companies without 
compensation, giving his best efforts and more 
than $30,000 in cash to carry on their operations. 
At times when the companies have been short of 
funds he has paid their bills out of his own pocket, 
and the result of this is that the credit of every 
company is rated as first-class among the banks 
and supply houses. 

Each of the above named companies has an 
Eastern office, where a number of the directors 
are located. The location of them is as follows: 
Baraboo, Wis.; La Crosse, Wis.; Paxton, 111.; 
Chicago, 111., and New York City. 

It was arranged by these companies that each 
should pool a certain amount of their stock in 
a trust fund for the protection of the stockhold- 



secutive months. At the organization of the 
company its stock was sold for 20 cents per 
share. It now sells for $5 per share, 
stock outstanding. 

Other developments in this promising field are 
numerous. The High Gravity Oil Company 
partly drilled a well on the opposite side of the 
creek from the properties managed by Mr. Kerr. 

The gas pressure was strong and oil is coming 
into the hole constantly. It seems probable that 
work on the well will be resumed soon, as Eastern 
parties are negotiating for the property, includ- 
ing the drilling outfit. 

The company just organized to operate on 
the Sarah Hopkins tract is known as the Buf- 
falo-California Oil Company, with home office 
at Livermore, Cal. The company is composed 
of prominent business and professional men of 
Buffalo, N. Y., and Livermore, while the presi- 
dent, Mr. W. H. Brown, is a practical oil man 
of many years' experience. 

Mr. Brown, while in charge of other drilling 
operations in the Halfmoon Bay field, became 
attracted by the favorable formation of the Sarah 



has been a staunch believer in the richness of the 
Half-'Moon Bay field and its predictions have 
been set forth from time to time in its many ar- 
ticles and editorials. During the life of the 
former editor and proprietor, W. B. Winn, he 
always claimed that this district would ultimately 
become the foremost in the State, and the present 
management concurs fully in this belief. We 
have, from time to time, investigated the com- 
panies as to their soundness and we have always 
found them rated as first-class. In this opinion 
we are backed up by such people as the California 
Safe Deposit & Trust Company, the Germania 
National Bank, R. H. Herron Company, Buf- 
falo Machine Works and others of like repute. 
Every oil man who has ever visited the field and 
paid any attention to it has spoken of it in the 
highest terms of praise. From our personal 
knowledge of this field we believe it offers one 
of the best inducements to investors to be found 
in the country. 

In our next annual edition we hope to be able 
to report a fine production from the Halfmoon 
Bay field. 



PACIF K 



Growth of the Oil Welt Supply 
Industry 




OTHING > ihf 

thai have taken place 

in the manner of drilling oil wells 
in California than the fad that 
when the National Supply 
9 on this oust, the 
• rig irons then nscil were .I'^-inch, with 
•hen came 4-inch: after that 
inch, anil later still 5-inch rig irons. The 
1-inch an«l 1',,-inch diameter wire drilling lines 
call tor still heavier irons, and the .National Sup- 
ply Co. is now building rig irons with shafts 
6 inches in diameter, and with 36-inch flanges, 
extra heavy, and 2' --inch Mannington Pattern 
solid Pitman stirrups. We saw some of these 
irons in the Santa Maria and Coalinga fields, and 
they are without doubt the finest and heaviest 
rig irons yet brought out in California. They 
weigh 3200 pounds and help to solve the prob- 
lem of deep drilling. 

The National Supply Co, lias also brought 
out a special two-sheet horizontal tubular boiler, 
with extra large dome, which is meeting with 
great favor. They carry these boilers in stock in 
55 and 4(1 horse-power. 

Wherever you find an nil field there you will 
see the sign "NATIONAL SUPPLY COM- 
PANY." It is the policy of the company to fol- 
low the lead of the prospector and bring to his 
door all that he shall need. We might have said 
that it is one of the policies of the company; 



all be 



enumerated here. 

• t the 
fornia. 
ncern in the East, where it 
built up an enviable reputation in the e.irK d.i\- 
of the oil business. As the oil industry was 
pushed to the Western States, there the National 
followed and today maintains a suppl] house in 
"il field in the United States. 
During I'>I4 the National Supply Co. opened 
an office in San Francisco, at ,?17 Crosslej Build- 
ing, and also a store at Santa Maria. Thej 
now have stores at Los Angeles, Hakersliehl. 
Coalinga, McKittrick and Santa Maria, and an 
office at San Francisco, which is in chat 
Mr. \V. M. Wallace. They report that busi- 
ness during l'*i>4 has been exceedingly good, and 
predict that the year 1905 will witness a great 
revival in nil drilling in California. You w ill also 
find them wherever the oil prospector may lead: 
but we are saying too much, for it's "National 
Supply Company, that's all," the country over, 
and all the boys know it means good goods and 
courteous treatment. 



R. H. HERRON COMPANY 




MONG oil men throughout the en- 
tire State, no business house on the 
coast is better known than that of 
R. H. Herron Company, dealers 
exclusively in oil well supplies. Wherever an oil 
field has been opened up in the State, there a 
branch store of this popular firm has been estab- 
lished, and the wants of the oil operators care- 
fully looked after. 



It i? b) several \rars the 

i~t and has earned and still 
tains the prestige due a pioneei 

Mr. R, 11. Hen, in, the found 
heating his name, was in California dining the 
earl) oil excitement in 1895, and at onci 
the opportunities presented for a busines 
recti] associated with the oil industry, and as he 
had been an extensive oil operator in Pennsyl- 
vania for twentj m;hs preceding, .in,! v. 
miliar with every branch and detail of the busi- 
ness, h,- was well equipped for the launching of 
iust such an enterprise as he then decided on. 
H cess of the house proves its founder's wis- 
dom and ability. 

Ever since the house was established it has 
been its policy to follow the oil man to his field 
ot operations, the same as is customary in the 
eastern fields. While the main store and offices 
of the companj were, and are still, at Los An- 
geles, branch stores were established in any new- 
field which promised to be an oil field, until at 
present the firm has stores carrying a complete 
line of the latest and most improved oil well 
machinery tools, cordage, etc., <at Coalinga, Ba- 
kersfield, Maricopa, Santa Maria, San Francisco 
and Los Angeles. 

There are certain lines of oil country goods 
handled by this firm which are recognized by oil 
men the country over as the "best there is go- 
ing." Among these are the Filler Drilling 
Cable, the "Herron Special" large dome tubular 
boiler and "Reading" drive pipe, casing and tub- 
ing. Some of these goods cost a trifle more than 
other makes, but the wide-awake operators all 
use them and insist on having them. These 
goods "show the money." 

Another fact of which this firm feels justly 



fl 



Think not of what they pay, but of what 
they £et for what they pay. 



WISE BUYERS 

Strictly Reliable Goods in all Lines 

OIL WELL 



Machinery 



AND 



SUPPLIES 



BOILERS 
ENGINES 

Steam Pumps 




IF YOU WANT 




B 



BOSTON CASING 

We have it in all sizes 



LET US SHOW YOU 
HOW WE TREAT 
OUR CUSTOMERS 



MACHINE SHOP 



Tools and Equipments 



Pacific Coast Manufacturing Co. = Los Angeles, Cal. 






18 



PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 



BUY A BARLOW & HILL MAP 



OF THE OIL FIELDS 



Large Blue Prints, . ; 
Large Blue Prints on Linen, 
Book of Indexed Maps, 



$1.50 

3.00 

.50 



SPECIAL MAPS MADE TO ORDER 

Prices on Application 

&f>e Pacific Oil Reporter 



318 PINE STREET 



SAN FRANCISCO 



BARLOW & HILL. 
UP-TO-DATE MAP MAKERS. 



Barlow & Hill, the well-known firm of "up- 
to-date" map-makers, are enjoying a well-de- 
served and hard earned distinction of being the 
leading map-makers in the State. The firm is- 
sues practically everything in the line of oil and 
mining maps which are always reliable; in fact 
"absolute reliability" is the key-note of the firm. 
Besides regular maps of all the leading fields in 
the State the company makes a specialty of spec- 
ial maps and drawings. Tlie firm has built up 
an enviable reputation in handling reliable min- 
ing and oil properties, and are always in a posi- 
tion to give reliable information concerning nearly 
every company in the western part of the coun- 
try. The new Coalinga map issued by this con- 
cern is a beauty. It can be procured from the 
office of The Pacific Oil Reporter or from 
the makers at Bakersfield, California. 



DIRECTORS. 
M. Grossmayer. 
S. Fleisher. 
J. B. Bonetti. 
T. R. Finley. 
S. A. Johnson. 
C. F. Bramming. 
James Smith. 



ASSESSMENT NOTICE. 



Arline Oil Company, a corporation. Principal 
place of business, San Francisco. Location 
of property, Fresno County, California. 
Notice is Hereby Given that at a meeting of 
the Directors held on the 24th day of December, 
1904, assessment No. 2 of one cent per share 
was levied upon the capital stock of the corpo- 
ration, payable on or before the 3rd day of 
February, 1905, to J. W. Pauson, Secretary, at 
the office of the Company, at Room 500 Parrott 
Building, San Francisco. Any stock upon which 
this assessment shall remain unpaid on said 3rd 
day of February, 1905, will be delinquent and 
advertised for sale at public auction, and, unless 
payment is made before, will be sold on the 27th 
day of February, 1905, to pay the delinquent 
assessment, together with costs of advertising and 
expenses of the sale. J. W. Pauson, 

Secretary. 
Room 500 Parrott Building, S. F.,_Cal. 

OFFICERS. 
M. Grossmayer, Pres. 
S. Fleisher, Vice Pres. 
J. B. Bonetti, Treas. 
T. R. Finley, Sec'y. 
S. A. Johnson, Gen. Mgr. 



Barca Oil Company 



CAPITALIZATION, $500,000; PAR VALUE STOCK, $1.00 PER SHARE. 



The property of this Company consists of 250 acres of land, situated one-half mile north of 
the famous Purissima well of the Union Oil Company, which has been flowing 500 barrels of oil 
daily for the past year, and it is directly in line between that well and the same company's 
famous 12,000-barrel gusher on the Hartnell Tract. 

We are offering enough stock in our Company at 25 cents per share to drill our first well, 
and at this price the stock is the best and safest investment so far offered in the Santa Maria Dis- 
trict, and a sure money-maker for those who invest. 

Our well No. 1 is now drilling and will b: pushed to completion as rapidly as possible. 

For further information address 



BARCA OIL COMPANY, 



proud is that much of the improved machinery, 
heavy material, etc., now used throughout the 
California' oil fields, have been introduced by 
them. 

With characteristic alertness, the men at the 
head of the concern adopted every improvement 
in any branch which promised better results for 
the operator, and some of these have resulted not 
only as money-savers for the oil man, but have 
placed the possibility of accidents and delays at 
a minimum. 

This firm claims to be the leader in the oil 
well supply business, and with a large degree of 
truth, for it is a fact that its stores were in every 
important field of the State and had a business 
established there, before its competitors got 
awake to the possibilities of these various fields. 

The great success of the house is largely due 
to the energy- and business acumen of its found- 
er, and his reputation for integrity and square 
dealing has made this firm "headquarters" for 
oil men all over the State. In fact there is not 
a thing used in the California oil fields that this 
house cannot supply through some one of its vari- 
ous houses. Another strong card for this house 
is the fact that its employers are all practical oil 
well supply men, many of them with years of 
experience in the business, both in the eastern 
fields and in California, thus guaranteeing that 
all orders are properly filled — a point, by the way, 
often overlooked. 

The main offices of the company, as stated 
above, are located at 212 North Los Angeles 
street, Los Angeles, Cal. 



COMPARATIVE TABLE OF CALIFORNIA PRO- 
DUCTION. 



SANTA MARIA, CAL. 



The following table, which is self explanatory, 
will be of interest to all connected with the oil 
industry. It has been prepared with great care 
and will be found correct; not estimated. We 
believe it to be the first table published showing 
anything closer than approximate figures for the 
year's production: 

1902. 1903. 1904. 

Coalinga . .'. 500,750 2,138.058 5,114,000 

Lompoc and Santa 

Maria 116.500 208.S90 670,500 

Midway 50,000 29,200 910 

Sunset 144.200' 353,100 400,000 

McKittrick 639,500 1,353,500 1,875,925 

Kern River 8,872,115 16.342,100 17,500,000 

Summerland 94,550 131,000 120,000 

Newhall-Ventura .. 626,540 682,500 663,100 

Los Angeles 1,047,300 793,765 1,200,000 

Puente 127,550 125,200 56,000 

Whittier 559, 4S0 752,815 692,000 

Pullerton 1.195.015 1,427,700 147,500 

Total 13,973,500 24.337,828 29,805,525 

Increase in 1903, 10,364,328 barrels. 
Increase in 1904, 5,467,697 barrels. 
Daily average for 1902, 38,286 barrels. 
Daily average for 1903, 66,679 barrels. 
Daily average for 1904, 81,645 barrels. 



CALIFORNIA STATISTICS. 



Following are the oil statistics for the State 
of California for the year ending December 31st, 
1904. These figures are not estimated but are 
carefully compiled, taking the statistics of each 
company for a basis. They can be depended on 
as absolutely reliable. 

KERN RIVER. 

Wells producing Dec. 31 642 

Wells shut in 250 

Total production for 1904 17,500,000 

Barrels shipped during 1904 12,900,000 

Field stocks Dec. 31* 999,100 

Wells completed during 1904 97 

Wells drilling Dec. 31 9 

Wells abandoned during 1904 49 

New derricks' Dec. 31 5 

COALINCA. 

Wells producing 149 

Wells shut in 10 

Total production 5,114,000 

Barrels shipped 5,100,000 

Field stocks Dec. 31* 74,000 

Wells completed 60 



TFR 



I 

! . . . 25 

during 1904 21 

I I(> 

indoned during i • . . 2 

2 

MKITTRIlK. 

Wells shut in 

production 1,87 

Barrels shipped 

Field .31* I 

completed 14 

Wells drilling Dec 31 

Wells abandoned J 

'■•• .31 2 

Mill" m . 

Wells stmt in ;; 

Total production 'Mil 

Barrels shipped 910 

Pield stock Dec. 31* • 5,000 

Wells completed 5 

WVlls drilling Da. 31 6 

Wells abandoned 

New derricks I >ec. M 3 

SAN r \ MARl \ \\'li LOMPOC. 

Wells producing Dec. i\ 20 

Wells shut in 14 

Total production for 1904 670,500 

Barrels shipped during 1904 406,690 

Field stock Dec. 31* 200,000 

Wells completed during 1904 9 

Wells drilling Dec. 31 30 

Wells abandoned during 1904 2 

New derricks Dec. 31 10 

VENTURA. 

Wells producing 250 

Total production 518,000 

Barrels shipped 501,000 

Field stocks Dec. 31* ■ 60,000 

Wells completed . 10 

Wells drilling Dec. 31 4 

Wells abandoned 44 

New derricks Dec. 31 10 

NEWHALL. 

Wells producing 70 

Total production 145,100 

Barrels shipped 145,000 

Field stocks Dec. 31* 4,000 

Wells completed 3 

Wells drilling Dec. 31 2 

Wells abandoned 1 

New derricks Dec. 31 

LOS ANGELES. 

Wells producing 1,070 

Wells shut in 112 

Total production 1 ,200,000 

Barrels shipped 1 ,050,000 

Field stocks Dec. 31* 128,000 

Wells completed 49 

Wells drilling Dec. 31 25 

Wells abandoned 80 

New derricks Dec. 31 4 

u IIITTIER. 

Wells producing 100 

Total production 692,000 

Barrels shipped 594,000 

Field stocks Dec. 31* 135,000 

Wells completed 11 

Wells drilling Dec. 31 9 

Wells abandoned 9 

New derricks Dec. 31 4 

PUENTE. 

Wells producing 35 

Wells shut in 31 

Total production 56,000 

Barrels shipped 54,200 

Field stocks Dec. 31* 3,200 

Wells completed 

Wells drilling Dec. 31 1 

Wells abandoned 5' 

New derricks Dec. 31 

FULLERTON AND BREA CANYON. 

Wells producing 132 



FRESNO COUNTY ABSTRACT COMPANY 

Incorporated Under the Laws of California January SI, 1901. 

Capital Stock $100,000.00 

FUl_l_Y PAID UP 

SEARCHERS OF RE CORDS AND CONVEYANCE 

Abstracts of Title Carefully Compiled at Reasonable Rates. 



NO. 1115 K ST., 



FRESNO, CAL. 



SMITH, EMERY ®, CO. 



Chemical Engineers 




ANALYSES 

PF.TROLEUM --- Calorific Value, 
Fractional Distillation, Refining, Vis- 
cosity, Freezing,Candle Power, Burn= 
ing. Tests, Etc. Boiler Feed & Drink- 
ing Water. Umpire Work on Oil Contracts. 

83-85 New Montgomery Street 

SAN FRANCISCO 




CLOT & CRIST MACHINE CO. 

Designers and Builders of Special and Labor-saving Machinery 

Estimates Furnished on Power and Pumping Plants Complete 

Special Attention Paid to the Repairing of Steam Pumps and Oilier Machinery 

manufacturers of THE BEST PUMP ON EARTH 

For Water Works and Mining Purposes 
For Oil Pipe Lines and Oil Burning Plants 

Artesian Deep Well and Sinking Pumps 

Electric Driven Pumps of Every Kind 
AGENTS FOR 

3= Horse Power Stickney Gasoline Engine 

Telephone John 5<J6 



137=139 Beale Street, San Francisco 




Charles E. Ertz, President 



John Bragg, Supt. Charles A. .Brown, Secretary 



Bulls Head Oil Works 



Manufacturers of 



High-Grade Refined Products 



FROM 



CALIFORNIA CRUDE OIL 



Works at 

Bulls Head Point 

MARTINEZ 






City Office 
227 A. 229 California St. 
SAN FRANCISCO 



H. B. GUTHREY 

Oil Well Contractor 

Specifications furnished on wells of any depth 
■ in any country ==== 

WATER SHUT OFF IN OIL WELLS 

Many valuable oil properties in this state saved by our process 
which is sure and permanent 

Our references are our past customers 

H. B. GUTHREY, 

COALINGA, CAL. 



20 



PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 




R. P. WADDELL 

GENERAL AGENT FOR 

XRay and Dandy Windmills 



PUMPS, PIPING, TANKS, FRAMES, 

GALVANIZED STEEL AND WOOD TOWERS 

Aermotor Mills and Repairs 

ESTIMATES ON IRRIGAT ING OUTFITS 

35 Beale St., San Francisco 

Branch Office: 353 11th St.. Oakland, Cal. 

ADOLPH L. STONE 

Crude Oil and Asphalt Broker 

Contracts for Crude Oil in the Santa Maria, Kern River and Coalinga Districts 
California Asphalt Shipments arranged for all parts of the world 

All grades Asphalt for Street Paving, Roofing, Varnish Manufacturers, Etc. Samples on application 

Office, 137 Montgomery Street ... .C?s»r» Pranricrn f^al 

Mail Address, P. O. Box 2520 - - - Oai* * ranClSCO, V^at. 



■ 


FOR SALE. 


We manufacture the best 




lubricating oils for oil 


1000 shares Pinal Oil stock at $3.60 per share. 


drillers 


3000 shares Brookshire Oil stock at $1.00 per 


KING KEYSTONE OIL CO., 


share. 


204 Front St., San Francisco. 


W. E. BARNARD, 




476 Tenth Street, Oakland, California 



H 



KROHN 
WIRE ROPE SOCKET 



THE ONLY SOCKET USING A BALL CLUTCH 



LASTING QUALITIES UNEQUALLED 



PATENT 



CLUTCH 




DEVICE 




For Sale by ALL 

OIL WELL SUPPLY HOUSES 

LLEWELLYN IRON WORKS 

SOLE MANUFACTURERS 

LOS ANGELES, CAL. 

Write for Circular 



\ 




Total production 1,475,000 

Barrels shipped 1,429,000 

Field stocks Dec. 31* 77,760 

Wells completed 26 

Wells drilling Dec. 31" '. . . 22 

Wells abandoned 9 

New derricks Dec. 31 2 

SARGENTS. 

Wells producing 3 

Wells shut in ■ 2 

Total production 35,090 

Barrels shipped 25,190 

Field stocks Dec. 31* 9,800 

Wells completed 2 

Wells drilling Dec. 31 2 

Wells abandoned 13 

New derricks Dec. 31 1 

SUMMERLAND. 

Wells producing 200 

Total production 120,000 

Barrels shipped 120,000 

Field stocks Dec 31* 10,400 

Wells completed 1 

Wells drilling Dec. 31 2 

Wells abandoned 64 

New derricks Dec. 31 2 

HALFMOON BAY. 

Wells producing 8 

Total production 3,000 

Barrels shipped 

Field stocks Dec. 31* 1,000 

Wells completed 5 

Wells drilling Dec. 31 2 

Wells abandoned 

New derricks Dec. 31 2 

TOTAL. 

Wells producing t '2,777 

Wells shut in 590 

Total production 29,805,525 

Barrels shipped 24,735,000 

Field stocks Dec. 31* 1,977,260 

Wells completed 313 

Wells drilling.Dec. 31 178 

Wells abandoned 292 

New derricks Dec. 31 88 

* — Does not include storage of Pacific Coast 
Oil Company or Southern Pacific Railway Com- 
pany. 



Following is a report of California oil sta- 
tistics for the month of November: 

KERN RIVER. 

Wells producing 646 

Wells shut in 250 

Total production for November 1,402,000 

Barrels shipped 1,000,000 

Wells completed 4 

Wells drilling 9 

Wells abandoned 4 

New derricks 5 

Total field stocks* 999,000 

COALINGA. 

Wells producing 148 

Wells shut in 12 

Total production for November 534,000 

Barrels shipped 521,000 

Wells comnleted 5 

Wells drilling 45 

Wells abandoned 1 

New derricks 16 

Total field stocks* 75,000 

m'kittrick. 

Wells producing 65 

Wells shut in 48 

Total production for November .... 190,000 

Barrels shipped ' 188,500 

Wells comDleted 

Wells drilling . . . '. 2 

Wells abandoned 

New derricks 

Total field stocks* 122,000 

SUNSET. 

Wells producing 32 

Wells shut in 90 

Total production for November 21.000 

Barrels shipped 25,000 

Wells completed 

Wells drilling 17 



IFIC I >ll 



\\. 









nam 



ember. . . . 







I 







Wells 

Barrel 
WelU 
WelU 
Wells 



v M \RI V AND I 

producing 

shut in 

production ti>r November .... 
s shipped 

completed 

drilling 

abandoned 

derricks 

lield stocks" 



M n HALL. 
Wells producing 

Total production tor November. 

Barrels shipped 

Wells completed 

Wells drilling 

Wells abandoned 

New derricks 

Total lielil stocks* 



LOS AM. i [ i S. 

Wells producing 

Wells shut in 

I otal production tor November. 

Barrels shipped 

Wells completed 

Wells drilling 

Wells abandoned 

New derricks 

Total field stocks* 



I'llNTE. 

Wells producing 

Total production for November. 

Barrels shipped 

Wells completed 

Wells drilling 

Wells abandoned 

New derricks 

Total Held stocks* 



FULI.ERTOX AXD BREA CANYON. 

Wells producing 

'Total production for November 

Barrels shipped 

Wells completed 

Wells drilling 

Wells abandoned 

New derricks 

Total field stocks* 

WHITTIER. 

Wells producing 

Total production for November 

Barrels shipped 

Wells completed 

Wells drilling 

Wells abandoned 

New derricks 

Total field stocks* 



SUMMERLAND. 

Wells producing 

Total production for November. 

Barrels shipped 

Wells completed 

Wells drilling 

New derricks 

"Total field stocks* 



SARCENTS. 

Wells producing 

Wells shut in 

Total production for November. 

Barrels shipped 

Wells completed 

Wells drilling 

Wells abandoned 

New derricks 

Total Held stocks* 



VENTURA. 

Wells producing 

'Total production for November. 
Barrels shipped 







u 


5 



20 

14 

40,000 
2 

7 

1 

59, 

63 

11,011 

12,000 

1 

_> 

n 



5,000 

1,080 

112 

125,000 

97,000 

3 

21 





127,000 

31 

3,000 

2,000 



1 





3,200 

130 

121,187 

120,000 

25 

22 

4 

1 

78,000 

100 

46,000 

46,000 



10 





134,000 

200 

9,100 

8,900 



1 

2 

10,000 

3 

2 

6,000 

6,000 



2 



1 

9,800 

250 
46,100 
46,000 



WESTERN COOPERAGE CO. 

■ANUPACn Rl ifs ill 

STAVES and HEADING 

For Both Tiaht nn.i Blah Work. 



OUR SPECIALTIES ARE 

White Spruce Sam and Heading fir Tight Barrel States and 
all ready to set up lor Pish. Heading lor Oil. tard, Pork, 
Pickles or lard packages ot Bee) rj c rj c 
injsiie. H ' 'ooo 

Fir Slack Barrel Staves and Heading for Asphalt, Lime 
Cement and Bottle Barrels. 



Prompt and Courteous Attention to att inquiries. 



MILLS at Aberdeen, Wash, and Houllon, Ore. 



lALINGA \l w COM PI 

c\rr published has just In 

famous up iw & Hill, 

Bakersiirld, Cat. Each pipe line is carefully 
surveyed and each well carefully lot 

land holdings have been brought Strict]} up to 

Utd the map is ;i fine specimen ot the map- 
makers' art. It you are interested in the Cod 
inga field you should no! he without one, 
for large blueprints, $1.50 each. Order direct 

from the makers or from the Pacific < >n. Rjb 
porter, 318 Pine street, San Francisco. 




Lacy Manufacturing Company 



Manufacturers of 




Steel Water Pipe 
General Sheet 
Iron Works 
Oil Well Casing 
Oil Stills 

OIL STORAGE AND WAGON TANKS 

Works: Cor. New Main and Date streets, P. O. Box 231, Station C. 

Baker Block Telephone Main 196 

Office, 334 North Main Street, Los Angeles, pal, 

BATES' 

PATENT CASING TONGS 




1416-1426 19th St., Bakersfield, Cal. 



Fills a long-felt want. No more need of 
pole and rope for screwing up casing. Bates 
Tongs can be applied to the casing anywhere 
in driving or pulling without danger of Injury 
or parting casing. 

Set No. 1, with any two size jaws from g$/k 
to 13 }4 inches. 

Set No. 2, with any two size jaws fro-n 4 to 
qYi inches. 




CAR TANKS AND STORAGE H"ANKS 

FOR ALL USES 

We Carry in Stock Car Tanks of following sizes: We Carry in Stock Stoiage Tanks for Oil 

6,000 Gallons of all sizes up loand including 

7 000 " 55,000 BARRELS 

8 OOO " 

and can mount on'wood or steel nnderframts. Oil Ref ineries Complete Our Specially 

WARREN CITY BOILER WORKS 

OFFICE! and WORKS:-WARREN, OHIO. 



22 



PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 




5 
4 
1 
60,000 



Wells completed 

Wells drilling 

Wells abandoned 

New derricks 

Total field stocks* 

TOTAL. 

Wells producing 2,768 

Wells shut in 594 

Total production for November 2,594,398 

Barrels shipped 2,1 13,200 

Wells completed 40 

Wells drilling 159 

Wells abandoned 13 

New derricks 29 

Total field stocks* 1,932,000 

* — Does not include storage of Pacific Coast 
Oil Company or Southern Pacific Railway Com- 
pany. 



CALIFORNIA STOCK AND OIL EX- 
CHANGE. 



.27 

.36 
.37 

.20 

.30 

.20 

.80 

.07 



The following were stock sales in the Cali- 
fornia Stock and Oil Exchange in the formal 
session held for the week ending Wednesday, 
December 28 : 
Associated — 

11,700 shares at 

Apollo — 

200 shares at 

2,000 shares at 

Chicago Crude — 

100 shares at 

Independence — 

700 shares at 

Junction — 

50 shares at 

Monte Cristo — 

1,600 shares at 

Occidental — 

400 shares at 

Sterling — 

450 shares at 2.00 

S. F & McKittrick— 

100 shares at 2.50 

Twenty-Eight — 

30 shares at 12.50 

Following are the latest quotations for stocks 
of oil companies listed on the California Stock 
and Oil Exchange: 

Bid. 

Alma 

Apollo 35 

Ass. Oil Co. Stk. Tr. Cer. .26 

California-Standard 18 

Caribou 6 . 87!/2 

Central Point Con 69 

Chicago Crude 22 

Claremont 

Coalinga & Pacific 50 

Forty 45 

Four . .55 

Giant 26 

Hanford 

Home 41 

Illinois Crude , 

Imperial 

Independence 29 

Junction 20 

Kern 5.00 

Kern (New) 

Kern River 

Linda Vista 16 

Maricopa . . . : 

McKittrick 10 

Monarch of Arizona 

Monte Cristo 80 

Nevada County 

Occidental of W. Va 07 

Oil City Petroleum ' .68 

S. F. & McKittrick...- 

Senator 70 

Sovereign 31 

Superior 03 

Thirty-Three 6.25 

Toltec 22 

Twenty-Eight 

Union 

United Petroleum 100.00 

West Shore 2.50 

Wolverine .50 



Asked. 
.80 
.40 
.27 
.19 
7.87^ 



.82^ 



200.00 
.42 
.70 
16.50 
.30 
.21 

"!30 
12.50 

.22 

.10 

"^30 

.82% 

.40 

.08 
' .70 
3.00 

'33 

"o\25 

13 !66 

70.00 



Flow of Natural Gas 
Increased by . . . 

Cooper's Gas Lift 

Also flow of water 
or oil Increased and 
gas saved 

A. S. COOPER, C.E., 



219 Crocker Building 
San Francisco, Cal. 



WB SELL 

BARLOW & HILL 

UP-TO- 
DATE . 



MAPS 



WHICH ABB THE ONI Y 

RELIABLE MAP PUBLISHED 



Large Blue Prints, $1.50 

Book containing Small Indexed Maps 

of all the California Fields, each 50 

Per Dozen 5.00 

PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 

318 PINE STREET 

San Francisco 



..OIL TANKS.. 

Oil Stills, Car Tanks, Riveted Pipe, Storage Tanks of 
every capacity and every description. Write for Estimates 

WM. GRAVER TANK WORKS 

77 Jackson Boulevard - CHICAGO, ILL. 

We Promote, Finance and Incorporate 

Let us show you the advantages of incorporating your business or enterprise. 
If you need money to enlarge your business, permit us to secure it for you, by selling 
stock through our Eastern correspondents. 

CONSOLIDATED AUDITING COMPANY 

307 to 310 Mills Building, San Francisco. 
Telephone Bush 849. 

WRITE US TO-DAY ! 
If you want to invest your money in a sound business proposition where you are sure 
to receive ten dollars for every one dollar invested 

BUY BUFFALO-CALIFORNIA OIL STOCK. 
This company is incorporated under a special act of Congress providing for the incor- 
poration of companies in the District of Columbia, making our stock absolutely non-assessable 
We hold some of the most valuable oil property in the well known 

HALFMOON BAY DISTRICT, 
San Mateo County, California, 
Now possessing many fine oil wells producing 52° to 55° gravity oil. But we cannot tell it all 
here. Write us for full particulars. 

Correspondence with reliable brokers and agents solicited. 

BUFFALO-CALIFORNIA OIL CO., 

Fletcher Block, 

Livermore, California. 

C. V. Hall Iron Works 



(LOCATION 




OLINDA, ORANGE CO., CAL.) 

POSTOFFICE ADDRESS, Route No. 2. 
FULLERTON. CAL. 

Los Angeles Office, 222 Wilcox Building, 
LOS »NGELES, CAL. 

The C. V. H. Chain Tongs can be had through 
any dealer in oil well supplies. 

These tongs are made of the very best steel, 
in any size, and always give satisfaction. 

Manufacturers or users of chain tongs do so 
at their own risk, in any infringements of 
Patent No. 438,1T7, the ownership of 
which belongs to the undersigned. 

CHARLES VICTOR HALL. 




PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 



Vol. 6. No. lO 



San Francisco, Cal., Saturday, Jan. 7, 1905 



Price lO Cents 



PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 

Published Weekly. 
The ( >il Authority of the 

lifomia Petroleum Miners' 

Maria K. Winn, Proprietor. 
I . S. Eastman, Editor and Manager. 



I) EDITOR] \l. rooms 
>I8 Pine Street - - San Francisco, California 
Telephone, Bush 

TERMS. 

One Year $2.50 

Six Months 1.50 

Three Months 1 . 00 

Single Copies 10 

STRICTLY IN ADVANCE. 



Money should be sent by Postal Order, Draft 
or Registered Letter, addressed to Pacific Oil 
REPORTER, 318 Pine Street, San Francisco, rooms 
31-32-33. Communications must be accompanied 
by writer's name and address, not necessarily for 
publication, but as a guarantee of good faith. 

Entered in the Postoffice at San Francisco, Cal- 
ifornia, as second class matter. 

Latest Quotations 



The prices offered by the Pacific Coast Oil 
Company for spot California crude oil at the 
wells are as follows: 

COALINGA. 

Price 
Gravity at 60 deg. temperature. per barrel. 

( )il nf 22 deg., up to, but not including 24. .$0.20 
Oil of 24 deg., up to, but not including 25 . . .30 
Oil of 25 deg., up to, but not including 26. . .35 
Oil of 26 deg., up to, but not including 27 . . .40 
Oil of 27 deg., up to, but not including 28 . . .45 
Oil of 28 deg., up to, but not including 29. . .50 
Oil of 29 deg., up to, but not including 30. . .55 
The Associated Oil Company is offering 17^2 
cents for fuel oil. 

SANTA MARIA. 

Gravity at 60 deg. Price per barrel 

Temperature. at Port Harford. 

25 deg., up to, but not including 26 $0.50 

26 deg., up to, but not including 27 55 

27 deg., up to, but not including 28 60 

28 deg., up to, but not including 29 65 

29 deg., up to, but not including 30 70 

30 deg., up to, but not including 31 75 

31 deg., up to, but not including 32 80 

32 deg. and up 85 

KERN RIVER. 

Fuel Oil, 14 deg. gravity or better 81. 

EASTERN QUOTATIONS. 

Pennsylvania $1 .60 

Tiona 1.75 

Corning ' 1 -37 

New Castle 1.47 

North Lima 1-07 

South Lima 1 . 02 

Indiana 1 .01 

Somerset 1.01 

Ragland 60 

Petrolea (Ont.) 1.53 

KANSAS-INDIAN TERRITORY, 
of 32 degrees gravity $0.87 



Oil 
Oil 

Oil 
Oil 
Oil 

Oil 

Oil 

Oil 
Oil 



of 311/; degrees gravity 82 

of 31 degrees gravity 77 

of 30 !/L> degrees gravity 72 

of 30 degrees gravity 67 

of 2 {: " j degrees gravity 62 

of 29 degrees gravity ^7 

nf 28V. degrees gravity 52 

of 28 degrees gravit" 47 



Oil has been discovered near Carlsbad, Nevi 
Mex o upon a great plateau, four 

or five thousand feel above the flight of sea gulls, 
that has been for mam years known as the "Land 
oshen" among the great cattle barons ol 
New Mexico the streams began to run dry and 
there was a shortage of water for the vast herds 
that browsed the rich herbage of these lands. 
This shortage in water forced herdsmen to dig 
wells, thinking probabl) thej could strike arte- 
sian water. One large well was driven down 

some 200 feet, and it commenced spouting oil — 

ular Pennsylvania oil, 4(> di [rei 
really the highest priced oil on the market, but 

the cattlemen were disgusted, instead of elated. 
Thej plugged up the well and bored again, and 
still again, and still again. Finally they com- 
menced nutting down wells, stopping short of 200 
feet, putting in pumps and pumping water for 
their stock, thoroughly disgusted from the stand- 
point of cowmen, that the water should be 
spoiled with petroleum. The oil kept oozing 
out and filtering through the rocks, and down 
into the old creek bed, and the news filtered in 
every direction from Carlsbad, New Mexico. 
This all happened less than six weeks ago. Men 
by the score are hurrying into the district from 
Pennsylvania, Lima, O., and Indiana points, while 
Kansas is simply depopulating herself in rushing 
into this new territory. A commendable fact 
about this new oil discovery of New Mexico is 
that the land can be had for the taking. As one 
party said, "It's a poor man's country." Not 
only this, but the territory is large and there is 
no reason why a few months' successful opera- 
tions, even if half of the Manchusen tales that 
are told in regard to this rich oil section are true, 
will not witness a dozen, or perhaps a score of 
new millionaires in the United States. 



For the first fourteen days of the present 
month, the daily runs from the Kansas and Ter- 
ritory oil fields have averaged 23,021 barrels a 
day, while the deliveries to the refineries of Ne- 
odesha and Kansas City have average only 5,- 
079 barrles. This left a difference or surplus out- 
put of 17,941 barrels a day, which had to be 
stored up in iron tanks for future delivery. The 
stocks at the close of the month were 4,629,452 
barrels. The gain of 251,183 barrels up to 
December 14 will make the total stocks at the 
latter date 4,680,635 barrels. The completion 
of the pipe line to Whiting. Indiana, will furnish 
an outlet for this surplus in the Eastern oil mar- 
kets. 

Despite the temporary depression that has ex- 
isted for some months in the oil business in Cali- 
fornia, the payment of dividends has continued, 
as shown by the report of the San Francisco Oil 
Exchange. During November the companies 
whose stock is entered there paid out no less than 
$59,386, which brings the grand total of divi- 
dends paid to December 1 up to $5,609,206. 
None of the companies in anv of the southern 
fields, with the exception of the Union and 
United Petroleum, are represented on the north- 
ern exchanges. The Union has, during its ex- 
istence, paid out a total of $1,485,566, the high- 
est of anv company in the State, while among 
other large payers are the Reed Crude, with a 



total i ii; the Imperial with 

: the Homi 10; the 

Kern the Thirty-Third, 

''"■ V( ' and the I 

ral years. 



ingredients of 



A subscriber asks. What are the 

signal oil ? 

Signal oil in general is a mixtun of an animal 

bIe O' 1 W'th pel, oleum. Some manu- 
al use lard oil and petroleum. 
informed that others use co 
the manufacture being i, la 're of a 

secret. Gill, in his "Oil An 
lowing "Specification for Signal Oil!" 

"This grade of oil shall he prime white in 
" lor, shall not contain less than 40 per cent by 
"eight of prime lard oil, and shall show a flash- 
ing point nor below 200 degrees F., and a burn- 
ing point not above 300 degrees. The test will be 
made in an open vessel by heating the oil not less 
than 15 degrees per minute, and applying the 
test (lame even 7 degrees, beginning at 193 de- 
grees. 

"When heated to a temperature of 450 degrees, 
and held there for 5 minutes, the oil must i 
clear and transparent, showing hut a slight dark- 
ening and no separation of flocculent or other mat- 
ter, either at this temperature or on cooling. The 
gravity may be from 31 to 34 degrees Baume. 
Oil will not be received which is cloudy from the 
presence of glue or suspended matter of any. 
kind." 



Recent reports from Humble, Texas, were to 
the effect that work was progressing on all the 
wells, and that there had been no more blowouts. 
There are a number of other wells being started 
in the vicinity of operations as well as at widely 
divided points about the hill and the flat, and 
it is evident that oil men are deti ui 
bring the Humble gusher in, and tha th mis- 
haps and the drawbacks owing to the enormous 
gas pressure have only whetted their appetities. 
The big companies are still making contracts for 
tankage and pipe lines to different tanks about 
the field. Arrangements are about completed for 
the placing of the pump on the Granberry-Staiti 
well, and this will he utilized by the refineries, 
and the first oil of paraffine base from the Texas 
coast country will find its way to the market. 



. ~ 

A band of about fifteen or twenty masked 

men, further disguised with old ragged clothing 

and with their horses covered with blankets, 

dynamited the pipe line of the Kansas Natural 

Gas Company where it crosses the public hi 

ways near Liberty, Kansas. There were fivi 

plosions, beginning about 12 o'clock and fol 

ing each other about half an hour apart. 

charges caused great damage, entile 

the pipe line where the explosions occurred. The 

places blown up were probabl \ about h 

apart. Big charges of 

were used, the charge in eai h up the 

line and blowing great holes in thi I und 

Mnn.es in the neighborhood were shaken to their 

foundations and a few window lights were 

broken. 



PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 



Pumping Oil, Tar and 
Other Heavy Liquids 

In many industries it is necessary to force 
heavy, viscous liquids through pipes. This in- 
volves difficulties not encountered in ordinary 
pumping, and requires machinery special in de- 
sign and construction. When the liquid is heavy 



and the one in the background working under its 
normal load. They were built by. the Deane 
Steam Pump Company of Holyoke, Mass., and 
are of the standard triplex type of that com- 
pany, fitted with ball valves peculiarly adapted 
to this service. The exclusive use of gate valves 
in the piping system is also interesting. A, very 
flexible power connection is obtained by the use 




Fig.1. 



but not adhesive, as in the case of heavy oils, 
the action can be made fairly satisfactory and 
efficient by enlarging the valve openings, mak- 
ing the parts of the pump heavier and so ar- 
ranging the passages of the pump that there is 
little liability of choking or clogging. When, 
however, the liquid is a fluid at high tempera- 
tures and a gelatinous adhesive paste or a rub- 
bery solid, clinging to all surfaces and choking 
openings through which it should pass, as the 
temperature is lowered, a design differing ma- 
terially from the ordinary pump must be used. 

Tar, molasses and cocoa liquor present more 
obstacles to pumping than any other substances 
which it has been found feasible to move in this 
manner. Each of these liquids thickens into 
an almost solid mass when cold, rendering it 
very difficult to start the pump, if some special 
provision is not made and ample power provided. 
Another action which must be taken into ac- 
count is the concentration of the area of the 
passages and valves as the liquid cools and the 
consequent throttling which interferes with the 
liquid's passage and which the pump is forced 
to overcome. The skin friction of a liquid of 
this ( kind creates heat, enough to partially alle- 
viate this tendency to throttling when the ve- 
locity of the substance is maintained above a 
certain point and the pipe is not in such a posi- 
tion that the surrounding air will lower the 
temperature of the liquid below the solidifying 
point. Although not a common practice, it is 
well to lag all exposed piping used for convey- 
ing heavy oils or other substances of a similar 
nature. 

Gas tar has a number of characteristics ren- 
dering it exceptionally difficult to pump. Its 
condition varies from a solid to a penetrating 
fluid within a small range of temperature. Two 
pumps which have proved very efficient in lifting 
and forcing gas tar were installed a short time 
ago at the plant of the Maryland Steel Company 
of Sparrows Point, Md. Fig. I shows the pumps 
in position, the one in the foreground being idle 



of. the Reynolds silent chain and , a four-pole 
alternating current three horse-power motor. 
The gearing consists of an eighteen-tooth pinion 



of an inch wide and one and one-half inches long. 
It transmits the three horse-power gererated at 
950 feet per minute, giving an excellent efficiency 
when the service is considered. 

A liquid peculiarly difficult to handle is oil- 
refinery tar, which is usually very hot when it 
reaches the pump. There is a large percentage 
of suspended particles of various sizes present, 
in this tar and also a certain amount of unre- 
fined paraffin. The tar is sometimes heated to 
a temperature of 300 degrees, but quickly cooh 
off if not properly handled, and coats the retain- 
ing valves and walls with layers of an adhesive 
substance closely resembling finely divided par- 
ticles cf coke. To overcome the difficulties the 
ordinary pump arrangement and design is ma- 
terially changed. 

Fig. II shows a special designed pump in- 
stalled by the Deane Company for handling oil- 
refinery tar at the works of the Atlantic Refin- 
ing Company in Philadelphia. By a new ar- 
rangement, exceptionally large valve areas are 
made available, the valves being designed to per- 
mit the passage of the substance pumped with 
the least possible frictional resistance. The suc- 
tion, discharge and pulsation chambers can be 
taken apart without unnecessary expenditure of 
time or labor, and each is in a position where it 
can be readily reached for cleaning. The pump 
is of the triplex type, as shown in the figure, 
and is fitted with ball valves, which thorough 
test has proved .best adapted for the passage of 
heavy substances. There are a number of large 
hand holes for cleaning the valves. The figures 
shows the rigid cross-head guide system and the 
strong design of the chambers, rods, pistons and 
bearings. 

Machinery which will pump these adhesive 
oils and other similar substances can be used in 




Fig. 2. 



running at 950 revolutions per minute and a 
120-tooth wheel running at 142 revolutions per 
minute. 'The chain used has links three-fourths 



many industries, and will save the laborious pro- 
cesses by which this class of work is generally ac- 
complished. 



PACIFIC Oil. ki P( tRTER 



Big Oil Land Transfer 



On Thursdx] tl><- \.\t^i oil land transfer ever 

made in tl mty field took place in this 

>lien thr Atlantic & Pacific Oil Company's 

properties were sold to the Pittsburg-Sai- 

my for a ci-vn-.idrr.it ion ranging tar 
up into the thousands. 

The deal, which had been on the tapis tor 
insumited through Un- 
representative of the Oil Well Supply 
Company of this city, being closed at North & 
9 bank, where a neat fortune changed 
bands. The Hearst estate and R. V. Ellis of 
California, represented the Atlantic & Pacific, 
and Mr. A. V. Taylor of Salt Lake, the Pitts- 
burg concern. Mr. Taylor is the company's chief 
counsel and general manager for the Salt Lake 
and Southern railroad. He returned home 
Thursday after the deal was closed. 

The properties transferred include three-quar- 
ters on section 22-15-118; three quarters on sec- 
tion 24-15-118; 200 acres on section 26-I5-IT8; 
all of section 6-14-1 1 7 ; one quarter on section 10- 
14-1 18; two quarters on section 12-14-118; three 
quarters on section 2-14-118, making a total of 



even been 
man) years, The onl) , lt the 

Indiana field was nevei 
rn lield. 

irding to tradition oil and g.is were known 

to have existed in Indiana by (he Indians. They, 

however, nevei knew the value of oil and gas 

and never used either to any extent. But it is 
quite certain that the] did use both tor some 
PUipM ling to letters written from this 

country to France bj Gasper de Portals, a French 
friar, who labored with a small band of mission- 
aries in Indiana, the Indians had utilized "an oil 
that they found about the mineral springs in the 
southeastern part of the state." 

Oil was never really discovered until the great 
oil excitement oi 1862, when the entire country 
w .is thrown into excitement by the discover] oi 
the product in Pennsylvania. Oil was then 
wavering above the JsS mark and wells were 
pumping as high as 80 barrels a day. The wells 
could not supply the demand, and speculators 
who realized the value of the Pennsylvania Held 
sent men all over the country to make investiga- 
tions. ( )il was found in Indiana about 1802. 
It was found in the mineral springs of Otter 



com m 

to arrive about 

realize « I . 
sihilit,. ! thr influx has real 

gun. Their is no doubt that the Indiana field 
will I as the Pennsylvania field, the 

vetei 



Petroleum Prospects of 
Japan 

In I87S the present emperor of Japan made a 
triii oi his dominion and when he reached a 
town named Tikado, in the northern province of 
Echigo, be was shown a model of an American 
oil derrick ami instructed in its use. He became 
verj much interested in the matter and, return- 
ing to his capital, directed his secretary of state 
to visit the oil fields and report to him. Up to 
this time all the oil that was produced was car- 
ried in barrels on the backs of the workmen to 
the crude refineries that were in existence in even.' 
locality where oil was found. 

In 1884 an iron foundei in Tokio was engaged 
to lay a pipe line more than a mile* long and 
this was afterwards extended to five miles. This 
so exasperated the men that they threatened to 



Exports of domestic mineral oil from the Pacific ports of the United States and shipment; to Hawaii and Alaska during the month of 

November, 1904: 

Mineral, Crude. Napthas, Ele. Illuminating;. Lubricating;. Residuum. 

CUSTOMS DISTRICTS. Gallons. Dollars. Gallons. Dollars. Gallons. Dollars. Gallons. Dollars.Barrels. Dollars. 



Alaska 








13,400 


370 

1,450 

440 


137 

334 

40 


790 
4,619 

510 
7,322 


198 

1,267 

86 

1,293 


1,849 

120 

3,793 


371 

60 

1,317 










399,000 


27 109 


Total 


..... 399,000 


13,400 


2,260 


511 


13,241 


2,844 


5,762 


1,748 


27 109 


SHIPMENTS 


TO 


HAWAII. 


2,667,000 


88,900 


21,087 


2,423 


168,750 


22,250 


20,945 


9,005 


■ 


SHIPMENTS 


TO 


ALASKA. 






1,140 


261 


14,410 


3,308 


2,884 
566 


1,008 
359 















Reported expressly for Pacific Oil Reporter by Department of Commerce and Labor, Bureau of Statistics, December 23, 1904. 

J. N. Whitney, 

Chief Clerk of Bureau. 



2,760 acres, together with seven rigs, machinery 
and all other belongings. 

Mr. D. H. McMillan, manager for the Pitts- 
burg-Salt Lake Company, was in the city when 
the deal was closed and has taken charge of the 
property and will make arrangements for exten- 
sive development operations the coming spring, 
the properties purchased by his company being 
among the richest in the field. 

This new company comes highly recommended 
and backed by sufficient capital to carry on ex- 
tensive development work, and their coming bids 
fair to awaken activity never before witnessed in 
this field. The gentlemen connected with the 
company pronounce our high grade oil the richest 
in the country, not excepting the Pennsylvania 
product. We welcome the new company into 
the field and trust its success will be of the high- 
est order. — Evanston, Wyo., Press. 



Early Petroleum Discov- 
eries in India 



If you ask the average citizen or oil worker 
how long ago the discovery of oil was made in 
Indiana he would probably reply that Indiana 
oil was discovered less than ten years ago. 

Vet oil is no newer to Indiana than it is to 
Pennsylvania. In fact, the two fields were dis- 
covered about the same time, and if anything, 
oil was known to have existed in Indiana before 



Fork and West Fork, in Crawford county. 
Wells were sunk, but they proved to be a poor 
venture and they were abandoned. 

It remained for Vigo county to produce the 
first oil well of the state. 

While drilling an artesian well in that county 
in 1865 oil was found at a depth of 1,630 feet. 
The crude product was found in large quantities, 
but it was mixed with salt and sulphur water 
and they did but little with it. In 1888, how- 
ever, the famous Phoenix well was drilled in 
Vigo county and for over 12 years the well pro- 
duced an average of 1,000 barrels a month. 

The well attracted considerable attention and 
about forty companies were formed. Only 
about half of these began to invest, and the ex- 
citement gradually died down. 

Many of the older producers, who are now 
in the local field, remember distinctly the "oil 
craze" in Indiana. Most of them were busily 
engaged at Triumph Hill and many other places 
made notable by the discovery of oil in Pennsyl- 
vania. The excitement in the East was at fever 
heat at about that time, they say. Every one 
was making money so fast that only a few cared 
to leave the field. 

When Pennsylvania began to wane, operators, 
oil workers, speculators and everybody else that 
go to make an oil field drifted westward into 
Ohio. Some went south to Virginia, but the 
hulk went to the Lima fields and now they are 



tear up the lines. The source of their livelihood 
had been destroyed by the operation. 

From this time on the business increased with 
great haste. In the province named they arc 
now producing 1,500 barrels a day and this is only 
one of several developments, though it is said to 
be the largest one. 

Representatives of the various companies from 
time to time have visited America for the pur- 
pose of studying the business and making investi- 
gations generally. They have returned in all 
instances endowed with the necessary intelligence 
to bring the operations on a par with those of 
America. 

During the past five years there has been a 
great deal of concentration of forces throughout 
the entire range of developments. The refining 
and pipe line interests have fallen into the hands 
of one company — the Holden Oil Compan)'. This 
company has a capital of something like a million 
and a half, the greater portion of which is said 
to be held by the Standard Oil Company of 
New York. 

This companj', in conjunction with the Japan 
Petroleum Company, has within the past two 
years opened the Nagamine field in the province 
of Nishiyama. Here there is a daily production 
of 1,000 barrels a day. The wells and the re- 
fining works, however, are all in the hands of 
these two companies. 

The International Oil Company has head- 



PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 



quarters in the suburbs of Neoyotsu, the termi- 
nal of the Hoga and Shenyetsul lines of railway. 
The company has a capital of 10,000,000 yen. 
This is the largest oil company in the empire. It 
is stated that although ostensibly a joint enter- 
prise of Japanese and American capital, it is de 
facto an off-shoot of the Standard Oil Company 
of New York. The success of this organization 
at the beginning was not inspiring. But it has 
continued to absorb one after another of the 
smaller concerns until it is now stated that it 
virtually controls the destinies of the trade in 
that island empire. The Holden Company above 
referred to became a part of the International 



Fuel Report for 1904 



COAL AND OIL. 

The total amount of coal imported into Cali- 
fornia this year, 1,051,072 tons, being 164,482 



reduced values set on same, coal has to be sold 
at comparatively low figures, when used for steam 
purposes ; when utilized for domestic purposes 
a fair value is set upon it, as oil ceases to com- 
pete as a house fuel, until the principal obstacles 
are overcome, viz., the elimination of smell and 
smoke, and the increase of danger. There has 
been a pronounced decrease of Australian coal im- 
ports this year, caused mainly coal carriers being 
unable to find profitable employment on arrival 
here, and present conditions are now compelling 
a large number of vessels to return to the colo- 
nies in ballast. This naturally forces shippers 
to pay generous freight rates on coal from New- 
castle, N. S. W., and causes a marked shrinkage 
of amount delivered. Ruling prices have been 
very uniform during the year, and consumers 
cannot complain of paying extreme rates, as the 
profits are very meagre when the cost of han- 
dling same is considered. 



30,000,000 barrels, against 24,000,000 for 1903, 
and 13,000,000 for 1902. This immense in- 
crease shows the present status of our State for oil 
as a fuel producer, and its standing as a formid- 
able competitor to coal locally. About three mil- 
lions of barrels have been used for illuminating, 
lubricating, etc., and about 500,000 barrels of 
crude oil on roads. About ten million barrels are 
now in tankage, being held in reserve, evidencing 
that our future requirements are generally pro- 
vided for. The present condition of the fuel 
situation for the demands of our factories is a 
most gratifying one, and promises generous profits 
for the coming year, as the asking prices for oil 
are most favorable, with every likelihood of a sus- 
tenance of present values. 



Petroleum production in the year just closed 
has been greater than ever before. It is conser- 
vatively estimated that the total production from 
all the wells of this country has been close to 
120,000,000 barrels in 1904. This is fully 20,- 
000,000 barrels in excess of the consumption, 
which is estimated at about 100,000,000 barrels. 




Property 



tons less than last year, would intimate that our 
manufacturing interests are declining, when the 
quantity of coal fuel is diminishing, but such is 
not the case. For example, the output of oil for 
the year will foot up nearly ten millions of bar- 
rels in excess of 1903, the major portion of 
which has been used by railway companies and in- 
dustrial interests, showing by actual computa- 
tion that our local manufacturers have largely 
increased their business, and a great many new 
industries are being introduced, being encouraged 
to do so by the low prices of fuel oil. At the 
beginning of last year (January 15), the duty of 
67 cents per ton on foreign coal was replaced on 
same, being an impediment to the success of steam 
consumers generally. The needs of the Treasury 
Department are not so urgent that the acquisition 
of the small amount of duties would be of much 
avail, yet at least 20 per cent of the original cost 
at point of shipment is demanded by the Govern- 
ment, and proves very onerous to the consumer. 
With fuel oil as a competitor, and the present 



of the Midway Oil Company of Oregon; Midway District. 

The various sources from which we have de- In other words, the production has been gaining 
rived our coal supplies are as follows : on the consumption at the rate of about one- 

1901 1902 1903 1904 

Tons Tons Tons Tons 

British Columbia 710,330 591,732 289,890 335,137 

Australia 175,959 197,328 276,186 148,409 

English and Welsh 52,270 95,621 61,580 64,664 

Scotch 3,600 3,495 1,666 

Eastern (Cumberland and Anthracite) 27,370 24,133 13,262 29,055 

Seattle (Washington) 240,574 165,237 127,819 139,063 

Tacoma (Washington) 433,817 209,358 256,826 182^313 

Mount Diablo, Coos Bay and Tesla 143,318 111,209 84,277 96,520 

Japan, and Rocky Mountains by rail 51,147 47,380 102,219 54,245 

Total 1,834,785 1.445,598 1,215,554 1,051,072 

To secure a complete statement of the entire fifth of the actual yearly market needs. This 

coal consumption of California, I have been is due to the great increase in production from 

obliged to include deliveries at Port Los Angeles the Kansas fields, which have doubled their out- 

and San Diego by water, which have been added put during the past year. Kansas and Indian ter- 

m the above sources of supply. The total ritory production is increasing at a rapid rate, 

amount received by water at those ports foot up and the serious problem is, how can it be cared 

99,528 tons. f or . Not until the new pipe line to Whiting, 

fuel oil. Ind., is completed will this problem be solved, if 

The oil products for 1904 will aggregate fully then. 









Petroleum War in 

Germany 



to the 
;>rci<r- 

petroleum 

n the 

• that the I rtnon- 

itnous and 

rj tor 

: thai preferential rate* have been 

r shipments of Russian petroleum to 

Leipzig and Dresden and that hence 

r to extend this advantage to the ini- 



roduct 
m: thr I 

• mda Ulan, 

tons, 
.11 Oil for Germany.- Much h< 
In Germany in the development of the 
tnian oil fields. In 1899 one well alone is 
ted to have produced 70 wagon loads 
per day tor a period of thirty three days. The 
oil fields lie at no great distance from Germany. 
l"hc Danube offers ideal river transportation 
into the heart of German territory. Thr 
of production of 100 kilograms (220.46 pounds) 



of the 

ist the 

plaints against tl 

man Imerican Petroleum Company, which es- 

hed headquarters at Chemnitz last year, are 

numerous. Tin's company drew all the local 

trade to itself by entering into contracts with 

local dealers "i | rtain amount of dam- 

■ ho agreed to give up the petro- 

trade for th Bj inaugurating the 

system of tank wagons for all the neighboring 
cities, among which are Limbach, Oederan, An- 
naberg, Mai Hohenstein and Glauchau, 

d the entire local wholesale trade to the 

wall. At the present time the company delivers to 







1 







East Side Pumping Station of P. C. O. Co., Coalinga. 



portant petroleum consuming district nf Chem- 
nitz. Negotiations having the extension of this 
privilege in view have been inaugurated with 
good prospects of success. 

Germanj has foi manj years been watching 
with apprehension the [rowing influence of the 
Standard Oil Company) and is putting forth 
every effort to find son - soun oi effective com- 
petition. Figures are apparently against her, 
but judging from numerous articles which re- 
cently appeared in leading papers all over the 
country, she bases her hopi on the de- 

velopment of the other great oil fields of the 
world, those of Russia, Austria-Hungary and 
Rouniania, chiefly. 

In 1902 Russia supplied over 11,500,000 tons. 



of refined Roumanian oil is estimated at 3 francs 
(57.9 cents), which is lower, it is claimed, than 
in any other country. Moreover, the Roumanian 
crude oil, it is claimed, produces 6.1.3 per cent 
of refined oil, while the Pennsylvania oil pro- 
duces but 47 per cent. 

Austrian Oil for Germany. — The Austrian oil 
fields have experienced a rapid development dur- 
ing the last few years. In 1902, 573,440 tons 
produced. So rapid lias been the increase 
that the Austrian markets are reported to be 
overcrowded. It is estimated that a surplus of 
mill gallons of oil was at hand last 
year. Recently the German Hank at Berlin 
offered to buy up the entire surplus and u 
in beginning competition against the Standard 



retailers alone, but it is feared that this is merely 
a transitory stage in the development of its plans', 
and that before long the time will come when 
these retailers, too. will be forced out and deliver- 
ies made direct to the consumer. 

While the Pure Oil Company, of Hamburg, 
claims tn he entirely independent nl the Gi n 
American Petroleum Company, it has frequently 
been pointed out by German statisticians and in- 
dustrial writers that the former concern ad 
its prices in close harmony with those of th 
ter — a prima facie sign oi inn rather 

than competition. As a remedj for the monopo- 
listic desiLui of thr American nil magnates the 
German industrial press in all quarters is a 

irtal limption of Rus- 

sian and Roumanian oil ami the investment of 
German capital for the development of these 
promising oil fields. 



PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 



KERN 

The Sunset Telephone Company is preparing 
to put its oil field phones on direct lines and do 
away with the central office in the fields. This 
will also do away with the charge of 10 cents 
for switching and a subscriber in Bakersfield, who 
wants to talk with a subscriber in the oil fields 
will call him up just as he now calls up a sub- 
scriber in Kern. 

The arrangements for making the change are 
all complete and the work of stringing the new 
lines will begin within a few days or as soon as 
some necessary material arrives. A cable will 
be run out to the ice plant so that all the wires 
will be carried that far in an insulated cover. 

Manager Garrette says that he expects to rush 
the work and hoped to have all the oil fields 



On the Central Point lease, a rig and derrick 
mysteriously took fire and before assistance could 
arrive the outfit was burned to the ground. 
. No one had been at this rig for some time and 
the origin of the fire cannot be traced. 

At about 4 o'clock in the morning it was dis- 
covered that the bunk house at the headquarters 
of the Columbia Oil Company was on fire. The 
men sleeping in the building made a hasty exit, 
and the house was entirely consumed. 

In the case of this fire the cause is also a mys- 
.tery and it has been suggested that both might 
have been of incendiary origin. 

Oil operators are discussing the advisability of 
submitting to the new legislature the draft of a 
proposed law, making pipe lines common carriers. 
It is insisted in existing conditions that the larger 
companies, such as the Standard Oil and As- 



dence, giving the assurance of a better price for 
the product than might be expected with one big 
buyer in the field, powerful enough to choke off 
all competition. It is said that the new associa- 
tion can now depend upon a production of 415,- 
000 barrels per month. 

The Imperial Oil Company has just declared 
a monthly dividend of 20. cents per share, and 
the Thirty-Three Oil Company, one of 10 cents 
per share, both payable on January 6th. 

The Shasta Oil Company, by William P. 
Todd, attorney-in-fact, has made application for 
a mineral patent for the east half of the Campbell 
placer claim, being the east half of the southeast 
quarter of section 14-28-27. — Californian. 

With the growth and development of the oil 
industry of California and the business incidental 
thereto many good companies were formed, chief 
among which was the Associated Oil Company, 
the directors of which are bright, careful, conser- 
vative business men who have so well subserved 




Kern River District. 



subscribers happy by the first of February. There 
are now about seventy-five phones in the Kern 
River field and with the improvement in service 
and the reduced expense the number will un- 
doubtedly rapidly increase. With free mail de- 
livery and the new telephone service the oil fields 
will only lack a street railway to he a regular 
suburb of Bakersfield. 

Under the new arrangement it will be possi- 
ble to communicate with the oil fields at any 
hour of the night. 

There were two fires in the oil fields recently, 
one of them involving considerable loss to the 
Associated. 



sociated, have the smaller producers at their 
mercy, ,and the proposed new statute is intended 
to break a monopoly. 

In the event the bill that is being drafted is 
submitted, the issue is certain to provoke one of 
the heated contests of the coming legislature. 

The market for dividend-paying oil shares 
has shown more activity of late. The steady 
monthly payments by the leading companies seems 
to have attracted the attention of the investing 
public to this class of security. 

The organization of a new distributing com- 
pany, the Independent Producers' Agency of 
Kern county has also served to build up confi- 



the interests of their company that its plant has 
been steadily increased, and it has so grown with 
the advancement of the oil business in the state 
until it is now in a position to deliver oil rapidly 
from its own tanks and stations to any point 
either in California or Arizona. Its tankage 
throughout the State aggregates three million 
barrels. They are marketing more than one- 
third of the entire amount of fuel oil consumed 
in the State. 

Its holdings in Coalinga and at Los Angeles, 
in addition to its original properties in the Kern 
River and McKittrick districts, bring them well 
to the front in oil operations and as the leading 
concern in California. — Examiner. 






PACIFIC Oil PORTER 



New Use for Texas 

Petroleum 

lent and iihiujt of the 
Bruck Solidified 

■ 
tor lubricating purpose by t!i til road 

throughout the country 

it i year i 
^p>l large quanl <>il and has 

lusively. 'The first consignment was 
secured from the Bonner Oil Compan) and the 
experiment made from it proved a splendid suc- 
Thr Texas oil is superior to any other pro- 
duct known to the oil. It solidifies without de- 
stroying its lubricity, viscosity or it^ power to 
cold in a greater degree than any other oil. 
So excellent is the oil for these that the product 
has been used on railroad journals, and one ap- 
plication is (rood to last from six to eight months. 
( >n some railroads one application on locomotive 
tenders has lasted from twelve to fourteen 
months. The oil will stand a better cold test, 
is of 750 viscosity (the best known to the trade) 
and in these two important features of a lubri- 
cating oil it is 1 I i per i ent better than the oil 
found elsewhere in the United States. 

Mr. Bruck is interested in the United ( >il and 
Refining Company of Beaumont and gets all of 
his refined oils from this company. The presi- 
dent and the treasurer of the United Company 
are also among the stock holders of the Bruck 
Solidified Company. With the United Oil and 
Refining Company Mr. Bruck has taken up an- 
other proposition, which he says, he will within 
a short time revolutionize the railroad tie in- 
dustry of the United States. This is nothing 
less than a secret process whereby railroad ties, 
the average life of which is from seven to eight 
years, are to be treated with an oil process at a 
minimum of cost and whereby the utility and 
durability of the ties will be prolonged to fifteen 
or twenty years. The significance of the inven- 
tion is hard to take in and weigh for what it 
really means, at a glance. By this oil treatment 
the ties are rendered nearly indestructable. It 
is far superior to the creosote treatment, the pur- 
pose of which is to poison the wood so as to keep 
out insects and worms. Mr. Bruck claims that 
the oil treatment will not only accomplish th's, 
but that it will render the tie almost impervious 
to the corroding influences of moisture. Within 
the past few years railroad ties have advanced 
from an average of 35 and 40 cents to 65 and 70 
cents. Recently a big railroad system bought 
2,000,000 ties from Central America, paying an 
average of $1.50 per tie. It was claimed that 
these ties will last forty years. Recently the 
Lake Shore road out of Chicago as an experiment 
had put down a section of iron ties, but the road- 
bed was noisy and the iron ties were destructive 
to the rolling stock. 

Mr. Bruck prophesied that the Texas oil 
would find a new and valuable use for preserving 
railroad ties. 



The Petroleum Wells of 
Mesopotama 



In a letter from Constantinople to the Koeh- 
ntschen Zeitung, information of the conclusion of 
an agreement between the representatives of the 
Sultan and Mr. Zander, the general director of 
the Anatoil railway, concerning the exploitation 
of the Mesopotamian petroleum wells is explained 
as follows: 

It deals with the agreement concerning the 
wells which are situated in the districts Mossul 
and Bagdad. This territory belongs to the broad 
strip between the Caucasus, the Arabian Desert, 
the Persian Gulf and the Hindoo province where 
earth oil appears in abundance. Burning wells 
and lakes have been known since the year one 
thousand and since the year one thousand asphalt 
was used as fuel west of the Euphrates. A share 
of this wealth has not circulated to a greater ex- 



WESTERN COOPERAGE CO. 

MAM PACTURI l<>- ill 

STAVES and HEADING 

For Both Tl£hl and Slack \V,.rk. 
OUR SPECIALTIES ARE 

WfiiteSpruceSaresandHeading Fir Tight Barrel States and 

all read, to set up lor Fish. Heading lor Oil, Lard, Pork, 

Pickles or lard packages ol BeB( f (c £ tc 

any size. " <>00 

Fir Slack Barrel Staves and Heading for Asphalt, Lime 
Cement and Bottle Barrels. 

Prompt and Courteous Jtttentlon to nil Inquiries. 

MILLS at Aberdeen, Wash, and Houlton, Ore. 



\I ING \ \l \r COMPI 
Th) plete map 

ever published has jus by the 

famou <■ map-ma! Hill, 

Bakersfield, Cal. Each pipe line Is carefully 
surveyed m\A each well carefully located. All 
land holdings have hern brought strictly up to 
date and the map is a line specimen of the map- 
makers' art. If you are interested in the Coal- 
inga field you should not be without one. Price 
for large blue-prints. $1.50 each. Order direct 
from the makers or from the PACIFIC Oil RE- 
PORTER, .ilS Pine street, San Francisco. 



E 



Lacy Manufacturing Company 



Manufacturers of 



Steel Water Pipe 
General Sheet 
Iron Works 
Oil Well Casing 
Oil Stills 

OIL STORAGE AND WAGON TANKS 

Works: Cor. New Main and Date streets. P. O. Box 231, Station C. 

Baker Block Telephone Main 196 

Office, 334 North Main Street, Los Angeles, Cal. 

BATES' 

PATENT CASING TONGS 





1416-1426 19th St.. Bakersfield. Cal 



Fills a long-felt want. No more need of 
pole and rope for screwing up casing. Bates 
Tongs can be applied to the casing anywhere 
in driving or pulliog without danger of injury 
or parting casing. 

Set No. 1, with any two size jaws from q$^ 
to 13^ inches. 

Set No. 2, with any two size jaws fro-n 4 to 
q5/£ inches. 




X~ — OF-ANy-U^PACJ-TY^ 

^ffi^ErfmYlBOILER^WrJR 

OHIO. 



ky/if»Kwgi 



10 



PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 



A BIG DEAL 



The Bullfrog Extension Mining Company has closed a big deal with local people for all 
of its treasury stock which insures the financing of the company. One party took 350,000 shares. 
We have sold nearly all of our allotment of 50,000 shares. It will be gone in a short time. 
Wire your orders if you want stock at 20 cents It will be quoted on the Exchange in a very 
short time at a very much higher price. A strike of $1000 ore has been made on a six-foot 
ledge on the Bullfrog Mine, 300 feet from the shaft being sunk on the Bullfrog Extension. 
Bullfrog and Extension shares will make you large and quick returns. Wire for particulars. 
Address all orders to 

Debenture Surety Company 

Rialto Building, A lO 



Use the Wires. It Pays. 



San Francisco, Cal. 



BUY A BARLOW & HILL MAP 



OF THE OIL FIELDS 

Large Blue Prints, 

Large Blue Prints on Linen, 
Book of Indexed Maps, 



$1.50 

3.00 

.50 



SPECIAL MAPS MADE TO ORDER 

Prices on Application 

&f>e Pacific Oil Reporter 

SAN FRANCISCO 



318 PINE STREET 



DIRECTORS. 

M. Grossmayer. 
S. Fleisher. 
J. B. Bonetti. 
T. R. Finley. 
S. A. Johnson. 
C. F. Bramming. 
James Smith. 



OFFICERS. 

M. Grossmayer, Pres. 
S. Fleisher, Vice Pres. 
J. B. Bonetti, Treas. 
T. R. Finley, Sec'y* 
S. A. Johnson, Gen. Mgr. 



Barca Oil Company 



CAPITALIZATION, $500,000; PAR VALUE STOCK, $1.00 PER SHARE. 



The property of this Company consists of 250 acres of land, situated one-half mile north of 
the famous Purissima well of the Union Oil Company, which has been flowing 500 barrels of oil 
dady for the past year, and it is directly in line between that well and the same company's 
famous 12,000-barrel gusher on the Hartnell Tract. 

We are offering enough stock in our Company at 25 cents per share to drill our first well, 
and at this price the stock is the best and safest investment so far offered in the Santa Maria Dis- 
trict, and a sure money-maker for those who invest. 

Our well No. 1 is now drilling and will be pushed to completion as rapidly as possible. 

For further information address 



BARCA OIL COMPANY, 



SANTA MARIA, CAL. 



tent, on the one hand on account of the insecurity 
of the straits, on the other hand on account of 
the small demand in the immediate vicinity of the 
wells. The channels of earth oil have formed 
viscous pools, in which man and beast have sunk. 
No small lakes here and there on the surface of 
the ground or flowing brooks which discharge in- 
to water courses have dislodged them. The gov- 
ernment of the wells belonging to the represent- 
atives of the Sultan is now leased to the natives, 
who work only for the daily requirements and 
restrict themselves to digging in the harder as- 
phalt masses of the well of about 4 meters in 
depth and 10 meters in diameter in order to be 
able to allow the continually self-recovering 
masses to clear and to be more easily brought to 
the surface. Often sulphur springs are found in 
the vicinity, which are originally used as mineral 
waters. In El Kijata, situated between Mossul 
and Bagdad on the Tigris, the natives mix a sul- 
phur containing earth of bitter taste for a drink 
to which they ascribe the power of healing. The 
representative to-day obtains from all the wells 
a revenue of only 20,000 marks per year, although 
the productiveness may be compared in many 
points with that of the wells in Baku. If the 
yield of this wealth of the soil were better devel- 
oped then the Kurdish operators would be more 
strenuous in order to increase their toil, notwith- 
standing tire accentuation of their loyalty to the 
government. 

in the district Mossul there are the follow- 
ing points which come into consideration : — 
Sachu, three days' journey from Mossul, easy of 
approach, rich wells. Mimrud, to be reached 
from Mcs5ul in five hours by boat on the Tigris, 
dark-colored earth oil, but drillings may pro- 
duce better oil. Gurgur on the great highway 
Mossuf-Bag'dad, rich wells, in the possession of 
a Kurdish family from Kerkuki here gases es- 
cape from the fissured earth to a place where 
they are inflamed. Tushurmalty, situated to the 
south on the same highway, rich asphalt strata 
from 4 to 5 meters thick. Kifri or Salahieh, south 
of Tushurmalty, less productive, strong strata of 
pure asphale which is also shipped to Bagdad. 
Gill, a Kurdish hilly country, numberless wells 
of good petroleum, production often hindered by 
the Kurds. Karadagh, Kurdish hilly country 
north of Gill, less productive but also less can- 
vassed and less frequented. El Kijata, upon the 
right hank of the Tigris, 80 kilometers south of 
Mosul, petroleum lake 300 meters in diameter, 
great asphalt beds. In Bagdad the district Men- 
deli on the Persian border is to be mentioned. 
Here there are "spouting" wells which, in Sau- 
len, eject oil several meters beyond the surface 
of the ground, possibility, of large production. 
Furthermore, there is Nephata on the Euphrates, 
five hours from Hit, several springs always with ' 
the same high class of earth oil, as much as one 
may wish to procure. Finally the bitumen wells 
of Hit belong here in which, under high pressure, 
quantities of bitumen are forced from the interior 
of the earth. One may indeed assume that an 
intelligent and enterprising administration of' 
these stores of the earth will bring profit to the 
government. It may certainly be supposed that 
the exemption from taxes of the possessions of 
the Sultan is not extended to the produce of these 
wells. 

Most of the territory rich in petroleum is situ- 
ated apart from that stretch intended for the fu- 
ture Bagdad railway, but it is, nevertheless, in 
an attainable neighborhood. No doubt that the 
road and a regular production of the wells will 
serve one another. A methodical management of 
the naphtha industry is possible only under the 
supposition that the unruliness of the Kurdish 
vagabonds is restrained. — Naphta. 









thr nnphth.ilrnr from ill 

■ 
■ 

to rar 

an interim this oil 

tor urashin 

naphthalrne stoppage hav- 
ing practicall} ceased. Pre was not un- 
departmenl ■ • from 
this re- 
lict tu the gas management, it is believed that 
the profits of the undertaking will be in 

least $25,000 per annum. The undertak- 
ing, by the way, is a municipal affair. Its 
profit- during the pasl six months exceeding 
>-M' '.000. 

[MPROVED LABORATORY 

APPLIANCES SECURE 

GOLD MEDAL. 



The World's Fair judges have 
awarded the F. \V. Braun Company 
Los Angeles gold medals covering 
practicallj their entire line of im- 
proved apparatus and appliances for 
assayers, metallurgists and chemists. 

'I heir exhibit was arranged in 
three groups, and the highest award, a 
gold medal, was secured for each 
group. Among the medal winners 
were the following: Gary Hydro- 
carbon burner. Marvel Crude Oil 
Burner, Braun Gas Burner, Cary 
Furnaces, Braun Cupel Machine, a 
complete line of ore crushing and pul- 
verizing machines, Braun Ore Sam- 
pler. 

The recognition accorded by the 
fair judges .has also been freely given 
by the scientific and commercial world, 
as Braun's Labor Saving Laboratory 
Appliances are in use in the principal 
educational, mining and commercial 
laboratories in all parts of the world. 
Government laboratories in the 
United States and foreign countries 
have been particularly prompt to rec- 
ognize the merits of these specialties. 

Complete catalogue may be had by 
writing to F. W. Braun Company, 

Foreign Petroleum Mar- 
Rets Improving 



Export petroleum business requires a stimu- 
lant, and the Standard Oil Co. has just lowered 
the price for that purpose. The export trade in 
refined oils for the eleven months of 190+ has 
been highly satisfactory and the valuation of the 
oil shipped abroad exceeds that of any eleven 
months of am preceding year. But the Novem- 
ber exports fell short of the October record, both 
in amount and value. The loss in amount was 
over 2,0011,1)011 gallons, and in value about $ 
000; but the November export was much greater 
than that of November of last year. 

Prices of refined petroleum have shown a gen- 



Flow ol Natural Gas 
Increased by . . . 

Cooper's Gas Lift 

Also flow of water 
or oil increased and 
gas saved 

A. S. COOPER, C. E., 



219 Crocker Building 
San Francisco, Cal. 



WE SELL 




BARLOW & HILL 



UP-TO- 
DATE . 



MAPS 



WHICH ARK TUB ONI Y 

RELIABLE MAP PUBLISHED 



Large Blue Prints $1.50 

Book containing Kmall Indexed Mapa 

of nil the California Flclda, each SO 

Per Dozen 5.00 

PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 

318 PINE STREET 

Kan Francisco 



..OIL TANKS.. 

Oil Stills, Car Tanks, Riveted Pipe, Storage Tanks of 
every capacity and every descrJption. Write for 'Estimates 

WM. GRAVER TANK WORKS 



77 Jackson Boulevard 



CHICAGO, ILL. 



We Promote, Finance and Incorporate 

Let us show you the advantages of incorporating your business or enterprise. 
If you need money to enlarge your business, permit us to secure it for yoii, by selling 
stock through our Eastern correspondents. 

CONSOLIDATED AUDITING COMPANY 

' 307 to 310 Mills Building, San Francisco. 

Telephone Bush 849. 



WRITE US TO-DAY ! 
» If you want to invest your money in a sound business proposition where you are sure 

to receive ten dollars for every one dollar invested 

BUY BUFFALO-CALIFORNIA OIL STOCK. 
This company is incorporated under a special act of Congress providing for the incor- 
poration of companies in the District of Columbia, making our stock absolutely non-assessable 
We hold some of the most valuable oil property in the well known 

HALFMOON BAY DISTRICT, 
San Mateo County, California, 
Now possessing many fine oil wells producing 52° to 55° gravity oil. But we cannot tell it all 
here. Write us for full particulars. 

Correspondence with reliable brokers and agents solicited. 

BUFFALO-CALIFORNIA OIL CO., 
Fletcher Block, 
Livermore, California. 

C. V. Hall Iron Works 

Los Angeles Office, 222 Wilcox Buildng, LOS "NGELES, CAL. 

All kinds of Oil Well Tools. 
Very Best Materials 

Fishing Tools and Heavy Forging and 
Machine Work 

ASK YOUR SUPPLY HOUSE FOR 

C. V. H. TOOLS 

The C. V. H. Chain Tongs can be had through 
any dealer in oil well supplies. 

Address 

CHARLES VICTOR HALL 

222 Wilcox Building, Los Angeles, California 




12 



PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 



ADOLPH L. STONE 

Crude Oil and Asphalt BroKer 

Contracts for Crude Oil in the Santa Maria, Kern River and Coalinga Districts 
California Asphalt Shipments arranged for all parts of the world 

All grades Asphalt for Street Paving, Roofing, Varnish Manufacturers, Etc. Samples on application 

Office, 137 Montgomery Street ... C-_ 1<Vi»i>C»i«5CT» Cal 

Mail Address, P. O. Box 2520 ... »» an * railClSCO, V^ai. 



We manufacture the best 
lubricating oils for oil 
drillers 

KING KEYSTONE OIL, CO., 
204 Front St., San Francisco. 



FOR SALE. 



1000 shares Pinal Oil stock at $3.60 per share. 

3000 shares Brookshire Oil stock at $1.00 per 
share. 

W. E. BARNARD, 
476 Tenth Street, Oakland, California 



HE 

KROHN 
WIRE ROPE SOCKET 

THE ONLY SOCKET USING A BALL CLUTCH 



LASTING QUALITIES UNEQUALLED 



PATENT 



CLUTCH 




DEVICE 



For Sale by ALL 

OIL WELL SUPPLY HOUSES 



1 



LLEWELLYN IRON WORKS 

SOLE MANUFACTURERS 

LOS ANGELES, CAL. 



Write for Circular 





eral decline during the year. In January the 
market was quoted at 9.10 cents per gallon for 
74 deg. Abel test ; was cut 25 points in February, 
making the price 8.85 cents for oil in barrels and 
5.95 cents for oil in bulk. Prices were again 
reduced in March and a cut of 35 points followed 
in April. A drop of 20 points in July, made the 
quotation at the close of the month 7.70 cents per 
gallon for oil in barrels and 4.80 cents for oil 
jn bulk. These continued the ruling figures for 
August until the very last day of the month, 
when the price was advanced to 7.85 cents per 
gallon. Another advance of 1 Opoints was re- 
corded on September 23, which made refined in 
barrels 7.95 and in bulk 5.05 cents a gallon. 
These figures constituted the ruling quotation 
for the past two months. For November a year 
ago, the average price was 9.37 cents per gallon. 
The new price, announced December 15, is 7.80 
cents, a drop of 15 points from the October-No- 
vember figure. Immediately after the announce- 
ment of this price concession export orders showed 
an increase. 

For the eleven months ending with November 
30, 1904, our total exports of petroleum and its 
products amounted to 912,992,010 gallons and 
valued at $72,560,510, as compared with 822,- 
644,950 gallons, valued at $62,890,873, for the 
same period ending with November 30, 1903. 
This represented an increase of 90,347,060 gallons 
in amount and of $9,669,637 in value. Of the 
1904 exports 694,942,151 gallons were illumin- 
ating oil, compared with 607,297,718 gallons in 
the corresponding eleven months of 1903. 



ASSESSMENT NOTICE. 

Arline Oil Company, a corporation. Principal 
place of business, San Francisco. Location 
of property, Fresno County, California. 

Notice is Hereby Given that at a meeting of 
the Directors held on the 24th day of December, 
1904, assessment No. 2 of one cent per share 
was levied upon the capital stock of the corpo- 
ration, payable on or before the 3rd day of 
February, 1905, to J. W. Pauson, Secretary, at 
the office of the Company, at Room 500 Parrott 
Building, San Francisco. Any stock upon which 
this assessment shall remain unpaid on said 3rd 
day of February, 1905, will be delinquent and 
advertised for sale at public auction, and, unless 
payment is made before, will be sold on the 27th 
day of February, 1905, to pay the delinquent 
assessment, together with costs of advertising and 
expenses of the sale. J. W. Pauson, 

Secretary. 
Room 500 Parrott Building, S. F., Cal. 



AT A BARGAIN. 
Standard Drilling Rig with full equipment of 
small tools. Boiler and engine in first-class con- 
dition. Address Exchange No. 21, care this 
journal. 




ALL 
UP 
OIL WELL TO 

SUPPLIES DATE 

R. H. HERRON CO. 




FISHING TOOLS 
FOR RENT 

309 MISSION STREET 

SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 



PACIFK MR 






CALIF( 



CHAN 



iitur- 
unuc in the formal 9 
held for thr work ending Wednesday, Jan. 4: 

: — 

18,242 shares at 

shares at. 






I 



57 



.65 



Caribou — 

s at 7 . 00 

Forty — 

4.00 I shares at 45 

hares at 47 

1,000 shares at 50 

Four — 

1,000 shares at 55 

Independence — 

1,000 shares at 30 

Monte CristO — 

100 shares at 77' U 

50 shares at 80 



Occidental — 

300 shares at . 

Oil City Petroleum- 
2,000 shares at. . 



.07 



.68 



Sovereign — 

200 shares at 30 

800 shares at 31 

Sterling — 

150 shares at 2.00 



Asked. 
.80 

.27 

.19 

10.00 



.85 



.50 

.55 

200.00 

.45 



.30 

12.50 

.20 



Imperial 16.50 

Independence 29 .30 

Kern 5.50 

Kern (New) 

Kern River 

Linda Vista 12 

McKittrick 10 

Monarch of Arizona 

Monte Cristo 75 

Occidental of W. Va 

Oil City Petroleum 

Pittsburg 06 

Reed Crude 2.00 

Sovereign 

Sterling 1-50 

Superior 03 

Thirty-Three 6.25 

Toltec 25 

Twenty-Eight 12.0n 

Union ° 7 



.30 
.80 
.08 
.68 
.07 



.32 
2.00 

8.25 

14.00 



FRESNO COUNTY ABSTRACT COMPANY 

Incorporated Under the Laws of California January 21, 1901. 

Capital Stock $100,000.00 

FULLY PAID UP 

SEARCHERS OF RE CORDS AND CONVEYANCE 

Abstracts of Title Carefully Compiled at Reasonable Rates. 



Following are the latest quotations for stocks 
of oil companies listed on the California S.tock 
and Oil Exchange: 

Bid. 

Alma 

Apollo 35 

Ass. Oil Co. Stk. Tr. Cer. .26 

California-Standard 18 

Caribou 7.00 

Centi al Point Con 70 

Chicago Crude 23 

Claremont ' 

Coalinga & Pacific 75 

Esperanza 1 .00 

Forty 40 

Four 54 

Kanford 185.00 

Home 42 



NO. 1115 K ST., 



FRESNO, CAL 



SMITH, EMERY ®, CO, 

izzz- Chemical Engineers— 

ANALYSES 




PF.TROLEUM — Calorific Value, 
Fractional Distillation, Refining, Vis= 
coslty, Freezing,Candle Power, Burn- 
ing, Tests, Etc. Boiler Feed & Drink- 
ing Water. Umpire Work on Oil Contracts. 

83-85 New Montgomery Street 

SAN FRANCISCO 





CLOT & CRIST MACHINE CO. 

Designers and Builders of Special and Labor=Saving Machinery 

Estimates Furnished on Power and Pumping Plants Complete 

Special Attention Paid to the Repairing of Steam Pumps and Other Machinery 

manufacturers of THE BEST PUMP ON EARTH 

For Water Works and Mining Purposes 
For Oil Pipe Lines and Oil Burning Plants 
Artesian Deep Well and Sinking Pumps 

Electric Driven Pumps of Every Kind 
AGENTS FOR 

3= Horse Power Stickney Gasoline Engine 

Telephone John 596 

137=139 Beale Street, San Francisco 



R. P. WADDELL 

GENERAL AGENT FOR 

X-Ray and Dandy Windmills 

PUMPS, PIPING, TANKS, FRAMES, 

GALVANIZED STEEL AND WOOD TOWERS 

Aermotor Mills and Repairs 

ESTIMATES ON IRRIGATING OUTFITS 

35 Beale St., San Francisco 

Branch Office: 353 llth St.. Oakland, Cal. 



H. B. GUTHREY 

Oil Well Contractor 

Specifications furnished on wells of any depth 

;=^^=z= in any country n^^===: 

WATER SHUT OFF IN OIL WELLS 

Many valuable oil properties in this state saved by our process 
which is sure and permanent 

Our references are our past customers 

H. B. GUTHRBY, 

COALINGA, CAL. 




14 



PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 



ALASKA MOSQUITO HEAD NET 

A Perfect Protection Against Insect Pests 




Adopted by ih'e United States 
Government as the Standard for 
use in the army. 

Over 150,000 of these ntts sent 
to the Philippine?, 

Invented for and in general use 
in mosquito infested Alaska. 

Folds up compactly nnd goes 
easily into the pocket. 

Made of specially prepared gal. 
vanized steel wire and the finest 
and strongest netiing. 

Invaluable for hunter?, campers 
and travelers. 

Can be worn day or night with- 
out inconvenience. 



>*^V^N^A^^*^A«*^V^^AAAA* 



Made in Two Varieties. 

No. 1. Made of finest netting, sure protection against mosquitos. 50 cents, 
No. 2. Made of very fine, but strong, imported lace, for midges and black 
flies, |i.oo. 

If your dealer does not handle them, write direct 
to the manufacturer and we will mail on receipt of 
price. 

ALASKA MOSQUITO BEAD NET CO. 



318 PINB STREET 



SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 



A Business 
Proposition 

We all seek the most comforts 
this life at the minimum expenditure 
of labor or cash. If you are going 
East you will find the 

Union Pacific 



ahead of all others on the above 
basis. At the same time you reach 
your destination quicker. 
Drop me a postal and I will call and 
explain everything. 

S. P. BOOTH, 

General Agent U. P. R. R. Co. 
No. 1 Montgomery Street, San Francisco. 



^^ 7IC>n E£T T\/¥^ D^ Think not of what they pay, but of what 
W 1©C DU I Dlv5^ they get for what th ey pay. 

Strictly Reliable Goods in all Lines 

OIL WELL 



Machinery 



AND 



SUPPLIES 



BOILERS 
ENGINES 

Steam Pumps 




BOYAIRD & SEYFANG DRILLING ENGINE 



IF YOU WANT 




B 



BOSTON CASING 

We have it in all sizes 



LET US SHOW YOU 
HOW WE TREAT 
OUR CUSTOMERS 



MACHINE SHOP 

Tools and Equipments 



Pacific Coast Manufacturing Co. Los Angeles, Cal. 



■ Ml I ill 



PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 



Vol. 6. No. 11 



San Francisco, Cal., Saturday, Jan. 14, 1905 



Price IO Cents 



PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 

Published 

The Oil Authority of the 
Endorsed by California Petroleum Miners' Ass'n. 



Maria K. Wins. Proprietor. 

man. Editor and Ma 



OFFICE A\D EDITORIAL ROOMS 

MS Pine Street - - San Francisco, California 
Telephone, Hush 176. 

TERMS. 

One Year $2.50 

Six Months 1 .30 

Three Months 1.00 

Single Copies 10 

STRICTIA IN ADVANCE. 

Money should he sent by Postal Order, Draft 
or Registered Letter, addressed to Pacific Oil 
Reporter. 318 Pine Street, San Francisco, rooms 
31-32-33. Communications must be accompanied 
by writer's name and address, not necessarily for 
publication, but as a guarantee of good faith. 

Entered in the Postoffice at San Francisco, Cal- 
ifornia, as second class matter. 

Latest Quotations 






Following are the latest quotations for Califor- 
nia crude oil at the wells as offered by the Pa- 
cific Coast Oil Company : 

COALINCA. 

Price 
Gravity at 60 deg. temperature. per barrel. 

Oil of 22 deg., up to, but not including 24. .$0.20 
Oil of 24 deg., up to, but not including 25 . . .30 
Oil of 25 deg., up to, but not including 26. . .35 
Oil of 26 deg., up to, but not including 27. . .40 
Oil of 27 deg., up to, but not including 28. . .45 
Oil of 28 deg., up to, but not including 29. . .50 
Oil of 29 deg., up to, but not including 30. . .55 
The Associated Oil Company is offering 17 1 , ■■•> 
cents for fuel oil. 

SANTA MARIA. 

Gravity at 60 deg. Price per barrel 

Temperature. at Port Harford. 

24 deg. up to but not including 25 $ .25 

25 deg. up to but not including 26 30 

26 deg. up to but not including 27 35 

27 deg. or better 40 

KERN RIVER. 

All oil of 14 deg. gravity or better, except that 
contracted by the Pacific Coast Oil Co., is being 
taken by the Associated Oil Company at 18 cents 
per barrel under a year's contract with the Inde- 
pendent Agency. 

EASTERN QUOTATIONS. 

Pennsylvania $1 .30 

Tiona 1-65 

Corning ' • ' ' 

Newcastle ,'m 

North Lima , 

South Lima ^ b 

Indiana • ™ 

Somerset ^ 

Ragland 58 

Petrolea (Ont.) ' - 4 > 

KANSAS-INDIAN TERRITORY. 

( )il of 32 degrees gravity $° -jj7 

Oil of 31 1 ', degrees gravity °-_- 

Oil of 31 degrees gravity " 

Oil of 30Va degrees gravity - 

Oil of 30 degrees gravity b ' 

Oil of 20i :, degrees gravity °2 

Oil of 29 degrees gravity j> 

I )il ,0 28 1 •• degrees gravity j>- 

Oil of 28 degrees gravif • +/ 



^T^™ inta County, \\ il field 

(/Tp>| I'.i- had .irks in the pasl 

^ W.fJ bin now seems to 

j" ahead in it; 

coining to (he trout. One thing that 
should be taken into consideration 
that a comparativi \\ 

pective field has been itions 

und in I inta Ci untj ■ ve\ an area of more 
than si\ hundred squa at the 

I tah State line on the s luth is an eas'lj tra 
anticlii 

neai Fontinell, on the north. It i> on this anti- 
cline near Spring Vallej that all the prodi 
wells in the count] I. * 

part of th line has been di illed 

Many parallel anticlines remain virgin soil. 

While it is tn ' I thus far drilled 

ha . e fail< d to sho ive capacity 

a sufficient numbei of them would doul 
prove profitable, and as developm n ci itinues 
richer strike- may. and doubtless will, be made. 
All wells thus far drilled in the field have been 
comparatively shallow; some of those pronounced 
failures having been no deeper than 1200 feet. 
The deepest well in the field is 2000 feet and this 
is conceded to have been drilled in a "wash" or 
sedimentary formation. There is no reason to 
suppose that the three or four light-oil sands, 
row known to exist, are all there is, and a deep 
v 1 11 properly located might reveal a deep and pro- 
ductive oil stratum. We hope the new company 
that has taken over the Atlantic and Pacific 
prcperty will proceed with development work 
as sson as the weather permits, and that it will 
make an attempt to show the worth or worth- 
lessness of the field. 



The Daily Californian has got the "sore head" 
and all the good things it has ever said about 
the Independent Oil Producers' Agency are be- 
ing retracted. All because it got "scooped" on 
the news of the contract with the Associated. 
The Echo printed the news twenty-four hours 
ahead and even our own sheet got there with 
both feet before it was too late. No wonder 
at the anger. Who wouldn't get vexed at being 
"scocped?" So the Californian says hard things 
about the Echo. It also says the Pacific Oil 
Reporter is friendly to the Standard. That 
was the meanest thing it could say. We might 
say the Californian is friendly to the "small fry" 
it so strongly upholds; in fact it can be stated 
with good reasons. There are a few of these 
"scabs" (the ones we mentioned a few weeks ago) 
that doubtless need an official organ, and indi- 
cations point to the Californian. There is no 
kick among the members of the Independent 
Agency at the price of 18 cents per barrel for 
all the oil they can produce for a year. At the 
meeting held in Bakersfield this contract was 
ratified by every company in the corporation 
and considerable enthusiasm was shown. If 
there is any kick coming it is from the "scabs," 
an< j ii is only natural that their opinions should 
be voiced through their official organ. No one 
,, , u y like to see the price of oil come up to 
50 cents .1 I dollar a barrel any better than the 

Pacific Oil Reporter., and we stand ready to 
enter any fair fight against the Standard 
dated, or any other mono. u'n this end. 



oil price, in the Santa \l iria 

district merciless ding to the latesl 

cular issued In tin company the price paid at 

•d in the future w ill be iust one-half 

1! disadvan- 

ni the 

1 1 one 

half that fi paid for the lowest grade 

ot that class. I In highest quotation now made 

hj tin for oil at Port Harford is 40 

After paying a freight charge 

cents i»r barrel from the field and taking 

can 2 per cent foi asphaltum and several 

' ions spei diid In the P. C, I >- 1 ircular it 
the produce! a littl 1 ' le -com- 

il on for his generositj in producing oil that 
the Standard Oil Company may thrive. If the 
Companj has any idea that it is going to bluff 
the Santa Maria field into accepting anything 
short of a reasonable price for their product it 
will find itself greatly mistaken. The companies 
11 one and all officered by men who are in a 
n to shut down their wells until a price 
is offered for the oil that shall be profitable for 
them to produce and they one and all are em- 
phatic in their declaration that they will cap 
their wells and keep them capped until the lakes 
of the infernal regions shall have become solidi- 
fied !'\ a hard freeze and that even then they 
will stand around on the congealed H. 2 O. and 
wait for the Standard to warm up to the situa- 
tii n and pay what the oil is worth. It is quite 
likely that the Pacific Oil and Transportation 
Company will help out the situation to a consid- 
erable degree, but it is, of course, restricted by 
competition and a limited market. 



We are receiving so many congratulations on 
ilr appearance of our New- Year's Special that 
we are getting to feel quite "puffed up." It is 
a source of much gratification to know one's ef- 
forts are appreciated. There is no reason why 
the Pacific On. Reporter should not receive 
the hearty endorsement of every oil man in Cali- 
fornia and if each one would start the new 
by investing in a year's subscription it might help 
us to add to the efficiency- of the publication. 
(Oh ! yes, we get a kick occasionally, but we don't 
find the names of the authors on our subscrip- 
tion hook. They are the kind that borrow the 
journal from their next-door neighbor. If you 
want good letters from the oil fields and good 
articles pertaining to the industry give us suf- 
ficient support so we can pay our correspond- 
ents and buy an occasional beefsteak for the office 
cat. We can make the Pacific Oil Reporter 
just as good as the oil men of California are 
willing to pay for, but we can't do it all on 
hot air. 



We were verj sorry to disappoint our readers 
last week in the non-appearance of Prof. Cooper's 
article on '"Natural Gas in California." Some 
of these articles require a great deal of time in 
their preparation and it is impossible to 
them always appear in consecutive numbers ot 
journal. Prof. Cooper has been in the field 
ithering data for forth 
ing articles, which will be, as all his articles 
and authentic. It will tak 
,1 of the current year to complel 



PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 



Superheated Steam Distil- 
lation for tKe Analysis 
of Special Lubricat- 
ing Oils 



(From the French of Emile Lecocq in Le Jour- 
nal de Petrole.) 



The best method of determining the value of 
a lubricating oil is the practical test of this oil 
on the machine for which lubrication is needed. 
If the inquiry is raised, which are the best lubri- 
cants for different machines or the different or- 
gans of the same machine, it is necessary, by a 
series of tests methodically conducted, to take ac- 
count mechanically of the manner in which these 
lubricants behave with reference to the diminu- 
tion of friction and to the consumption of the oil 
or fat. 

These points being established, it is necessary 
to seek, by means of chemical analysis, the series 
of characteristics serving for fixing tbe composi- 
tion of the lubricants which have been practically 
tested for determined conditions, for it is import- 
ant that the seller should know what products 
he may offer, and that the buyer should be sure 
of those which he is to accept, without possible 
doubt in price-currents or a bill of sale. There 
will be much less security if the buyer is obliged 
to apply tests to machinery for, the purpose of de- 
ciding on the acceptance or refusal of lubricants, 
than if a well-trained chemist should determine 
the composition according to approved analytical 
processes. 

The chemical analysis of lubricants would con- 
sist in the determination of the degree of purity 
of the fats, properly so called, if industry had not 
for a long time utilized for the lubrication of 
machinery the complex mixtures of hydrocarbides 
constituting the residue of the distillation of pe- 
troleum. The great majority of lubricants con- 
sist to-day of mineral oils ; in many cases the re- 
sults of their employment are superior to those 
of their predecessors, the ordinary fats, while the 
price of the latter is kept at double or triple the 
rates of the former; it will, therefore, be mineral 
oils that are to be considered, if one wishes to 
buy lubricants both suitable and inexpensive. 

Suppose that detailed tests on machines, after 
eliminating a numerous series of valueless pro- 
ducts, have determined the choice of certain good 
types of lubricants, what then will be the role 
of the chemist charged with verifying their com- 
position? In the same way as, under ordinary 
circumstances, the analysis of fats, properly so- 
called, does not reveal the immediate analysis of 
mineral lubricating oils does not seek to sepa- 
rate them, and to determine the numerous hy- 
drocarbides forming their composition. Not that, 
in the present state of our knowledge, the system 
could not be realized for the oils in question, 
but an analysis would end in classifying and de- 
termining in a single sample some twenty hydro- 
carbides, making use of the standard processes of 
halogenation, alcoholization and perhaps those of 
reduction and oxidation. Such an analysis would 
involve an expense of time which would render 
a rapid and efficacious verification impossible. 

The determination of a certain number of con- 
stants will often enable the chemist to identify 
the ordinary fats; these have, over mineral oils, 
the advantage of nearly a fixed composition. The 
list of certain physical and mechanical properties, 
capable of being made in a precise way and in 



a short time, may, up to a certain point, enlighten 
us on the identity of mineral oils. The estima- 
tion of density, of viscosity, of resistance to move- 
ment, of the coefficient of lubrication, may be in- 
cluded among the properties to which I have re- 
ferred. I would be able to add the investigation 
of the flashing point, if the studies of Kunckler 
and my own had not demonstrated its complete 
uselessness as an element of appreciation of lu- 
bricating oils from different points of view; but 
it must not be forgotten that mineral oils are 
essentially variable in their composition, -and 
it may be that an oil, having the same density, 
the same viscosity and the same coefficient of re- 
sistance to friction as another may, however, 
have a different composition, and manifest the 
difference in its results on machinery. 

It seems to me that without calling for a classi- 
fication and a determination of all the hydrocar- 
bides of these oils, in order to identify them 
surely, we might succeed in fortifying the opin- 
ion of the chemist who is charged with analyzing 
them, by putting at his disposal a greater number 
of guiding points than those of which he now 
makes use. 

Without claiming absolute certainly in the 
investigation of the identity of a mineral oil, 
fractional distillation constitutes a valuable 
method for the industrial chemist. It has been 
especially applied to gasoline and to lamp petro- 
leums, both in their industrial preparation and in 
the analysis of their products. The distillation of 
these substances, being effected between 30 deg. 
and 300 deg. C. at ordinary pressure may be 
conducted with naked fire by well-established ar- 
rangements, if results are desired which can be 
compared with each other. 

Numerous analyses made in this way have con- 
tributed to secure a classification of lamp petro- 
leum and of the benzines of petroleums, which 
is now generally accepted in industry and com- 
merce. 

I have applied to the analysis of lubricating 
mineral oils the fractional distillation, which has 
hitherto been limited to employment in the analy- 
sis of the lighter products. Still, proceeding from 
the last portions of lamp petroleums, distilling at 
about 300 deg. C. the distillation cannot be con- 
tinued with naked fire at the same pressure with- 
out decomposing the contents of the retort; it 
has been necessary to make use of a process which 
allows of completely distilling any mineral oil. 

The method of anah'sis which I have the honor 
to propose for the examination of lubricating oils, 
has been long employed in certain researches of 
organic chemistry. Rasinski has applied it to the 
study of petroleum hydrocarbides from a scien- 
tific viewpoint, without being, as it appears, quite 
satisfied with the results obtained. The distilla- 
tion in superheated steam may be utilized in the 
analysis of any mineral oil, and even of a mixture 
of mineral oil and resin or coal tar oils, but cer- 
tain circumstances have led me to confine myself 
at present to data relative to C3dinder oils, for 
which I ha\ e been able to bring together a larger 
number of analyses than for other kinds of lu- 
bricating oils. The apparatus used in the analy- 
sis consists of a reservoir of enameled sheet iron, 
3 | 2 liters in capacity, with a copper cover, tight- 
ly fitted; a copper tube, 10 millimeters in inside 
diameter, turned in spiral form six times on a 
diameter of 35 millimeters ; a Jena glass receiver 
of 1 liter, with rounded bottom furnished with 
cork stopped and a thermometer ranging from 
zero to 260 deg. C. and a Liebig condenser 80 
centimeters in length. 

After filling two-thirds of the reservoir with 
water, a subjacent gas burner is lighted, so as 



to give a strong heat, 25-30 grams of oil are in- 
troduced into the glass receiver; then the ther- 
mometer is so adjusted that the mercury bulb is 

3 or 4 centimeters below the lower part of the 
stopper, which penetrates about 2 centimeters into 
the neck of the receiver. The copper tube coming 
from the steam reservoir passes through the stop- 
per and ends in the oil at the bottom of the re- 
ceiver. A glass tube of 8 or 9 millimeters in 
diameter commences at the level of the ther- 
mometric receiver, passes through the stopper, 
bends at an acute angle 12 or 13 centimeters 
above and penetrates the condenser. 

The distillation in steam requires as much or 
even more than is the case with fractional distil- 
lation, strict observation of the conditions of the 
test, which is fixed once for all, in order to be 
able to obtain comparative results. 

This is the modus operandi adopted for the 
examination of these oils. Before the appear- 
ance of the steam in the receiver a single burner 
under it and a triple burner for heating the cop- 
per tube have been lighted, but allowing for each 
of them only a very small flame ; the burner heat- 
ing the receiver will need only a flame of about 

4 c. m., of which the point ought not to reach 
the wire cloth supporting it. On the entrance of 
the steam in the receiver, the intensity of the 
flame of the burner heating the copper tube is in- 
creased a little; at this moment the mercury of 
the thermometer should indicate 100 deg. C, 
the production of the steam is so regulated that 
the receiver, becoming hot rapidly, can condense 
only very small quantities. It should be observed 
whether, with rise of temperature, particles of 
oil appear in the water escaping from the con- 
denser. As soon as this phenomenon becomes 
distinct, the first portions of the distillate are 
collected in a graduated tube of 75 cubic centi- 
meters, divided into tenths and fifths. 

To prevent oil bubbles from adhering either 
to the central tube of the condenser of to the 
sides of the graduated tubes, the water of the 
condenser is allowed to heat, while suspending 
the flow, which ought not to be resumed in the 
course of the distillation, except intermittently 
and briefly, just as is necessary for preventing the 
vaporization of the oil at the exit of the con- 
denser. 

According to the cylinder oil which is to be 
analyzed, the distillation proceeds at a tempera- 
ture of 140 deg. C. to about 200 deg. C. At 
the moment when this distillation commences, 
the production of the steam is lowered a little; 
on the contrary, the flame of the burners heating 
the copper tube and the receiver is raised. 

When a third of the total quantity of oil has 
been distilled, the gas burner of the superheating 
apparatus is opened to its full extent; the burner 
of the receiver should be opened but a very little 
at a time. The distillates are collected from 10 
deg. to 10 deg. C. in similar graduated tubes 
placed on a support. 

As the operation proceeds, the admission of the 
gas to the burner under the receiver is increased 
more and more, until, at the end of the distilla- 
tion, the flame envelops its lower part. To pre- 
vent decomposition from occurring in the oil 
still remaining in the retort, the steam is al- 
lowed entrance ad libitum, and the intensity of 
the flame under the receiver lesened a little. 

A glance on the inside of the receiver allows 
of readily seeing whether all of the distillable 
components have disappeared, the operation is 
then stopped. 

The list of distillates obtained from 10 deg. 
to 10 deg. C, estimated in tenths or fifths of a 
cubic centimeter, is made out, and the number 



t 



oil. Rl l\)K 



of th> ., compared with the total litt 

■--* the 

I hope to he able to apply this method of 

to the exact determil >e dark tr- 

ain mineral oil*. The distillation in - 
joined to the table of the density', the \ 

tion, allows of readily d 
ing a lubricating oil for its precise purpose. 



A Romance of FicKle 
Fortune 

Fortunes in oil have been a will-o'-the-wisp 
many poor prospectors that it is refreshing 
to turn to brighter exper me of the 

more fortunate inhestors. There is. at Beau- 
mont, Tex., a petroleum company that has paid 
dividends in eleven months of 2500 per cent on 
its actual cash capital. It is the Paraffine Oil 
Company. It is not capitalized on the million 
share basis of one dollar share par value, cus- 
tomary with such ventures. On the contrary 
there are but sixteen shares and eight stockhold- 
ers, but the capital represents something more 
than promoters' fees — there was $7,000 actual 
cash paid in on the original $10,000 capitali- 
zation. With this fund as a starter, hacked by 
a lot of experience, the company began busi- 
ness, and it now has 24 wells, all good produc- 
ers. Some of these wells have produced 20,000 
to J- 1 1,000 barrels of oil daily, which has been 
sold at i2 cents per barrel. A simple calcula- 
tion will be sufficient to show the source of the 
large profits of nearly $200,000 in one year, 
which have been drawn as dividends by the eight 
stockholders, besides the $10,000 per month that 
is laid aside monthly for prospecting. The com- 
pany is developing constantly, as the life of an 
oil gusher is of uncertain duration. 

A stockholder in this "lucky" enterprise, when 
questioned about his experience, freely admitted 
that it was largely the result of good fortune. 
"Stories of the oil fields are similar to those of 
the mining districts," said he, "some made for- 
tunes and others lost fortunes. I know a New 
Orleans man who dropped $150,000 in a few 
months. His ground was barren. This talk 
of barren ground in such a field may sound odd, 
but it is common to see a gusher here and 150 
feet away a well that doesn't yield a gallon of 
oil a day." 



Tricks in all Trades. 



Views "f a Well-Known Operator in the Santa 
Maria Field. 

At first glance the market conditions in the 
local Santa Maria field seem very discouraging, 
but a calm analysis of the situation changes the 
aspect very materially. 

Some time ago the Pacific Coast (or Standard) 
Oil Co. published a schedule of prices they would 
pay for Santa Maria oil, delivered at Port 
Harford. 

Many of our people, knowing that there was 
no pipe lines, and that the Pacific Coast Rail- 
way Co. could not handle the oil, and that at 
the time only two companies in the field had any 
oil to sell, wondered what object the purchasing 
company could have in posting up a schedule 



and t ' 

• 
lule. 

ell-knou n fact that the I nion 

I an. I that 

Minn gusher 01 other wells 

I in no h.i- i. ict. H hich 

reliable information, to he one 
dollar per barrel. 

is neu schedule of prices hear 

ing date Januai anil in view of the 

that all the producing and transportation 



which it 

able tl 
and ell 
at present prices, thus robbing them of their 

the Santa Mai i 

a> its catspaw. 

U i ol Santa Maria nerd not m the 

I ). Co.'s letter c.t Jantian 2. as il 
intended t'ir us. The address is misleading. It 
was meant for Coalinga, bullet ton. Neuhall and 

Whittier. 




A flowing well in the Kern River Field. 



conditions in the field are still practically the 
same, and that the P. C. O. Co. did not buy a 
barrel of oil under the old schedule and cannot 
expect to under the new, the question is, what is 
its object, and what does it mean ? 

Gentlemen, there surely is a "nigger in the 
woodpile," and to the "man up the tree" it looks 
very much as though part of the woodpile is 
located in Coalinga and some other fields that 
are producing oil of refining grades, which has 
been and is being handled by the P. C. O. Co. 
That company needs the oil and needs it bad; 
in fact must have it in order to do business, 
and is it not a reasonable supposition that it wants 
to buy it as cheaply as it can? 

By saying to the Coalinga producer that the 



When we have the pipe line facilities which 
will enable us to deliver our oil on board tank 
steamers, then the question of prices will be 
adjusted, and it will not be to our disadvantage. 

Till that time comes it is of small moment 
whether the P. C. O. Co. offers five cents or 
five dollars per barrel. It knows we can't de- 
liver it. 

There are, at the present time, a number of 
pipe line propositions under consideration and 
some of them are sure to materialize soon, and 
further, there are several large refineries pro- 
jected at nearby points on th sea shore. 

So I say unto you, be not cast down in spirit, 
but he ye of good cheer, for there is a good time 
coming. 



PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 



The recent departure from New York for 
California of two immense oil tank vessels with 
a joint capacity of 60,000 harrels, has excited 
comment in California as to the probable effect 
upon the industry and the transportation of oil 
on the Pacific Coast. These two vessels, the 
one a steamer of 40,000 barrels capacity, are far 
larger than any of their kind ever seen on the 
coast, and when they are used there for trans- 
portation purposes, they will enable the Standard 
to move oil with much more ease and to stock 
depots at all points on the Pacific Coast for the 
use of ships and will go far toward hastening 
the use of oil in steam navigation on the ocean, 
which has so long been the dream of oil men, 
but has been hindered by the inability to get a 
supply at the points touched by vessels. The 
boats are coming loaded with refined oil from 
the East, and while their long trip from New 
York has attracted much attention, that is of sec- 
ondary importance to those interested in oil, 
compared with the effect upon transportation fa- 
cilities of the Pacific Coast. 



minished. It is to be hoped that the importations 
for Colonial coal this year will at least equal the 
amount delivered here in 1904, as that is the 
smallest amount imported tor several years. 



Recent Patents 



Since the departure of the S. S. Ventura last 
month there has been only two arrivals of coal 
from Newcastle, N. S. W., viz: Gael, 2909 
tons; E. B. Jackson, 1100 tons; total, 4009 tons. 



The following recently granted patents of in- 
terest to the oil trade are reported expressly for 
The Pacific Oil Reporter by J. M. Nesbit, 
Patent Attorney, Park Building, Pittsburg, Pa., 
from whom printed copies may be procured for 
1 5 cents each : 

Pumping power, D. E. Norris, Tiona, Pa., 
778,428. 

Portable well-making machinery, C. E. Glenn, 
Oakmont, Pa., 777,252. 

Well-drilling machine, A. T. Wilson, Jeffer- 
sonville, 111., 777,462. 

Well-drilling appliance, J. H. Compton, Mai- 
den, Mass., 778,951. 

Well-sinking apparatus, H. G. Johnston, Cor- 
sicana, Tex., 779,285. 

Heaving plug, G. W. Barnes, Bakersfield, 
Cal., 779,388. 




A part of the Halfmoon Bay Field, San Mateo County. 



Since the beginning of last month there have been 
but three arrivals here with 5860 tons, hence the 
quantity here in yard has been considerably di- 
minished within the past six weeks. There are 
seventeen vessels on the chartered list to load coal 
at Newcastle for here, with a carrying capacity 
of about 43,000 tons, the major portion of which 
will not arrive before April or May next. The 
stormy weather prevailing here lately has ma- 
terially increased the sale of Australian grades, 
they being in brisk demand for domestic uses. 
Prices remain unchanged, although 75 per cent 
of the Colonial coal remains under the control 
locally of one firm. The existing rates of freight 
from Australia on coal for this market are ruling 
at full figures, fifteen shillings per ton being 
present asking price; this leaves a very meagre 
profit for the importer ; this will probably lead to 
reduced shipments this year, as the British Co- 
lumbia product can be delivered here at a much 
lower figure, and is eagerly sought for by large 
consumers of steam and house coals. The oil 
product for 1904 will aggregate thirty millions 
of barrels, so it can be readily figured that the 
sale for steam fuel this year will be largely di- 



ASSESSMENT NOTICE. 

Arline Oil Company, a corporation. Principal 
place of business, San Francisco. Location 
of property, Fresno County, California. 

Notice is Hereby Given that at a meeting of 
the Directors held on the 24th day of December, 
1904, assessment No. 2 of one cent per share 
was levied upon the capital stock of the corpo- 
ration, payable on or before the 3rd day of 
February, 1905, to J. W. Pauson, Secretary, at 
the office of the Company, at Room 500 Parrott 
Building, San Francisco. Any stock upon which 
this assessment shall remain unpaid on said 3rd 
day of February, 1905, will be delinquent and 
advertised for sale at public auction, and, unless 
payment is made before, will be sold on the 27th 
day of February, 1905, to pay the delinquent 
assessment, together with costs of advertising and 
expenses of the sale. J. W. Pauson, 

Secretary. 
Room 500 Parrott Building, S. F., Cal. 



With the exception of the California oil field, 
Jennings, La., is today the most productive field 
in the United States. Its production is equal 
to the combined output of the Texas fields. One 
year ago the Jennings field was producing on an 
average of 6500 barrels of oil daily. At present, 
the daily average is 65,000 barrels, and within 
the next three months it is liable to be 100,000 
barrels. In fact, little attention is now paid to 
an oil well in the field mentioned unless it pro- 
duces 10,000 to 20,0000 barrels daily. The com- 
bined production of the field has gone as high 
as 4,000,000 barrels, and it is taxed to the ut- 
most, and new reservoirs are constantly being 
built. Fifteen thousand barrels are being shipped 
out of the field every day. The total proven 
area of the field is sixty acres, and this area is 
being constantly widened as new wells are 
brought in from day to day. 



The .Starrett Compressed 
Air Pump 



There has been filed on the Starrett Pump 
five applications for patents in the United States. 

No. 1 is the main application, covering the 
key to the situation — the principle — or, as has 
been stated, it is the "eye in the point of the 
needle," for if this principle is deviated from, 
the pump will not operate. 

This application was allowed December 14, 
1903. To quote from the company's attorney, 
Mr. Francis M. Wright, 527-28 Parrott Build- 
ing, San Francisco: "Claims 4, 8 and 10 are the 
most valuable claims as they cover the distinctive 
features of the invetnion, moreover, they cover 
it in a very broad manner and in my opinion the 
invention is very fully protected." 

No. 2 is to cover the admission of the air ex- 
haust into the discharge pipe, and creating a suc- 
tion pump without the necessity of carrying the 
exhaust air pipe back to the inlet valve on the 
compressor. 

Notification was received from Washington, 
March 4, 1904, that this application was allowed, 
but it is the policy of the company to keep it 
pending. 

No. 3 is to employ the Starrett principle to 
steam pumps (using air in the place of steam), 
while this point is covered in application No. 
1 it is of great value and advantage as preventing 
others from attempting to apply the Starrett 
principle in other ways than that used in the 
original Starrett system. 

The attorney states that this is a very valuable 
invention, especially in avoiding infringements. 
Notification was received from the Patent Office 
on March 23, 1904, that this application was 
allowed. It, too, will be kept pending. 

No. 4 is for the shifter which automatically 
shifts the air from one cylinder to the other, has 
been allowed. 

No. 5 covers the admission of the exhaust air 
into the discharge pipe when applied to a steam 
pump. It is similar to No. 2 in scope, allowed. 

Applications are allowed and pending for the 



Oil. Rl 



Fran. 

ind South Australia N 

i/il and Chili. 
It may be well tn here speak ol the . 
of appltcat N 

antN alread) installed .it 
Vre Id cl new System 

ot pumping outd be entailed. At 

such place-., the owners "i the Starrett system 
could emit their pumping on low pres- 

sure b) using air in the place oi steam and mak- 
ing the connections necessan to utilise the Star- 
rett principle, in other respects the plant to re- 
main unchanged. The prices that could be read- 
■taincil tor this work would yield large 
profits. 

Mr. Crist, the Eastern representative, when 
he learned of this patent, stated that it enhanced 
the value of the original patent at least 50 per 
cent. He »as greatlj pleased and impressed with 

it. 

I illustrate its value and application we will 
recite an instance that occurred in the Guade- 
loupe quicksilver trine near San Jose, as related 
to Mr. 1). \V. Starrett hy the superintendent, 
Mr. Davie (Mr. Starrett was employed in that 
mine five months and ha- long been acquainted 
with Mr. Davie). 

.A steam pump driven bj compressed air lifts 
from the 3 10-foot level to the 240 foot 
level, where ir i> taken hy a Cornish pump and 
carried to the surface. The Cornish pump broke 
down, the mine began to fill and Mr. Davie was 
in a serious situation. He had examined the 
Starrett system many times very carefully and 
bethought. himself to try the Starrett principle on 
his steam pump. He made the connection and 
turned on the air. With a pressure of 33 pounds 
per square inch he pumped more water the en- 
tire 300 feet than he had ever heretofore done 
with both steam and Cornish pumps. The steam 
pump referred to is a Cameron, capacity 100 gal- 
lons per minute, weight .5000 pounds. A Star- 
rett pump of like capacity weighs 200 pounds. 
Comment is unnecessary. 

During last summer, while Mr. Davie was 
making a study of the Starrett system he vol- 
unteered the statement that it would pay every 
owner of deep mines to abandon their present 
plants, even if at a total loss, and install Star- 
rett pumps. When asked if he would do it he 
said : "Certainly I would ; if I had had a Star- 
rett pump one year ago I would have saved $40,- 
000.00." 

Mr. Davidson, in charge at the Cypress Lawn 
cemetery, gave Mr. Starrett permission to make 
any desired experiments at his wells, stating, 
moreover, that if the pump acted out there as the 
mining pump did, he should install a complete 
Starrett system as soon as conditions will per- 
mit. 

Mr. Starrett put in a single cylinder pump, 
as illustrated in the pamphlet. The well given 
him is 235 feet deep, 14 inch casing, the. water 
standing to within 20 feet of surface when idle. 
It was said to be an excellent well. Plunger 
pumps were at one time used and latterly the 
Pohle system ; neither of these pumps could 
lower the water below 130 feet from the sur- 
face. The Starrett pump, 10x48 inch cylinder, 
4 inch discharge, was set 210 feet from the sur- 
face' and pumped the well down to that depth in 
less than half an hour. This demonstrated the 



• ler pump 
pump. 

np, howcv 
•■■r the well and, it :i , \|. 

t is I., be placed in his largest well. 

18 i'i' ml purchased In 

the Cvpress Lawn Cemetery Association, Mr, 
Davidson saying: "While at lirst 1 thought you 
would have to put in a double cylinder pump to 

give me a lull supply of water, there is no ipicx 

Hon now ot \oiit single cylinder giving me all 

the water I want." 

\ I I Rl SI INC i 'IMP Mils i\. 

The following clipping from the Mining and 

' Review ot August 22nd. 1905, is ot 

unusual interest because it shows the enormous 
expense attending the installation of a pumping 

plant to litt large be, lie. ,:t water to high alti- 
tudes: 

" 1 he largest Cornish pumping plant in the 

world is the huge Chapin pump of the Chapin 
Mining Co. at Iron Mountain, Mich. The 
pump is designed to pump 3,000 gallons per min- 
ute From a depth of 1,500 feet. Some idea of 
normous proportions of this pump may be 
tr.ed from its dimensions. The engine is of 

the vertical type and compound and stands 54 
rom tlie floor. The high pressure cylinder 



■ 

. profit on 



COALINGA 



Perhaps no v. ell in 

90 much talked ot a- that ot the M. K. & I . i hi 
which is the farthest down on the plains ol 
am well, and which made proven territor 

tract ol land several miles in extent. De 
spite the Ion;; ! me w hich it took to 

diill this well, owing to the great depth to which 
it had to be pur down, I). M. I), 

tnaging director, faithfullj hacked In 

ilier Stockholders, and with the work of 

drilling undei the a ion of the head 

S. ( iormley ( who is 
still rendei in mpanj 

in that capacit] ). tlir ivorl ol deve] ipmeni i on 
tinued until the well was brought in. It puts 

an immense value on the I 

land which the companj owns, and which it is 
about to continue to develop. The M. K. & T. 
developed more "grit" than any company in this 
ill 1 , and everybody was pleased that they "won 
out." It was a pleasure to me to see the oil 
Spouting out of the pipes into the big reservoir, 




The S. S. " Ventura," a pioneer oil carrying vessel of the Pacific Coast 



is 50 inches and the low pressure cylinder is 
100 inches in diameter and the stroke is 10 feet. 
The fly-wheel is 40 feet in diameter anl alone 
weighs 164 tons, without loubt the heaviest fly- 
wheel ever built. The total weight of the engine, 
exclusive of pumps and shaft works, is 600 tons. 
The pump end is attached directly to the beam 
end which overhangs the shaft. The pumps are 
the single acting Cornish type, with plungers 28 
inches in diameter and 10 foot stroke. The num- 
ber of strokes varies from four to ten. The 
pumps are arranged in series, each set having 
a lift of about 200 feet. This plant was de- 
signed and built by the E. P. Allis Co. of Mil- 
waukee." 

To transport such a plant would require 20 
cars of 30 tons each for the engine alone; the 
pump column rods and other attachments would 
probably weigh as much as the engine, making 
another 20 cars 30 tons each, or in all a train 
of 40 cars. The engine, at 20 cents per pound 
for machine work, would cost $240,000.00; the 
pump, pump column rods, tanks, etc., including 
installation of engine and pump, would cost 
about $160,000.00, making about $400,000.00 
for the entire plant. The Starrett Compressed 
Air Pumping Plant could be put in to duplicate 
the work of the Cornish pump, whi .. would 



and know that the work of worth'; men kvas 
being rewarded. 

Three large dirt reservoirs have been built 
on the company's land, adjacent to one another 
and south of the well, which, by the way, is a 
"spouter," and relieves the company of any ex- 
pense of pumping. The three reservoirs have a 
capacity of 100,000 barrels. There were about 
20,000 barrels of oil in the nearer reservoir the 
day I was there (last Wednesday). 

The present production of oil is from the 
fourth sand, three other sands having been 
struck on the way down, and we are informed 
that either one of these three sands are good and 
productive. Mr. De Long asserts, and we have 
no doubt that his statement is absolutely 
rect, that the oil sand from which this company 
is now getting oil is different from any oil sand 
tapped by any other well in the district. The 
analysis of the oil, as given by the University of 
California, would seem to bear this out, the an- 
alysis being as follow s : 

No gasoline; no benzine; no naptha; 1414 per 
cent illuminating oil; 32',^ per cent gas distil- 
late; 43V-; per cent lubricating oil; <ll i; per cent 
only of debris, or asphaltum. 

Analysis made by two other chemists practi- 
cally agree with this one. The high percem 



PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 



of lubricant renders this oil very valuable, and 
the per cent of illuminating quality is good also. 
The company will soon begin putting down its 
well No. 2. The derrick is already completed, 
and it is the most substantially constructed and 
the finest, we have no doubt, ever erected in 
the State. At least I have never seen anything 
that could compare with it. The plans for it 
were drawn by Messrs. Gormley and De Long, 
and it was put up under their direction by Rig 
Builder J. W. Ruddell. The derrick is extra 
high (82 feet), and it is very heavily timbered. 
All girts and braces are two-inch. The inclosed 
part of the derrick, below, is very commodious, 
and the rig is thoroughly inclosed from the 
weather, so that the driller will ha\ e as little 
of the elements of nature, above ground, to con- 
tend against, while sending the drill down into 
the earth to bring up the treasures of oil. Mr. 
Gormley stated that, despite the fact that the 
rig was probably the best in the Stae, it has cost 
but $250 more than the ordinary rig, and it will 
surely more than save its owners that in con- 
venience and durability. The company is going 



been in progress, improvements in conditions of 
living for the people on the place have not been 
overlooked. In fact the M. K. & T. plant looks 
like a small village out on the plains, on the 
slope of the foothills. Mr. De Long has had a 
tract 1000 by 1100 feet in size, inclosed by a 
substantial wire fence, to protect the reservoirs 
and other improvements on the place from stray 
livestock. There are gates, however, on all 
sides, and the visitor and neighbor is always 
welcome — the latch-string is always out at that 
company's place. 

The management believes in securing the best 
possible help, paying them the best wages and 
giving them every comfort of living. Married 
men only are employed, for, says Mr. Gormley, 
a married man is much more reliable help than 
a single one any time. There are already quite 
a number of small houses on the place, but these 
are to be replaced with larger structures, two of 
which are already completed, and they would 
be a credit to any California town. The new 
cook-house, consisting of a dining-room and 
kitchen, is commodious, and has an eight-foot 




A part of the Whittier Oil Field. 



to put in an extra string of tools, so that if there 
are any fishing jobs, they can be attended to 
and got away with promptly. 

y The property has always been lighted by elec- 
tricity, furnished by its own plant, and now a 
fine water system has been added. This consists 
of a large Dow pump capable of pumping 3000 
barrels of water in 24 hours. Tankage for 600 
barrels of water has been provided by three extra 
heavy galvanized iron tanks, of 200 barrels each, 
which stand upon neavy scaffolding which a 
train could pass over without danger. A four- 
inch main pipe, with two and one-inch distribut- 
ing pipes, carry the water all over the place. 
That there is an abundant water supply has been 
proven by the fact that the Dow pump was run 
to its full capacity for two weeks without de- 
creasing the supply of water in the well. 

Two 80 horse-power new boilers were shipped 
from the East on the 15 th inst, and they will, 
with a large new engine, be put in place imme- 
diately on their arrival and drilling on well No. 
2 will begin. 

But while improvements on the plant have 



porch all around. It is built. with rustic finish 
and neatly painted. Just to the east of this is 
the new residence of the superintendent, Mr. 
Gormley — a three-room structure, with rustic 
finish and porches all around. Mr. Gormley and 
family will soon be installed in their nice new 
home. 

Two more cottages are also to be erected 
right away. In fact part of the inclosed tract 
has been surveyed into lots, 50x150 feet in size, 
on which the new cottages will be erected, all 
in a row. As there is an abundance of water, 
the houses will be Supplied with all that is 
needed for irrigation, and it is expected that next 
spring there will be lawns and flowers where 
now all is barrenness and dust. Two acres of 
alfalfa will also be put out. 

The visitor to the M. K. & T. cannot but be 
surprised at the great amount of work that has 
been done there in the past year besides bringing 
in a producing well, and it looks to us as though 
Mr. De Long and his efficient assistant in the 
improvement, U. S. Gormley, are going to con- 
tinue the good work until they have not only a 



very large production of oil, but also the model 
camp of the field. 

A 50-barrel tank full of oil, which stands back 
of the C. O. T. Works in Coalinga, was set on 
fire recently by a workman who attempted to 
temper a piece of hot steel by thrusting it into 
the oil. It has been the custom in the past to 
temper steel in this fashion, and this is the first 
time that the oil has ever ignited. 

The firemen were called out and they assist- 
ed in drawing off the oil from the bottom, and 
then when the tank was nearly empty, the flames 
were extinguished. Prompt action prevented a 
serious conflagration. 

A good rain fell here the evening of the sand- 
storm. 

Train arrivals, Jan. 3, 1905: Ex-Marshal 
Woy of Fresno; Mrs. Lester. 

George Roberts' well No. 3 is expecting to 
strike oil most any moment. 

Burt Rice, late of the El Zuma Oil Company 
was in from Visalia Sunday. 

Ben Donager is here for a few days, looking 
after the interests of Schnereger & Downing. 

Sour Dough No. 2 has been operating for 
three weeks, with a production of 900 barrels 
per day. 

Joe Corey's well No. 2, which is producing 
500 barrels a day, got a little out, but Joe says 
she is all right again. 

The masquerade ball of the W. O. W., held 
last evening, was voted a complete success by both 
the dancers and the lodge. 

Those registered at the Grand Central hotel 
in the last two days were: X. S. Dobsen, A. B. 
Murray, R. B. Carey, Los Angeles; H. H. 
Welch. 

Coalinga celebrated the coming in of the new 
year by whistles from all over the field alto- 
gether, and in turn, the firing of guns, etc. 

At 1 p. m., Jan. 2, the oil tank of the Coalinga 
Iron Works caught fire and caused some excite- 
ment before being extinguished, but the damage 
done was very slight. 

The Coalinga Advertiser, a new weekly sheet, 
appeared here on Saturday, though dated Friday. 
S. Cornell certainly shows he is an active man 
by the appearance of his paper. 

Every watchman in Coalinga was out watch- 
ing the lines of some oil claim all Saturday night, 
Dec. 31, 1904. Many jokes were played and 
a good many of the boys are sorry they stayed 
from town for $6. They say there were ghosts 
on all sides. 

As many people of Kings and Fresno counties 
have not visited the oil fields, and many have not 
seen the big oil reservoir recently completed there, 
I will give a brief description of it. 

It belongs to the Associated Oil Company, 
which purchases oil in the Kern river, McKit- 
trick and Sunset fields in Kern county, in the 
oil fields of Los Angeles (in which district the 
company recently made a very heavy purchase 
of valuable oil lands) and also in the Coalinga 
district. The company owns its own pipe lines. 
While its true designation is the Associated Oil 
Company, it is generally known as the Southern 
Pacific Company, with which it is more than 
closely allied, if it is not a part. Said last named 
company is one of the largest consumers of oil 
in the State, as it has, wherever possible, con- 
verted its coal-burning engines and steamers into 
•oil burners. So it needs its own reservoirs and 
pipe lines to protect its interests. Then it has a 
vast area of land in the Coalinga field which it 
has leased out to a good many different parties 
on royalty. 

This big reservoir is some three miles north- 



on the gradual slope to the hil 

tc» hundr the M. K & 

property and very n to the wells 

of the Coaling.* . .ind other 

properties in that group. It ]<h>ihs up in thr 

p, from the plains, like a huge tabernacle, 

I its dirt color all thl 

othav be would. 

Tlii> reservoir u .i> built by excavating thr 
ground with scraper teams, an.l making a cir- 
cular wall ot the dirt thus excavated from the 
bottom. Thr ground was excavated to a depth 

<n feet, thr total height of the wall- 
feet, stated, the tank is circular in 
form and it is 174 yards across, thus taking in 
about tour acres of land. The floor and walls 
were "puddled" as the building of the reservoir 
aprr train progressed, the ground bring 
tamped, as it was wet and the teams passed 
over it. , 

To an inexperienced' person it would appear 
that dirt walls would not hold such a vast quan- 
tity of oil barrels) a, is the capacity, 
and the tank is expected to hold ; but experience 
lias demonstrated, in fields older than the Coal- 
inga field, that these dirt reservoirs are a success 
and hold the o 1 as well, nearly, as iron reser- 
voirs, besides which they are not nearlj as ex- 
pensive. The cost of such a big reservoir as this. 
though it is constructed almost entirely of dirt, 
is no small figure, as two million feet of lumber 
were used to form the braces for the roof and 
the body of the roof itself. The whole roof is 
covered with "rubberoid," a material which is 
largely replacing shingles, shakes and metal work 
for roofing, not only on small, but also on large 
buildings. 

The supports of the roof are all of wood. They 
rest on the ground, on mud sills, at the bottom 
of the reservoir, and they are of pine. My in- 
quiry whether or not the oil would not rot these 
wooden supports elicited the reply that the oil, 
in which these wooden supports are destined to 
stand probably for many years to come, would 
not be rotted by the oil, but would be preserved 
thereby. 

The interior of the big reservoir is quite dark, 
especially in the center, where one can hardly 
see to groupe about. The reservoir is ventilated 
by quite a large tower on the north end, while 
there are stairs leading to the roof from the south 
end. A stairway leads down into the big pit 
and there are also three small vents in the roof, 
to let out the gases, of which there must be con- 
siderable in such a large accumulation of oil. 

No oil has yet been turned into this big reser- 
voir, but the superintendent informed me that 
oil would probably be turned in during the pres- 
ent week, as the tankage of the company at Orro 
switch was full, and additional storage capacity 
must soon be used. W. R. Ritchie, who has 
been for years in the employ of the Associated 
in the Kern River field, has charge of the big 
reservoir and the pumping plant at Coalinga. 
Thomas Mclntyre is his assistant and S. Richard- 
son has charge of the engine which runs the 
company's pumping plant. 

Mr. Ritchie informed me, when I stated that 
I thought this was an immense reservoir, that 
the Associated Oil Company had just completed 
in the Kern river a tank twice as large as this 
—one that would hold 1,000,000 barrels. 

F. V. Dewey. 



PACIFIC i I] PORTER 

WESTERN COOPERAGE CO. 

■ un i ic ii hi r« m 
STAVES and HEADING 

For Both Tlftht and Slack Work. 
OUR 8PECIALTIE8 ARE 



WhiteSpruce Saves and Heading 
all ready to set up lor Fish, 
Pickles or Lard packages ol 
any size. 



Fir Tight Barrel States and 
Heading lor Oil, Lard, Pork, 
Beef. Etc., Etc. 

ooo 

Fir Slack Barrel Staves and Heading for Asphalt, Lime 
Cement and Bottle Barrels. 



Prompt and Courteous Attention to alt Inquiries. 



MILLS at Aberdeen, Wash, and floulton, Ore. 






te map-mak Hill, 

ich pipe : fully 

surveyed and each w All 

land holdings have been brought strictlj up to 
date and the map is a fine specimen of the map- 
makers' art. It you arc interested in the I 
inga field you should not be without one. Price 
for large blur-prints. I >rder direct 

from the makers or from the Pacific Oil Re- 
PORTER, ,il>> Pine street, San Francisco. 



Lacy Manufacturing Company 



Manufacturers of 



Steel Water Pipe 
General Sheet 
Iron Works 
Oil Well Casing 
Oil Stills 



OIL STORAGE AND WAGON TANKS 



Works: Cor. New Main and Date streets, P. O. Box 231, Station C. 

Baker Block Telephone Main 196 

Office, 334 North Main Street, Los Angeles, Cal. 





BATES' 

PATENT CASING TONGS 



1416-1426 19th St.. Bakerstield. Cal. 



Fills a long-felt want. No more need of 
pole and rope for screwing up casing. Bates 
Tongs can be applied to the casing anywhere 
In driving or pulling without danger of injury 
or parting casing. 

Set No. i, with any two size jaws from 9$^ 
to 13^ inches. 

Set No. 2, with any two size jaws fro-n 4 to 
gYs inches. 




CAR TANKS AND STORAGE STANKS 

FOR ALL USES 
We Carry in Stock Car Tanks of following sizes: We Carry in Stock Storage Tanks for Oil 

6,000 Gallons 

7,000 

8,000 



.4 



of all sizes up to and including 
eS.OOO BARREL-S 



and can mount on wood or steel underframes. 



Oil Refineries Complete Our Specialty 



WARREN CITY BOILER WORKS 
office: and \a/orks:-warre:n. ohio. 



10 



PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 




Bullfrog Extension Mining 
Company 



Moneyed men are showing their confidence in the company by ordering large blocks of 
stock. Since our advertisement of last week appearing in this paper, we sold to two men ten 
thousand shares each. We have placed more than a score of smaller orders for a few hundred 
to a few thousand shares each. All 20 cent stock will soon be gone. Wire your reservation of 
shares. Investigate and if you do not want the stock, you are under no obligation to take it. 
Good ore coming from the shaft of the Bullfrog Extension Company. Three Hundred feet 
away on the Bullfrog Mine a ledge has been uncovered at a depth of 30 feet carrying values 
above $5000. A sample of that ore is in the business office of the Daily Bulletin of San Francisco. 
Both companies sinking on the same big ledge. Bullfrog will be the biggest mining camp of 
Nevada within a year. A beautifully illustrated prospectus showing the mines of Goldfield and 
Bullfrog, with much interesting data sent on request. 



Use the Mires. It Pays: 



DEBENTURE SURETY COMPANY (Inc.), 

Rialto Bldg., A 10, San Francisco, Cal. 



BUY A BARLOW & HILL MAP 



OF THE OIL 
Large Blue Prints, 
Large Blue Prints on Linen, 
Book of Indexed Maps, 



FIELDS 



$1.50 

3.00 

.50 



SPECIAL MAPS MADE TO ORDER 

Prices on Application 

2f/>e Pacific Oil Reporter 



318 PINE STREET 



DIRECTORS. 
M. Grossmayer. 
S. Fleisher. 
J. B. Bonetti. 
T. R. Finley. 
S. A. Johnson. 
C. F. Bramming. 
James Smith. 



SAN FRANCISCO 



OFFICERS. 
M. Grossmayer, Pres. 
S. Fleisher, Vice Pres. 
J. B. Bonetti, Treas. 
T. R. Finley, Sec'y- 
S. A. Johnson, Gen. Mgr 



Barca Oil Company 



CAPITALIZATION, 



$500,000; 



PAR VALUE STOCK, $1.00 PER SHARE. 



The property of this Company consists of 250 acres of land, situated one-half mile north of 
the famous Purissima well of the Union Oil Company, which has been flowing 500 barrels of oil 
daily for the past year, and it is directly in line between that well and the same company's 
famous 12,000-barrel gusher on the Hartnell Tract. 

We are offering enough stock in our Company at 25 cents per share to drill our first well, 
and at this price the stock is the best and safest investment so far offered in the Santa Maria Dis- 
trict, and a sure money-maker for those who invest. 

Our well No. 1 is now drilling and will be pushed to completion as rapidly as possible. 

For further information address 



BARCA OIL COMPANY, 



SANTA MARIA, CAL. 



KERN 

The statement of M. H. Whittier of the As- 
sociated Oil Company that he can see no pros- 
pect for any considerable increase in the prices 
of fuel oil within the near future is reinforced bv 
similar expressions of opinion on the part of 
many of the directors of the Independent Oil 
Producers' Agency and other oil men who have 
geen keeping a close watch on the oil industry 
in this state. According to the statements of 
men who should be the best posted upon the sub- 
ject the present available market on the Pacific 
Coast is practically supplied. If the price of oil 
remains low there will, of course, be a steady 
increase in its consumption as fuel, but during 
the past year this increase has not kept pace with 
the increase in production and with the numer- 
ous undeveloped fields that are known to exist 
in the state and with a few more that will prob- 
ably be discovered it seems impossible that the 
local consumption, that is ithe consumption 
throughout the Pacific Coast states, should over- 
take the supply. There remains the market of 
the ocean going steamers and in a general way 
the market of the world, but it is an observed 
fact that any staple commodity that goes into 
the market of the world generally brings the 
producer very little more than what it actually 
costs him to produce it. It is so with wheat and 
corn and cotton and coal and beef and with all 
the staple commodities that come from -the soil, 
and it will probably be the same with oil on this 
coast, at least until the time comes when, the 
supplies in the ground begin to be exhausted. 
We expect that when the oil business settles 
down a little more it will be a paying business 
for the men who have good properties and make 
a study of economical -methods of production, but 
we do not expect it to be a bonanza for everyone 
who has a few dollars to invest in oil stocks. The 
sooner the general public settles down to the 
idea that the oil business is a business and not 
a speculation the better it will be. The time has 
gone by when a crowd of men at the club can 
pass around the hat for a collection to punch 
down a gusher and all go to Europe on the pro- 
ceeds. — Echo, Jan. 7th. 

The two days' session of the directors of the 
Independent Oil Producers' Agency closed Wed- 
nesday night with a night session. The result 
of the meeting was that the contract with the 
Associated Oil Company was ratified by the 
unanimous vote of all the directors present, which 
included representatives of nearly all the larger 
producers. A number of other matters pertain- 
ing to the new organization's business were dis- 
cussed and the whole situation of the oil business 
of the state was threshed Over. 

The action of the directors in ratifying the 
contract was largely a matter of form, as their 
action was a foregone conclusion. In fact, all 
the companies in the Kern river field that are 
connected with the pipe lines for the delivery of 
oil have been delivering oil on this contract since 
a few days after it was negotiated between the 
executive committee and the directors of the As- 
sociated. 

This contract has the distinction of being the 
largest single contract that has ever been nego- 
tiated on the Pacific Coast. The result, as 
stated by President McQuigg yesterday, will be 
to start the pumps going in every well controlled 
by the agency. The details of the contract are 
not given out and little more is known concern- 
ing them- that was published in the Echo at the 
time the contract was negotiated. A portion of 
the oil, however, is to be stored for the present 






I 

! ruisi- 
inil thr proper i tlu-v 

Jan. 7th. 
oil mm question thr wisdom .>t 
*h f P ntracl uitli 

'he > md while thr California^ he- 

- that the independents had the upper hand 
' n ,i: thc> could 

'>»!* •inn tur .1 ten months. th< 

•he rffeit of thr ratification 
of the agreement on business in this country. 
The contract mean-, that before January I next 
millions of ban will he marketed, for 

there can be no question but what the Standard 
will he an eager buyer at the rate now estab- 
lished, and this means that the pumps that have 
been idle will start again, ami activity will be 
resumed in the fields. Within the year the pro- 
ducers can hardly expect to secure a better 
price than that established by the contract with 
the Associated, but if the oil men themselves 
do not prosper through the transaction the cost 
of production will make business tor this com- 
munity, and the million or more dollars derived 
from the sale of oil will largely find its way 
into the channels of local trade. This means 
better business for Bakersfield, better time- For 
the merchants and better days for the farmers. 
All classes will reap a prolit unless, indeed, it be 
the oil men themselves. From their standpoint 
it is a pity that their necessities forced them into 
any such compact and it is to be hoped that be- 
fore the year is over, initial steps will have been 
taken looking to the breaking of the bonds by 
which they are now held by seeking a means of 
to the ocean for their product, that can- 
not be controlled ' by the Standard Oil Trust. 
I nless they do this, twelve months hence will 
find them very much in the same position that 
they are today. — Californian. 

The case of the Sioux Oil Company vs. J. W. 
Kelly, Sheriff, was heard in Judge Mahon's 
court. This suit grew out of a seizure by the 
sheriff of certain property to be sold. The court 
held that the Sioux Oil Companp had no title 
to the property. 

The case of A. D. McKay vs. P. W. E. Rogers 
was argued in Judge Bennett's court today and 
submitted. 

A petition for settlement and distribution of 
final account has been filed by the administrator, 
S. D. Mullins. 

F. W. Main, M. Petersen and James Stavert 
have been appointed appraisers in the estate of 
J. A. Simmons, an insane person. 

A complaint to quiet title to lands in township 
1 0, range 1 1 , has been begun by S. P. Radovich 
against the Oueen Esther Mining and Milling 
Company. 



One thousand acres of land west of Foun- 
tain City, Ind., is being leased for the purpose 
of making a test for oil. One dollar per acre is 
being paid for the leases with a guarantee of 
one-seventh of all the product that may be se- 
cured. Melvin Coggeshall is doing the soliciting, 
and it is understood that but little effort is neces- 
sary on his part to close the deals with the farm- 
ers. But little faith is being put in the project 
by citizens and the oil company's invasion is caus- 
ing no excitement, owing to the dismal failure 
that has already been experienced in drilling a 
well there, and the poor success of operators in 
other parts of the county. It is understood, how- 
ever, that the company securing the leases in- 
tends giving the field a thorough test. 



PACIFIC • KR 

Flow ot Mil turn! Ga« 
Increased by . . . 

Cooper's Gas Lift 

Also flow of water 
or oil Increased and 
gas saved 

A. S. COOPER, C.E., 

219 Crocker Building 
San Francisco, Cal. 



ALEXANDER & CHURCH 

Attorneys and Counselors at Law 



Will draw legal Instruments of 

all kinds, practice In all courts, 
oryjinize corporations, and at tend, 
In general, to other law business 
for corporations and others. 



Of fi - e, 404 Crose ley Building 

SAN FRANCISCO 



Telephone Main r>s7 



..OIL TANKS.. 

Oil Stills, Car Tanks, Riveted Pipe, Storage Tanks of 
every capacity and every description. Write for Estimates 

WM. GRAVER TANK WORKS 



77 Jackson Boulevard 



CHICAGO, ILL. 



North Machine Co. 

JOHN G. NORTH, President and Manager 

Machinists and Engineers 

115=117 Beale St., San Francisco, California 



YK/E make a specialty of Oil Well Tools and are always 
ready to quote prices on Fishing Tools, Hand Tools, Etc. 

WRITE US TO-DAY ! 
If you want to invest your money in a sound business proposition where you are sure 
to receive ten dollars for every one dollar invested 

BUY BUFFALO-CALIFORNIA OIL STOCK. 
This company is incorporated under a special act of Congress providing for the incor- 
poration of companies in the District of Columbia, making our stock absolutely non-assessable 
We hold some of the most valuable oil property in the well known 

HALFMOON BAY DISTRICT, 
San Mateo County, California, 
Now possessing many fine oil wells producing 52 to 55° gravity oil. But we cannot tell it all 
here. Write us for full particulars. 

Correspondence with reliable brokers and agents solicited. 

BUFFALO-CALIFORNIA OIL CO., 
Fletcher Block, 
Livermore. California. 

C. V. Hall Iron Works 

Los Angeles Office, 222 Wilcox Buildng, LOS 'MGELES, CAL. 

All kinds of Oil Well Tools. 
Very Best Materials 

Fishing Tools and Heavy Forging and 
Machine Work 

ASK YOUR SUPPLY HOUSE FOR 

C. V. H. TOOLS 

The C. V. H. Chain Tongs can be had through 
any dealer in oil well supplies. 

Jfddress 

CHARLES VICTOR HALL 

222 Wilcox Building, Los Angeles, California 




12 



PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 



ADOLPH L. STONE 

Crude Oil and Asphalt Broker 

Contracts for Crude Oil in the Santa Maria, Kern River and Coalinga Districts 
California Asphalt Shipments arranged for all parts of the world 

All grades Asphalt for Street Paving, Roofing, Varnish Manufacturers, Etc. Samples on application 

Office, 137 Montgomery Street ... €}«»»» Fvanficrn P a l 

Mail Address, P O. Box 2520 - - - » an UranClSCO, %*,&!. 





FOR SALE. 


We manufacture the best 




lubricating oils for oil 


1000 shares Pinal Oil stock at $3.60 per share. 


drillers 


3000 shares Brookshire Oil stock at $1.00 per 


KING KEYSTONE OIL CO., 


share. 


204 Front St., San Francisco. 


W. E. BARNARD, 
476 Tenth Street, Oakland, California. 




H 



KROHN 
WIRE ROPE SOCKET 



THE ONLY SOCKET USING A BALL CLUTCH 



LASTING QUALITIES UNEQUALLED 



PATENT 



CLUTCH 




DEVICE 



L 



Fop Sale by ALL 

OIL WELL 5UPPLY HOUSES 



LLEWELLYN IRON WORKS 

SOLE MANUFACTURERS 

LOS ANGELES, CAL. 

Write for Circular 




CALIFORNIA STOCK AND OIL EX- 
CHANGE. 



The following are stock sales in the Califor- 
nia Stock and Oil Exchange in the formal sessions 
held for the week ending Wednesday, Jan. 11: 
Associated Bonds — 

1,000 bonds at 85.50 

Associated Stock — 

4,272 shares at . . . : 

California-Standard — 

500 shares at 



.27 



.19 



Forty — 

11,400 shares at 
Home — 

100 shares at 

200 shares at 

Independence — 

1,000 shares at 

1,000 shares' at 

Junction — 

68 shares at 



50 

43 

45 

29 

30 

.17 

2,980 shares at 20 

Oil City Petroleum — 

1 ,400 shares at 67 

3,000 shares at 69 

13,000 shares at 70 

Pittsburg — 

930 shares at 10 

Sterling — 

100 shares at 2.00 



Following are the latest quotations 
of oil companies listed on the Califo 
and Oil Exchange: 

Bid. 

Alma 

Apollo 

Ass. Oil Co. Stk. Tr. Cer. .27 

Caribou 7.00 

Central Point Con 70 

Chiuago Crude 53 

Claremont 

Coalinga & Pacific 50 

Forty 49 

Four 55 

Giant 24 

Hanford 185.00 

Home 43 

Imperial 

Independence 29 

Tunction 

Kern 5 . 75 

Kern (New) 

Kirn River 

Monarch of Arizona 

Monte Cristo 75 

Nevada County 

Occidental of W. Va 

Oil City Petroleum 69 

Piedmont 07 

Pittsburg 08 

Reed Crude 2.10 

Senator 70 

Sovereign 31 

Sterling 2.00 

Superior 03 

Thirty-Three 

Toltec 25 



for stocks 
rnia Stock 

Asked. 
.85 
.38 



10.00 



.22 

.82% 



.50 
.56 



.50 

16.50 

.30 

.21 

"36 
12.00 
.30 
.85 
.40 
.08 
.70 



.33 
2.25 

8.25 



READING 



( IRON ) 



Drive Pipe = = Casing = = Tubing = = Line Pipe 



r 18 THE BEST 



|3 |_| HfPTDO^lVI C*{\ 509 MISSION STREET 

lV« II. nCKKUll KJU. 8AN FRANCISCO, CAL. 






PACI1 U 



The Kern Ri-. • declared ■ 

dfvidn avahlr 

Januar 

The total dividend paid on oil I on 

thr C:ilit.. 

ccmbcr. I'M. was $105,000, making a total to 

date of £5,714,2 

nmparative inactivity, 
thr Mood) Gulch <iil district, situated two miles 
southerly from the town of Alma, on the Santa 
'a imcr more, according to the 
San Jose Mercury, thr scene of operations that 
give promise of expanding into an extensive and 
profitable output of the finest oil produced on 
thr Pacific C'oa^t. Three companies are now 
d in this district, contiguous to one an- 
other, and two of them ha\e been pumping oil 
tor Mime time past. The third companj will 
soon begin to sink a well on its newlj acquired 
property. 

The Monte (,'n'sto Oil Compart] has declared 
a regular nionthh dividend of 1 cent per share, 
amounting to $5000, payable January 10. 

The Blue Goose Oil Company is paying hack 
ckholders in the form of a dividend the lasi 
$1.50 per share. 
The increase in production in oil from the 
Coalinga held in the past year has been some- 
thing phenomenal. But a little over a year aso 
the total production of the field was not what 
it is now daily over the Southern Pacific railroad 
alone, to say nothing of what is now going out 
over the Standard (Pacific) pipe line to the bay, 
and the other pipe line (the C. O. & T. Co.), 
which carries the oil over the Coast Range of 
mountains to the Bay of Monterey, where there 
is deep water in which the ocean steamers can 
come and load. 

The shipments of oil in different ways from 
Coalinga at the present time are as follows: 

Through the Standard (Pacific Coast Oil Co.) 
line, 10,000 barrels daily. 

Through the Coalinga Oil and Transporta- 
tion Co.'s pipe line to Monterey, just completed 
a few months ago, 3500 barrels. 

By the Southern Pacific oil cars, 4000 barrels 
per day. 

The Monte Cristo Oil Company's dividend 
of 1 cent per share is now payable. 

Nearly two weeks ago, says the San Jose 
Mercury, the Alma Paraffine Oil and Paint Com- 
pany pumped its first oil from the well on the 
northerly side of the gulr.ii, on property leased 
by them from Mrs. A. P. Logan of La Honda, 
San Mateo county. In addition to this tract, they 
have adjoining properties under lease which it is 
their intention to develop. Twenty-one barrels 
of fine oil was pumped from this first well in a 
few hours, and it is averaging at least ten barrels 
a day. This oil is selling in San Francisco for 
something more than $4 a barrel. The com- 
pany's tanks are full, and they will at once pro- 
ceed either to construct other and larger tanks 
or to lay a pipe line down to the county road 
or to the old oil station on Los Gatos creek. 
Down in the gulch the Commercial Paraffine Oil 
and Paint Company has been pumping two of 
the old wells for a few months past with great 
success, and they also will soon sink a new well. 
In addition to their present tanks they are now 
erecting a 20,000 gallon tank for the temporary 
storage of their oil, which is of the same quality 
as that supplied by the Alma Company's weli. 
A third company, which is operating successfully 
in the Coalinga fields, recently purchased 120 
acres on the south side of the gulch from G. 
Heuter. This transaction was closed only after 
a thorough examination of the fields, and the re- 
sulting conviction that they could make a profit- 
able investment there in the development of oil. 
This company is arranging to sink a well on its 
new property. 



FRESNO COUNTY ABSTRACT COMPANY 

Incorporated I'nder the Laws of California January 21, 1901. 

Capital Stock $100,000.00 

rui_i_v PAID UP 

SEARCHERS OF RE CORDS AND CONVEYANCE 

Abstracts ol Title Carefully Compiled at Reasonable Rates. 

NO. 1115 K ST., FRESNO, CAL. 

SMITH, EMERY <£l CO. 

Chemical Engineers = 




ANALYSES 

PETROLEUM --- Calorific Value, 
Fractional Distillation, Refining, Vis= 
cosity, Freezing, Candle Power, Burn- 
ing, Tests, Etc. Boiler Feed & Drink- 
ing Water. Umpire Work on Oil Contracts. 

83-85 New Montgomery Street 

SAN FRANCISCO 




CLOT & CRIST MACHINE CO. 

Designers and Builders of Special and Labor=Saving Machinery 

Estimates Furnished on Power and Pumping Plants Complete 

Special Attention Paid to the Repairing of Steam Pumps and Other Machinery 

manufacturers of THE BEST PUMP ON EARTH 

For Water Works and Mining Purposes 
For Oil Pipe Lines and Oil Burning Plants 

Artesian Deep Well and Sinking Pumps 

Electric Driven Pumps of Every Kind 



AGENTS FOR 

3= Horse Power Stickney Gasoline Engine 

Telephone John 596 

137=139 Beale Street, San Francisco 




R. P. WADDELL 

GENERAL AGENT FOR 

\ Ray and Dandy Windmills 

PUMPS, PIPING, TANKS, FRAMES, 

GALVANIZED STEEL AND WOOD TOWERS 

Aermotor Mills and Repairs 

ESTIMATES ON IR RIGA T ING OUTFITS 

35 Beale St., San Francisco 

Branch Office: 353 11th St.. Oakland, Cal. 



H. B. GUTHREY 

Oil Well Contractor 

Specifications furnished on wells of any depth 

:====: in any country ===== 

WATER SHUT OFF IN OIL WELLS 

Many valuable oil properties in this state saved by our prtcess 
which is sure and permanent 

Our references are our past customers 

H. B. GUTHREY, 

COALINGA, CAL. 




14 



PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 



ALASKA MOSQUITO HEAD NET 



A Perfect Protection Against Insect Pests 




Adopted by the United States 
Government as the Standard for 
use in the army. 

Over 150,000 of these nets sent 
to the Philippines. 

Invented for and in general use 
in mosquito-infested Alaska. 

Folds up compactly and goes 
easily into the pocket. 

Made of specially prepared gal. 
v?nized steel wire and the finest 
and strongest netting. 

Invaluable for hunters, campers 
and travelers. 

Can be worn day or night with- 
out inconvenience. 



*>A**ysAA^wWS^^AA^VvVSAA/VW 



Made in Two Varieties. 

No. 1. Made of finest netting, sure protection against mosquitos. 50 cents, 
No. 2. Made of very fine, but strong, imported lace, for midges and black 
flies, $1.00. 

If your dealer does not handle them, write direct 
to the manufacturer and we will mail on receipt of 
price. 

ALASKA MOSQUITO BEAD NET CO. 

318 P1NB STREET SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 



A Business 
Proposition 

We all seek the most comforts 
this life at the minimum expenditure 
of labor or cash. If you are going 
East you will find the 

Union Pacific 



ahead of all others on the above 
basis. At the same time you reach 
your destination quicker. 
Drop me a postal and I will call and 
explain everything. 

S. P. BOOTH, 

General Agent U. P. R. R. Co. 
No. 1 Montgomery Street, San Francisco. 



Think not of what they pay, but of what 
they get for what they pay. 



WISE BUYERS 

Strictly Reliable Goods in all Lines 

OIL WELL 



Machinery 



AND 



SUPPLIES 



BOILERS 
ENGINES 

Steam Pumps 




BOVAIRD & SEYFANG DRILLING ENGINE 



IF YOU WANT 




B 



BOSTON CASING 

We have it in all sizes 



LET US SHOW YOU 
HOW WE TREAT 
OUR CUSTOMERS 



MACHINE SHOP 

Tools and Equipments 



Pacific Coast Manufacturing Co. Los Angeles, Cal. 



PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 



Vol. 6. No. 12 



San Francisco, Cal., Saturday, Jan. 21, 1905 



Price lO Cents 



PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 

Published Weekly. 

The Oil Authority ol the 
Endorsed by California Petroleum Miners' Asa'n. 



1-^^ l I 1 .lulling in 1 1 it- state ol La 
B I &■ during the past year ha 
Rf?y the bringing in ol some of tli 



M\ri\ K. Wiw. Proprietor. 

iw. Editor and Manager. 



OFFICE AND EDITORIAL ROOMS 

118 Pine Street - - San Francisco. California 
Telephone, Hush 

TERMS. 

One Year $ 

Six Months 1.50 

Three Months 1.00 

Single Copies 10 

STRICTLi IN ADVANCE. 

Money should be sent by Postal Order, Draft 
or Registered Letter, addressed to Pacific Oil 
Reporter. 318 Pine Street, San Francisco, rooms 
31-32.13. Communications must be accompanied 
by writer's name and address, not necessarily for 
publication, but as a guarantee of good faith. 

Kntcred in the Postoffice at San Francisco, Cal- 
ifornia, as second class matter. 

Latest Quotations 

Following are the latest quotations for Califor- 
nia crude oil at the wells as offered by the Pa- 
cific Coast Oil Company : 

COALINGA. 

Price 
Gravity at 60 deg. temperature. per barrel. 

Oil of 22 deg., up to, biit not including 24. .$0.20 
Oil of 24 deg., up to, but not including 25 . . .30 
Oil of 25 deg., up to, but not including' 26. . .35 
Oil of 26 deg., up to, but not including 27 . . .40 
Oil of 27 deg., up to, but not including 28 . . .45 
Oil of 28 deg., up to, but not including 29. . .50 
Oil of 29 deg., up to, but not including 30. . .55 
The Associated Oil Company is offering 17% 
cents for fuel oil. 

SANTA MARIA. 

Gravity at 60 deg. Price per barrel 

Temperature. at Port Harford. 

24 deg. up to but not including 25 $ .25 

25 deg. up to but not including 26 30 

26 deg. up to but not including 27 35 

27 deg. or better 40 

KERN RIVER. 

All oil of 14 deg. gravity or better, except that 
contracted by the Pacific Coast Oil Co., is being 
taken by the Associated Oil Company at 18 cents 
per barrel under a year's contract with the Inde- 
pendent Agency. 

EASTERN QUOTATIONS. 

Pennsylvania $1.50 

Tiona 1-65 

Corning 1.17 

New castle \A2 

North Lima • ■ "1 

South Lima % 

Indiana 96 

Somerset " ' 

Ragland 58 

Petrolea (Ont.) 1.43 

KANSAS-INDIAN TERRITORY. 

Oil of 32 degrees gravity $0.87 

Oil of 31V. degrees gravity 82 

Oil of 31 degrees gravity 77 

Oil of 30% degrees gravity 72 

Oil of 30 degrees gravity 67 

Oil of 29% degrees gravity 62 

Oil of 29 degrees gravity 57 

Oil of 28% degrees gravity 52 

Oil of 28 degrees gravitv 47 



111* drilling in the State o( California 

resulted in 
the most 

productive oil wells in the world. It 

is bin a year ago that La GradoM company, in 

thr Santa Maria held, brought in what was, at 
that time, the largest producer on the Coast, four 
hundred barrels daily. It was 3,200 feet deep. 
The second well of La Graciosa came in at 
eight hundred barrels. Soon after the Union 
( )il Company's well near iximpoc commenced to 
Hon 500 barrels a day. The Western Union 
Company uot a 1200-barrel well after having 
spent more than SI (ill. (MM) in drilling seventeen 
shallow wells that did not produce, altogether, 
than 500 barrels daily. Then came the 
"Union" gusher on the Hartnell tract, which is 
by all conceded to be the most productive well 
in the United States, if not in the world. This 
field has been no exception. The Westmoreland- 
Coalinga, M. K. & T. and Forty companies' wells 
in Coalinga are notable exceptions. Now comes 
the report of a 5000-barrel well in the Pico 
Canyon, Newhall district, brought in at 2700 feet. 
The theory of a deep sand in all the fields of the 
State seems well grounded and it is quite likely 
that there will be a great deal of deep prospecting 
for some time to come. While a 3000-foot well 
is expensive the results obtained are so much more 
gratifying that many will not hesitate at the 
venture and a deep sand once located in a locality 
enhances the value of a vast amount of surround- 
ing property. So many deep wells producing 
such a vast amount of oil is likely to double up 
the production of the State at a rate that will not 
be incentive to better prices to the producer. 



The Californian has devoted a column and a 
half of its January 16th issue in a foolish attempt 
to cover up its former attitude towards the In- 
dependent Oil Producers' Agency so apparent in 
its first issues after the contract with the As- 
sociated Oil Company was made. It was really 
amusing to see how quickly the Californian met 
with a change of opinion in this respect — in one 
issue heartily condemning the action of the In- 
denendent Agency and in the next strongly un- 
holding it. We happen to know that the Cali- 
fornian took the stand it did because of its not 
getting the news of the contract as soon as it 
would have liked to and that its change of at- 
titude was caused by a little advice to "get wise," 
to use an "elegant term." Tt is an easy matter to 
accuse a publication of subsidy with the Standard 
Oil Company, but we defy anyone to produce evi- 
dence that will show any such condition to exist. 
We sometimes wish there was a way to "graft" 
a few hundred or a few thousand from the Stan- 
dard and do not hesitate to say that we have 
many times attempted to get support from it as 
well as other large producers and marketers, but 



we have \<-t to receive our first dollar in support 
from the Standard. Associated or Pacific Coast 
companies, although some of our smaller i 
rations have always given their generous support 
to the journal. We run our publication in our 
own way, be it good or bad, and our attitude, 
past, present and future, is governed by our own 
convictions and we would appreciate any evidence 
to the contrary. 



If the Standard, Associated and Pacific Coast 
oil companies are "pooled," why don't someone 
rake steps to an investigation? The Sh> 
anti-trust law would speedily take care of the 
violators, could evidence be produced that would 
indicate such a combination to exist. No, no 
one would attempt to deny that such a condition 
exists, nor do we know of anyone that would, un- 
der oath, attempt to affirm it. Such guess work 
amounts to naught. Why don't some one of the 
many suffering companies of the State insist on 
an investigation and use some of their super- 
fluous knowledge to bring about a conviction? 
The columns of the Pacific Oil Reporter are 
open to any expose that is accompanied by affida- 
vit of its author. 



To be sure, President Roosevelt has ordered 
an investigation into the modus operandi of the 
Standard Oil Company and it is said that a party 
is on the way from Washington to conduct the 
investigation. He will want all the evidence he 
can get and we hope he will get enough of it 
to put the monopoly out of business. Facts only 
will be desired — the pleas will be made by the 
attorneys in case of an indictment by the Federal 
Grand Jury, to w'hom the result of the investi- 
gation will be reported if sufficient evidence of 
guilt is secured. There are few who do not 
believe that the Standard is getting a rebate from 
the railroads. The Pacific Oil Reporter be- 
lieves such a condition exists that through its ex- 
istence the Rockefeller monopoly may thrive, yet 
we have no proof of it and the retail price of oil 
is always kept sufficiently high that there may 
seem to be a few cents of profit above the pro- 
ducers' price and open freight rate. Of course 
this is so; didn't the Standard go up against two 
or three Grand Juries because it sold oil at a price 
less than cost, plus the freight rate? 



BIG STRIKE AT NEWHALL. 

* It is reliably reported that the Pacific 

* Coast Oil Company has made a big strike * 

* in Pico canyon, in the Newhall district. 

* Our Los Angeles advice is to the effect 

* that at 2700 feet the well came in a 

* tremendous gusher of 40 gravity oil, 

* starting off at 5,000 barrels. Inquiry 

* at the Pacific Coast Oil Company's head- 

* quarters here confirmed the report of the 

* strike but it was claimed that the well had 

* sanded up and its capacity was unknown. 



PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 



South Sea. Fish Oils. 



The fish oil industry of the southern seas is 
one that is not often written about, because of the 
remoteness of the same. Since the opening of 
the traffic between the United States and the 
Philippine Islands, the fishermen and oil men 
have been met with and more learned about their 
habits and processes of manufacture of the oils 
than commonly. The oil of the southern seas 
is obtained from herring, shark, cod, and occa- 
sionally whale. The sperm whale is of course 
the best producer, but this species is not flagrant 
in the southern seas. The whale usually found 
is small in size and the head reservoir does not 
contain very large quantities of the oil. Among 
the smaller Cataceans, the porpoises, the puffy 
dunters, and grampuses, an excellent grade of oil 
is secured for commercial purposes by the natives 
who ply the waters many days and nights seeking 
the specie. They may be seen at work with flar- 
ing lights far out on the waters. They search 
the beaches for stranded big fish of the seas. Of 
the true fish oils of the southern seas, the oil is 
secured from the liver of the fish and other por- 
tions, in rather odd ways, owing to the crude 
devices employed by the natives. The livers when 




FlS»I 



T,j, % 



removed from the fish are examined, washed and 
laid away in rows on shelves to dry. They are 
then exposed to a heat of medium temperature 
in pans, for about an hour. After cooling, the 
oil which has separated is scraped off and strained 
through fabric texture into vats. 

We show in figure 1 one of the treating devices 
of native construction, consisting of the masonry 
oven affair, with the metal in sheets for lining and 
braces, represented by the dark portions. The 
portions between the shetes of metal are packed 
with clay and stone, making a solid wallwork. 
There is an opening left in the base for the fire 
as at b. The opening is made likewise in the 
upper half for the setting of the portable cruci- 
ble a. This affair is manipulated by a rope which 
extends over the grooved wood wheels at c and 
can be drawn by hand. This affords a means 
for treating the oily matters in the crucible over 
fire heat. The arrangement of shelving for cool- 
ing the oils in pans, and for the settling purposes 
is shown in section in figure 2. The natives 
use considerable stone work in these operations. 



The shelves are wood slabs cut from the hard 
wood trees and are thick and strong and able to 
hold considerable weight. The walls of the con- 
trivance are stone, mud and clay. Sometimes 




THE NATIVE FISHERMAN GETTING FISH FOR 
MAKING OILS. 

cement is at hand and is used. More often mud 
is the agent for making the stone walls. 

FILTERING. 

The natives secure vast quantities of fish in 
nets, placing the same in such a way that they 
can be drawn by boats, as several different crews 




SOLDIERS EXAMINING ONE OF THE BIG NATIVE 
TURTLES FROM WHICH THE FILIPINO 
GETS OILS. 

operate together in getting the smaller fish. The 
proceeds are equally divided. The oils secured 
from the fish must be filtered and the filtering 
processes of the natives involve the employment 
of some strange devices. One of the settling 




NATIVE BOATS TOUCHING AT MANILA WITH FISH 
OIL FOR MANUFACTURE. 

tanks is used first, as shown in figure 3, which is 
a cross-sectional drawing. 

The oils are permitted to stand in this kettle 
until settling is complete. The straining is now 



effected by using pads of cloth of finer mesh 
or weave than before, through which the oils 
are forced by their own weight, settling into the 
bag-like arrangements. Gradually the oil oozes 
and drops through the texture, leaving behind 
considerable foreign substance which is fed to 
the hogs. The fine oils which have penetrated 
are quite thoroughly sifted and in readiness for 
the subsequent operations. In figure 4 is shown 
a drawing of one of the tediously constructed 
shaking apparatuses of native design. This is 
built up with arms suspended below _so as to 
support the cradle. This cradle is a box about 
four feet long, two feet wide and eight inches 
high. The supporting arms are marked f, f. 
They are pivoted in brackets. Thus the cradle 
can be swung to and fro. Inside the cradle is 
the nest, into which the compositions for sifting 
are placed. The bottom of the nest is made with 
sifting wires or wires crossed to a fineness neces- 
sary for sifting purposes. Sometimes this affair 
is shaken by hand, while again there is a wheel 
with a lever and this is turned and causes' to 
give the necessary motion to the cradle and conse- 
quently the nest. The siftings fall through below 
and are caught. One of the settling tanks seen 
in Manila is shown in figure 5 consisting of two 




/^' ~ _ ., :^>> 


"■ m?Tnu mr-im wp-m 



Jtiq Q 



10-inch diameter metal pipes, adjusted one above 
the other in eight foot lengths. 

The workmen erect a charcoal fire under the 
lower line and the heat thus generated causes 
the fumes to rise to the upper pipe, where the 
alternating heating and cooling operation pro- 
duces the settling process desired. The oily mat- 
ters have to be drained off and treated with the 
sun-exposure or heat-exposure processes. 

I found that the native fish oil venders used 
the bamboo tube to a large extent in the peddling 
of the oils. Often the empty bottles are collected 
from about the hotels and restaurants and filled 
with the oils, even when the bottles are marked 
with the titles of the original contents. Then 
there are pil-bags made up of thick textures and 
oil-skins, and these are used for the distribution 
of the oils of fish in the markets. The fish oils 
are preferred to the cocoanut oils for lighting 
purposes in many sections. The cocoanut oils are 
more costly. The fish oils are obtained in great 
quantities by many of the native gangs and in 
districts where the work is carried on the price 






prepare il 
na market*, where they 
liberai 

the n 

the rail to the markets oi the 

h with a bag or tube oi the oil. dc- 

the Chinese shack ind 

ig and measuring 

• thr oil. 

• of thr Americans and other foreign 
the islands are buying these oils tor investment. 
The) reship tlir oils almost immediately to some 

central point where is may he turned int< 
Traveltr. 






Oil and Gas in Kansas 
and Indian Territory 



RY ERASMUS IIUWIRTH. 

During the year 1904 oil and gas develop- 
ment in Kansas and the Indian Territory was 



mount Kansas prod 

; the Indian Territi 
mainder. The production, th n the 

10,000 
barrels per year, and bids tair to incn 
during the next two or three years. 

The areas most productive in Kansas are lo- 
cated principally in Allen. Neosho. Wilson, 
Montgomery and Chautauqua counties. Earlj 
in the year r In- r : ,! activity in the liol- 

ton Held near Independence, in Montgomery 
County. Also there was rapid development in 
all or the other counties named, particularly 
Chautauqua. B> the end of the year general ac- 
trvitj had checked to a considerable extent in all 
parts of Kansas except in Chautauqua County. 

The new outlying fields which were developed 
during the year within the State were two, one 
in the vicinity of Erie in Neosho county, and one 
in the vicinity of Paola, in .Miami county, fig- 
ures from neither one of which are included in 



■ 

b> maj he dry. 

the year in the vicinil 

I miles south 

or 12 miles from Ind,, 

In Chautauqua count] there seems ti 
well-defined pooh; the Spurlock-Blundel 
near the southern line ot the county, smith and 

a little west ot Peru; the Hoffman pool, from 

three to five miles south ot Sedan, and the pool 
immediately under the little town of Peru. The 
Spurlock-Blundel] ana had the greater develop- 
ment early in the year, and during the latter part 
the Hoffman field bei tune the most a, tivc. It bill; 

tair to develop into the best oil field yet opened 
up in the State. More than a hundred wells 
put down on town lots in Peru. They 
started with a CapacitJ ot from _'l > to 30 barrels 
per day, but are now almost exhausted. In the 
vicinirj of Humboldt and Chanute, oil is ob- 
tained at from 700 to 900 feel : in the Bolton- 
Wa\sidc area from 800 to 1000 Feet; al I 




Method of Pumping Wells in the Kern River Field. — -A Pumping Jack. 



unusually vigorous. At the beginning of the 
year there was a total of a little less than 1600 
wells producing oil within the entire area; at 
the close there was fully 4000. The total pro- 
duction of oil for the area by the month, and 
the daily average for each month, were as fol- 
lows: 

oil. PRODUCTION FOR KANSAS AND INDIAN 
TERRITORY FIELD, 1904. 

Total. Daily average. 

January 282,309 9.107 

February 313.556 10.S13 

March 338,274 10,912 

April 348,791 11,627 

May 383,514 12.371 

June 355,740 11,858 

July 508,996 16,516 

August 548,276 17,686 

September 531,611 17,720 

October 600,737 19.37S 



the total above given. Some oil developments 
began about Erie in 1903, but during the year 
1904 a good supply of oil was obtained from 
many different wells. This has scarcely been 
marketed at all, on account of a lack of facilities 
for transportation. Activity about Paola began 
in earnest in midsummer, 1904, and continued to 
the end of the year. Here a shallow oil sand is 
found at a depth of about 350 feet, which seems 
to be as productive as the average oil sand of 
Humboldt and Chanute. The Standard Oil 
Company has promised Paola a pipe-line. 

Oil development at Coffeyville began during 
1903 and continued throughout 1904. A fair 
amount of good oil was found in shallow sands 
from 350 to 500 feet deep. This territory seems 
to be very spotted, so much so that during the lat- 
ter part of the year prospecting, was not crowded 



ville oil thus far found is shallow, from 350 to 
Mill feet; at Tyro it is from 1050 to 1200 feet; 
at Caney, near 1400 feet; in the Spurlock-Blun- 
del 1 pool, oil is usually found at 1100 to 1150 
feet, and in the Hoffman pool at about 1200 to 
1300 feet deep. 

Throughout more than half the year develop- 
ment in the Indian Territory was confined prin- 
cipally to the lands belonging to the Osage In- 
dians, on account of difficulties in the way of ob- 
taining leases elsewhere. The Indian Territory 
Illuminating Oil Company has a blanket lease 
on the entire Osage lands and sub-leases to actual 
operators. Development was confined princi- 
pally to the extreme eastern portion of the Osage 
lands until near the close of the year. In Sep- 
tember a good oil well was brought in at Cleve- 
land, in (Oklahoma Territory, just across the Ar- 



PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 



kansas river from the Osage lands. This resulted 
in a great rush to all lands adjacent, both in 
Cleveland on the south and in the Osage nation 
on the north, and at present manv drills are in 
operation on both sides of the river. It is re- 
ported that leases there are higher than any- 
where else, excepting immediately adjacent Bar- 
tlesville. Development was also carried on 
throughout the year in the vicinity of Musko- 
gee, Chelsea, Tulsa, Red Fork and Bartlesville. 
Later in the year the Secretary of the Interior 
began confirming leases within the Cherokee ter- 
ritory, and immediately drilling began with great 
activity, so that at the present time derricks 
are being erected and drills are in operation in 
many places. A few small areas were leased 
previously, notably, section 12, including nearly 
all the town-site of Bartlesville, which was leased 
to the Cudahy Companv; and an area of 12 sec- 
tions near Chelsea leased to the Cherokee Oil & 
Gas Company. A part of the townsite of Bartles- 
ville was deeded outright, so that the owners can 
lease or drill at their pleasure. Since Cherokee 
leases have been confirmed, drilling has become 



tories at Iola, and zinc smelters at Neodesha, 
Cherryvale and Caney, the enormous brick-yards 
here and there all through the gas area, and the 
gas factories at Coffeyville, Independence and 
Caney. Already the original gas field at Iola is 
beginning to weaken, but a new field was de- 
veloped late in the year, lying to the north of 
the old, which has gas sufficient to keep Iola 
going for an indefinite period. To the south the 
largest gas fields are in the vicinity of Cherryvale, 
Neodesha, Coffeyville, Independence, Caney, and 
in the Indian Territory at Bartlesville and Oche- 
lata. In Chautauqua county there are two prin- 
cipal gas-fields, one to the south of Peru and the 
other adjoining the Hoffman oil-field on the east. 
The most remarkable gas yet discovered in the 
State was developed during the year from four 
to seven miles south of Independence. Here are 
a number of wells with a flowing capacity of 
more than 20,000,000 cubic feet per day each ; 
one of these is reported to have been bought re- 
cently after careful measurement, on a basis of 
a daily capacity of 33,000,000 cubic feet. It is 
hardly probable, however, that the wells are 




Two Gushers of La Graciosa Oil Co., Santa Maria. 



very active in the vicinity of the little town of 
Alluwe, about 30 miles south of Coffeyville, and 
also at the villages of Dewey and Lenapah, the 
former being four miles north of Bartlesville, and 
the latter ten miles south of Coffeyville. At the 
close of November Chelsea had about 96 pro- 
ducing wells, Red Fork 50, Cleveland 10, Mus- 
kogee 35 or more, Bartlesville nearly 200, and 
other points within the Osage territory 75 or 80 
more. 

At Chelsea and Alluwe the wells are from 300 
to 600 feet in depth ; at Red Fork and Tulsa, 
from 700 to 1000 feet; at Muskogee 1000 to 
1200 feet; at Bartlesville about 1100 to 1400, 
and at Cleveland 1600 or 1700 feet, the deepest of 
any in the entire Kansas-Indian Territory field. 

Kansas and the Indian Territory today prob- 
ably have a greater production of gas than any 
other equal era in the world. Gas has been in 
use in a dozen or more towns within the State 
for twelve or fifteen years, during which time 
an enormous amount of it has been consumed. 
The largest factories which are great consumers 
are zinc smelters and the Portland cement fac- 



quite as strong as popularly reported. It is said 
that while this well stood wide open with gas is- 
suing out of a 6 1-4 inch pipe, the flow exerted 
a pressure on the mouth of the closed tube equal 
to 35 pounds per square inch. Robinson's tables 
include estimates for no pipe larger than 6 inch. 
But after making corrections for position of 
mouth of closed pipe, a flow of 35 pounds pres- 
sure is equal to about 31,000,000 cubic feet daily 
capacity by the tables. 

Early in the year a well was drilled at Ca- 
ney, which found a body of gas at a depth of 
about 1600 feet. This gives a static pressure of 
more than 600 pounds, and a flowage of 21,000,- 
000 cubic feet. Very recently some strong wells 
have been brought in at Bartlesville and further 
south in the vicinity of Ochelata. 

Recently there is great agitation about piping 
gas outside the State. Already a pipe-line is 
nearly completed to carry gas to Joplin and other 
points in the zinc-fields, and it is reported a right 
of way has been secured for a pipe-line to Kan- 
sas City. In the meantime local citizens are do- 
ing everything they can to prevent gas being 



piped out, resorting to legal obstructions wher- 
ever possible, and even to more severe measures. 
What the final outcome will be cannot now be 
told, but probably resistance will be futile and the 
gas will be piped out. 

With the exception of Muskogee, throughout 
this entire area, oil and gas are obtained from 
sandstones lying within the Lower Coal Meas- 
ures. Muskogee has a productive sand lying some 
600 or 800 feet below the base of the Coal Meas- 
ures. Its exact geological properties are not yet 
determined, but provisionally it may be classified 
as Lower Silurian. 



Mineral Resources of the 
United States, 1903 



For the twentieth time the Unitel States Geo- 
logical Survey has issued its annual report on the 
mineral resources of the country. The volume 
containing the statistics for the calendar year 
1903 is now available. Besides statistics, consid- 
erable descriptive and technical matter, obtained 
while the statistical canvass was in progress, is 
presented. As heretofore, the publication of this 
volume has been anticipated to a great extent by 
the issue in advance, in pamphlet fom, of the 
several chapters which comprise it. 

In 1903, for the fourth time, the total value 
of our mineral production exceeded the enormous 
sum of $1,000,000,000. The exact figures for 
1903 were $1,419,721,569, as compared with $1,- 
260,509,738 in 1902, a gain of 12.63 per cent. 

As in previous years, iron and coal are the most 
important of our mineral products. The value 
of the iron in 1903 was $344,350,000; the value 
of the coal, $503,724,381. The fuels increased 
from $469,078,842 in 1902 to $634,233,791 in 
1903, a gain of $165,154,949, or 35 per cent. 
Every variety of fuel increased in value. . Anthra- 
cite coal showed an increase in value from $76,- 
173,586 in 1902 to $152,036,448 in 1903. The 
average price of anthracite coal per long ton at 
the mine was $2,50, as against $2.35 in 1902, the 
highest figure obtained up to that time since 1888, 
as compared with $2.05 in 1901, with $1.85 in 
1900, and with $1.80 in 1899. The average 
price per short ton for bituminous coal at the 
mine was $1.24, as compared with $1.12 in 1902. 
The increase in value of the bituminous coal out- 
put over 1902 was $60,829,450, a combined in- 
crease in value of coal of $136,692,312 over 1902. 

The gain of $159,211,831 in the total value of 
our mineral production is due to the large in- 
crease in non-metallic products,, the metallic pro- 
ducts showing a decrease from $642,258,584 in 
1902 to $624,318,008 in 1903, a loss of $17,940,- 
576, and the non-metallic products showing an 
increase from $617,251,154 in 1 902 to $794,403,- 
561 in 1903, a gain of $177,152,407. To these 
products should be added estimated unspecified 
products, including building, molding, and other 
sands reported to this office, the rare mineral 
molybdenum, and other mineral products, valued 
at $1,000,000, making the total mineral produc- 
tion for 1903, $1,419,721,569. 



SEALED PROPOSALS. 



Sealed proposals, in triplicate, will be received 
at the office of the Isthmian Canal Commission, 
Washington, D. C, until 10:30 o'clock a. m., on 
the 7th day of February, 1905, at which time they 
will be opened in public, for furnishing the arti- 
cles as hereafter specified, viz: "Machine Tools, 
Machinery, Hand Cars, Leather Belting, Rope, 
Canvas and Rubber Hose, Cars, and Miscella- 
neous Supplies, Including Coal Tar, Axle Grease, 
Glue, Ticking, Horse Hair, Etc." Schedules and 
specification blanks will be furnished on appli- 
cation to the above named department. 

J. G. Walker, 
Chairman Isthmian Canal Commission. 



PACIFIC i »l 



THE SOUTHERN FIELDS 



COALINGA 



The situation in thr local Ur. 
can be. There is m> drilling at all being done 
in the city field proper. In -.mr sections the 
:i down and the wells abandoned, 
and the land laid out into building lots, 
being a question ot probably a year or two 
when most ot these old wells will be "off the 
markc- eak. The attempt here to form 

an independent organization similar to that in 
the Kern County fields is making little headway. 
Then- inj Small producers and the con- 

ditions under which the> operate, mi apparently 
diversified, that it is a difficult matter to get them 
together. Officers have been elected, however, 
and the work oi securing sigatures to the 
ment among oil men is progressing slowly. Some 
such plan as that under way is probably the only 
hope of any immediate relief in the way of better 
and it is believed success will crown the 
efforts of the promoters of the enterprise. 

1 he Western field continues to show- consider- 
able activity, and while some have discontinued 
drilling for the present, the Amalgamated seems 
to be crowding things. This concern has four 
strings of tools at work now on new wells and 
is at present building three new rigs. 

P. F. Schomachcr has commenced work on a 
new well in this district and it is said he intends 
to drill several more before suspending new work. 

Clark and Sherman and A. F. Gilmon have 
both stopped drilling for the present. Mr. Gil- 
mon's last well is still flowing about 250 or 300 
barrels daily. 

Thomas Joyce, who was drilling a well about 
one-half mile south of the Amalgamated property, 
has suspended work. It is not likely that work 
will be resumed here, on account of a heavy flow 
of water which was encountered at about 1500 
feet. 

FULLERTON. 

Conditions here are the same as in other south- 
ern fields. At Brea Canyon there is no drilling 
being done at all, and only about half the produc- 
ing wells are being pumped. The Menges Oil 
Co. has completed its No. 2, which will make 
a fair producer, and no more will be drilled until 
the market improves. 

The Columbia Oil Co. is drilling one well 
and when it is completed will probably drill a 
deep hole adjoining the property of the Fullerton 
Consolidated, which recently brought in an im- 
mense well. The Columbia will certainly get a 
fine well here, as the Santa Fe, whose property 
also converges at this point with the others, has 
a well three years old which is yet doing about 
400 barrels daily. 

Graham and Loftus have just begun work on 
a new well near its southern line. This com- 
pany runs two strings of tools constantly. 

The Santa Fe continues with eight strings of 
tools on its property in this field, and is increas- 
ing its production as rapidly as possible, because 
it needs the oil. Its Kern River production has 
shrunk to such a degree that it is necessary to in- 
crease it at Fullerton, to keep up the supply. 

The Puente Oil Co. is running two strings 
of tools on its Fullerton property and has 
stopped new work on its Puente property. This 
company uses all its own product at its refinery 
at Chino. The oil obtained here is of a high 
quality and valuable for refining. This company 
sells gasoline, kerosene and distillale all over 
southern California and comes in direct competi- 
tion with the Standard. The result of the fight 
that is now on will be watched with interest. 

The Iowa Oil Co., operating about one and 
one-half miles southeast of the present developed 
field, is still at work, with "good prospects of suc- 
cess. The hole is now about 2000 feet deep and 
there is a good showing of oil. 



Thr Coalinga-Peerless pro| r.- n tlv 

much better than was promised b) the company. 
It* well No. I began with a production o( I sit 
barrels per da\ and increased to more than 500 
barreU: its No, 2, where the top water caused so 
much trouble, has been cured and is now a good 
produc No i has iust starte.l pumping at 

barrel rate with a promise "t a verj con- 
siderable increase; it* No. 4 lacks about 300 feet 
of completion: its No. 5, just completed, is about 

to st.irt pumping and gives promise oi producing 
much more heavt'lj than even No. 3. 

It is authentically reported that Frank A. 
ii. J. W. Pauson and Captain Turner have 
acquired the Wabash and Twentj Six Oil Com- 
panies' properties in the Coalinga district. It is 
well known that the Arline and Tavern com- 

panies have been bought up by the same inter- 
ests which, together with the Independence I )il 

Company, which they also control, makes them 
aire ng the largest producers in the field. Inquiry 



I 

river. 

i and the oil field 

dj to the 
financial aid, and the hous 

*.\\i\\ to the work ol the M ' church is, 

1 am informed, entirelj clear of debt. 

Rev. K. K. I i ties. M. 1 ).. 
Saturday from I 

Coalin Sunday, returning home on Mon- 
day. .Mr. Eccles is not now on active pastoral 
ilutv. but is taking a little rest alter twenty years 
of preaching and practicing medicine to those 
who were in need. While visiting his brother, P. 
les, oi l.'H ■. well known to many I lan- 
ford people, the Kiv. Eccles saw this great need 
nt some one to tell the "old, old story" in the oil 
town ol the West Side, and took up the good 
work. 

A parsonage is badly needed, we understand, 
in aid the good work in connection with the 
Coalinga church, and we understand that an ap- 
peal will be made to the people of Kings county, 
and when the subscription paper is circulated the 
people can take our word for it that it is needed 




Well of Radium Oil Co., Santa Maria, now drilling. 



at the office of the Independence Oil Company, 
600 Parrott building, leads to the confirmation 
of the above facts. The officials say that it is 
not intended to amalgamate the corporations on 
account of outstanding stock. This may, how- 
ever, be done at a later date. It is intended to 
do considerable development on all of the prop- 
erties in the near future. 

The following is from the pen of F. V. 
Dewey, a staff reporter of the Hanford Journal: 

In my trips to Coalinga I have observed the 
building which has been erected there for church 
purposes. It was one of the first evidences I 
saw of the fact that Coalinga will eventually quit 
being "wild and woolly" and will become as 
peaceable as any other town in the great San 
Joaquin valley. 

Coalinga was a long time getting a church, but 
when it did acquire one it was one that was 
very neat, up to date, and that will accommo- 
date the congregation which assembles there for 
several years to come. Much earnest work was 
done by a few Christian men and women of 



and that the money will be used to good purpose 
in forwarding the extension of the first church 
in Coalinga. There are 1500 people in the oil 
field of Coalinga, and this is the only house of 
worship there. Surely the little new church in 
the oil town has an abundance of work before it 
and one which everyone can give a mite to aid. 



KERN 



The plan of the Standard Oil Company for 
pumping Coalinga oil through the big pipe line 
to Kern river, which was "exclusively' reported 
in the Echo some months ago, is now being put 
into effect for the first time. Yesterday noon the 
oil was reported at Kimberlina and it was ex- 
pected at the station in the Kern river field this 
morning at 2 o'clock. 

Several months ago, when it was learned that 
the Standard was emptying some of its steel tanks 
in the Kern river field the Echo ascertained that 
the purpose in doing so was to make room for 
Coalinga oil in case the company decided to 



PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 



FRESNO COUNTY ABSTRACT COMPANY 

Incorporated Under the Laws of California January 21, 1901. 

Capital Stock $100,000.00 

FULLY PAID UP 

SEARCHERS OF RE CORDS AND CONVEYANCE 

Abstracts of Title Carefully Compiled at Reasonable Rates. 

NO. 1115 K ST., FRESNO, CAL. 

SMITH, EMERY ®. CO. 

Chemical Engineers 

ANALYSES 

PETROLEUM — Calorific Value, 
Fractional Distillation, Refining, Vis= 
cosity, Freezing, Candle Power, Burn= 
ing. Tests, Etc. Boiler Feed & Drink- 
ing Water. Umpire Work on Oil Contracts. 

83-85 New Montgomery Street 

SAM P1JANCISCO 

CLOT & CRIST MACHINE CO. 

Designers and Builders of Special and Labor=Saving Machinery 

Estimates Furnished on Power and Pumping Plants Complete 

Special Attention Paid to the Repairing oJ Steam Pumps and Other- Machinery 

I THE BEST PUMP ON EARTH 





For Water Works and Mining Purposes 
For Oil Pipe Lines and Oil Burning Plants 

Artesian Deep Well and Sinking Pumps 

Electric Driven Pumps of Every Kind 
AGENTS FOR 

3= Horse Power Stickney Gasoline Engine 

Telephone John 596 

137=139 Beale Street, San Francisco 




R. P. WADDELL 

GENERAL AGENT FOR 

X=Ray and Dandy Windmills 

PUMPS, PIPING, TANKS, FRAMES, 

GALVANIZED STEEL AND WOOD TOWERS 

Aermotor Mills and Repairs 

ESTIMATES ON 1RR1GAT ING OUTFITS 

35 Beale St., San Francisco 

Branch Office: 353 11th St.. Oakland, Cal. 

H. B. GUTHREY 

Oil Well Contractor 

Specifications furnished on wells of any depth 
=^=^=^^ in any country ^^^z^^=^= 

WATER SHUT OFF IN OIL WELLS 

Many valuable oil properties in this state saved by our process 
which is sure and permanent 

Our references are our past customers 

H. B. GUTHREY, 

COALINGA, CAL. 




purr.p it to Kern river for storage. It was ex- 
plained at that time that the Coalinga oil, being 
of lighter gravity than the Kern river product, 
it wastes very much faster when it is stored in 
earthen reservoirs. The plan was therefore 
formed of transferring the Kern river oil from 
the steel tanks to earthen reservoirs and using 
the steel tanks for storing the Coalinga oil. 

It is report-ed'now that the Coalinga oil, which 
is being pumped here, will be mixed with the 
Kern river product and then pumped to Point 
Richmond. The mixture of the Coalinga oil with 
the Kern river oil would lighten the latter so 
that it could be pumped much more expeditiously 
than when in its natural state. — Echo, Jan.. 15. 

The Echo has received several complaints lately 
from promoters of oil companies that its articles 
concerning the price of fuel oil and the oil situ- 
ation have interfered with deals by which the 
complainants had expected to realize various 
amounts running into thousands of dollars. It 
is always a disagreeable thing for a newspaper to 
say anything that will tend to discourage an 
investor from putting his money into a local en- 
terprise, and our first impulse is always to talk 
hopefully of any project which involves the pay- 
ment of commissions to local people or the spend- 
ing of money in the town. Looking at the mat- 
ter from a broader point of view, however, there 
are few things more hurtful to a community in 
the long run than enterprises that are started 
hopefully and then fail, and there is no more vig- 
orous and successful knocker than the man who 
invests his money in a place and fails to get the 
returns he was led to expect. 

In the case of the oil business we are of the 
opinion that for the present it is overdone, and 
for new capital to be invested in the production 
of oil will not only be bad f,or the new investor 
but it will be bad for those who are already in 
the business. 

In accepting the situation as we see it we are 
not sounding any lugubrious note. Oil is going 
to be cheap for some time to come, but .if this 
fact is generally recognized and the work of de- 
veloping new territory is restricted accordingly 
we do not think that the price will fall below the 
cost of production and in a reasonable time we 
expect to see it recover so that it will yield the 
producer a fair return on his investment. 

And so far as the community's interest are 
concerned the fact that we are to have an abund- 
ance of cheap fuel here for years to come is cer- 
tainly no cause for despondency. We recommend 
that some of our friends who are disappointed in 
their plans for promoting oil companies by the 
present tendency of the market turn their at- 
tention to promoting enterprises which will con- 
sume and not produce oil, and to which the pres- 
ence of great qualities of the raw material will 
therefore be an inducement instead of an obstacle. 
— Echo, Jan. 15th. 

The Adeline Company has made a contract 
of some magnitude for delivering oil from its 
lease at Sunset, and it is now installing a Grind- 
rod pump, with which five cars can be loaded at 
one time. 

A sidetrack is being built and of such length 
as to accommodate five cars, and .the work of 
loading and shipping will be begun just as soon 
as this track is completed. 

The Adeline's well No. 3 continues to flow 
uninterruptedly. It has filled the 11,000 barrel 
reservoir and the oil is now running over the em- 
bankment. 

Teams are at work now building a reservoir of 
35,000 barrels, and the company has a rig in 
place for drilling a fourth well. 



PACIFIC OI 






Government Report of 
California Oil Oper- 
ations in 1903 



In "Production ol Petroleum in 1903," the 

led the 
following report ol operai fomia dur- 

C \t IKuRN I \. 

The most important event connected with the 

output of petroleum in the United States in 1903 

ie remarkable Increase in the production ol 

•rnia anil its sudden elevation to head of 

itcs producing petroleum, superseding Ohio, 

which for several rears previous ranked lirst. 

When values are compared, however, California's 
rank is sixth, heing slightly less than that of 
Texas. During 1903 the State produced 24.27 
per cent of the production and 7.81 per cent of 
tlu- value of the petroleum produced in the United 
. The total State production was 24,382,- 
+72 barrels in 1903, an increase of 10,398,204 
barrels, or 74. Mi per cent over that of 1902. The 
value of the petroleum produced was $7,399,439, 
an average of 30.3 cents per barrel, as compared 
with 34.8 cents per barrel in 1902. 

The greater portion of the increase in 1903 
came from Kern County, which, almost doubling 
:ts former large output, produced over 74 per cent 
of the total. The largest percentage of gain was 
in Fresno County, which increased 374 per cent 
over the production of 1902. The average price 
paid for the petroleum produced in Kern County 
in 1903 was 21 cents per barrel, and 33 cents 
for that produced in Fresno County. The high- 
est price paid was for a limited production from 
Santa Clara County, valued at Jl^l 1 ^ per 
barrel. 

FIELD OPERATIONS. 

There was a total of about 480 wells completed 
uuring 1903, of which number about 125 were 
dry holes. Of the sixteen counties in this State 
in which wells were drilled by far the greatest 
number were drilled in Kern County. So far 
profitable developments have been confined almost 
entirely to the Coast range, on the western side, 
and to the southern end of the great central San 
Joaquin Valley. 

Operations were conducted in the counties of 
Kern, Fresno, Los Angeles, Orange, Ventura, 
Santa Barbara, Santa Clara, San Mateo, Mont- 
erey, Kings. Madera, Contra Costa, Colusa, San 
Bernardino, and Humboldt counties. No new 
pools were opened, most of the operations for the 
year being confined to known localities as the 
increased facilities of transportation enabled much 
new work to be prosecuted. 

KERN COUNTY. 

The Bakersfield, McKittrick, and Sunset fields, 
located in this county, were the scene of much 
active work during 1903, which resulted in the 
production of 18,077,900 barrels. The loose sand 
in which the deposit is found in this field is re- 
markably regular and often of great thickness, 
and the wells are also remarkably regular in their 
output, and range from 900 to 1000 feet in depth. 
There must be considerable gas pressure to cause 
so heavy an oil as is found to flow naturally. The 
Bakersfield pool is by far the most important, and 
there is good reason to infer that this pool will 
continue to produce still greater quantities of this 
quality of petroleum in the future. The southern 
terminus of the pipe line leading to Port Rich- 
mond is located at this field, and there is an im- 
mense quantity of petroleum, amounting to .3,- 



WESTERN COOPERAGE CO. 

MANl l-AC 1 1 in 

STAVES and HEADING 

For Bolh Tlfthi and si,.!, Work. 
OUR SPECIALTIES ARE 

White Spruce Sates and Heading Fir Tight Barrel Slates and 

all ready to set up lor Fish, Heading lor Oil. Lard, Pork, 

Pickles or Lard packages ol Bee) t(c ^ 

any sue. ooo 

Fir Slack Barrel Staves and Heading for Asphalt, Lime 
Cement and Bottle Barrels. 

Prompt and Courteous Jittentlon to all Inquiries. 

MILLS at Aberdeen, Wash, and Houlton, Ore. 



Arlim 

1 on the 24th d 
menl No, 
was lc\ ied upon the capita 
ration, payable i 

the office "f the Conij 

Buildinp San Francisco. Am stock upon which 
this assessment shall remain unpaid on sail 
day of February, 1905, "ill In- delinquent ami 
advertised for sale at public auction, and. i 
payment is made before, will be sold on the 
day of February the delinquent 

her with . i rising and 

expenses of the sale. J, W. Pai 

tary. 
Room 500 I'.' rig, S. I''., Cal. 



Lacy Manufacturing Company 



Manufacturers of 




Steel Water Pipe 
General Sheet 
Iron Works 
Oil Well Casing 
Oil Stills 

OIL STORAGE AND WAGON TANKS 

Works: Cor. New Main and Date streets, P. O. Box 231. Station C 

Baker Block Telephone MMn 196 

Office, 334 North Main Street. Los Angeles, Cal- 

BATES' 

PATENT CASING TONGS 




1416-1426 19th St.. Bakersfield, Cal. 



Fills a long-felt want. No more need of 
pole and rope for screwing up casing Bates 
Tongs can be applied to the casing anywhere 
in driving or pulling without danger of injury 
or parting casing. 

Set No. 1, with any two size jaws from gVn 
to 13^ Inches. 

Set No. 2, with any two size jaws fro-n 4 to 
9$^ Inches. 




PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 




Bullfrog Extension Mining 
Company 



We have had greater sales on this stock than anything we have ever handled. Bullfrog is 
a wonderful camp ; every mining man that has come from there states that it is bound to be greater 
than the phenomenal camps of Tonopah and Goldfield. Such camps as Bullfrog are found about 
once in a lifetime. 

Our prospectus and market letter is now ready and will be mailed on request. Big advance 

in price of shares at an early date. Small amount le'ft at 20 cents. Wire the shares you want 
reserved. 

DEBENTURE SURETY COMPANY (Inc.), 
Use the Wires. It Pays. Rialto Bldg., A 10, San Francisco, Cal. 

BUY A BARLOW & HILL MAP 

OF THE OIL FIELDS 
Large Blue Prints, .■;.... . $1.50 
Large Blue Prints on Linen, . . . . 3.00 
Book of Indexed Maps, 50 

SPECIAL MAPS MADE TO ORDER 

Prices on Application 

6>6e Pacific Oil Reporter 



318 PINE STREET 



SAN FRANCISCO 



DIRECTORS. 
M. Grosstnayer. 
S. Fleisher. 
J. B. Bonetti. 
T. R. Finley. 
S. A. Johnson. 
C. F. Bramming. 
James Smith. 



OFFICERS. 
M. Grosstnayer, Pres. 
S. Fleisher, Vice Pres. 
J. B. Bonetti, Treas. 
T. R. Finley, Sec'y. 
S. A. Johnson, Gen. Mgr. 



Barca Oil Company 



CAPITALIZATION, $500,000; PAR VALUE STOCK, $1.00 PER SHARE. 



The property of this Company consists of 250 acres of land, situated one-half mile north of 
the famous Purissima well of the Union Oil Company, which has been flowing 500 barrels of oil 
daily for the past year, and it is directly in line between that well and the same company's 
famous 12,000-barrel gusher on the Hartnell Tract. 

We are offering enough stock in our Company at 25 cents per share to drill our first well, 
and at this price the stock is the best and safest investment so far offered in the Santa Maria Dis- 
trict, and a sure money-maker for those who invest. 

Our well No. 1 is now drilling and will be pushed to completion as rapidly as possible. 

For further information address 

BARCA OIL COMPANY, 

SANTA MARIA, CAL. 



500,000 barrels, stored in iron tanks in this 
vicinity. 

FRESNO COUNTY. 

The production in this county, so far, -comes 
from what is known as the Coalinga field, in the 
southern portion of the county. Recently there 
was an extension of the field to the southwest. 
There was a, remarkable increase in the produc- 
tion secured in this pool during 1903, which 
amounted to 1,560,129 barrels, or 374 per cent 
over that of 1902. 

There are a number of grades of petroleum pro- 
duced in this field, which range from 11 degrees 
and 45 degrees Baume. The greater portion has 
a gravity of about 33 degrees Baume, but strange 
as it may seem the lighter grades are nearest the 
surface. Since 1897 this field has had from five 
to seven miles of pipe line in operation to receiv- 
ing tanks on the Southern Pacific Railway, near 
Coalinga. The Pacific Coast Oil Company has 
connected the Coalinga field with Mendota Sta- 
tion by thirty-one miles of pipe line. This sta- 
tion is on the main line from Bakersfield to Point 
Richmond, and 166 miles south of the last-named 
locality. One of the serious drawbacks at Coal- 
inga is the scarcity of water, which is supplied to 
the drilling and pumping wells by a pipe line 
from wells several miles distant. 

LOS ANGELES COUNTY. 

The Los Angeles pool was quite active during 
1903, and increased its production by the careful 
working of the original wells from 1,938,114 bar- 
rels in 1902 to 2,087,627 barrels in 1903. There 
was an average of 1150 producing wells pumped 
during the year. Nearly the entire production 
was marketed as fuel petroleum. The Whittier 
pool in the southeastern portion of this county 
reaches over into Orange County, and is known 
as the Fullerton pool. There are a number of 
deep wells in this pool that produce a large quan- 
tity of superior petroleum susceptible of refining 
in a profitable way. Other wells toward Brea 
Canyon produce large quantities of dark and 
heavy fuel petroleum. 

At Newhall nothing new was devoleped during 
1903. The older wells have been operated regu- 
larly and a few new producers added inside of 
the developed territory. In this pool a very light 
variety of petroleum was found several years pre- 
vious which was almost- colorless and had a specific 
gravity of 50 degrees Baume. 

SANTA BARBARA COUNTY. . 

In Santa Barbara County the Union and 
the Pinal Oil companies each secured a large 
flowing well during 1903, with indications of the 
existence of a large petroleum deposit at both 
localities. 

Ventura and San Mateo counties had some 
slight fluctuations in their production. There is 
a slight production for the first time recorded for 
Santa Clara County. 

TRANSPORTATION. 

One of the most important events of the year 
bearing upon the petroleum industry in California 
was the successful operating of the pipe line built 
by the Pacific Coast Oil Companj' and extending 
from Bakersfield to Point Richmond, a distance 
of 278 miles, with a branch line of thirty-one 
miles from Mendota to Coalinga. 

The successful handling of petroleum produced 
in Kern County, the southern terminal, with a 
gravity averaging 15 1-2 degrees Baume, was an 
entirely new departure in the transporting of 
liquids in pipes. This was brought about princi- 
pally by the heating of the fluid by the exhaust 
steam and the covering of the line with a non- 
conductor; it was assisted also somewhat by the 
admixture of the lighter crudes developed at 



PACIFIC OIL RE PORTER 



.nd in some instances by using a per- 
centage of water. 

The pipe line is now delivering Iron 
rrels per day. 

UtFIMl K 

There are about forty retincries in C;i]!iornia, 
although many of theni can hardly be classed as 
such, xs they are designed more particularly to 
reduce the asphalt to a more compact form suit- 
able for roadways. This is done In crudely dis- 
tilling the heavier natural petroleum, from which 
35 to 4^ per cent of solid asphalt is secured. B\ 
far the most important relinery in the State was 
in process of erection during 1903 at Point Rich- 
mond, on the waters of San Francisco Bay, COT 
nectcd by rail with the Santa Fe Railroad. This 
relinery is one ot the largest, and is destined to 
li:i\ '■ a most important influence by refining the 
crude petroleum of California for distribution 
on the Pacific Coast, and to the Hawaiian Islands, 
Japan, China, and India by tank steamers as a 
grade of petroleum that can be sold at reduced 
rates to the great masses of humanity who inhabit 
those portions of the globe. A large proportion 
of California petroleum must continue to be dis- 
posed of as fuel. 

PETROLEUM FUEL. 

The successful introduction of petroleum fuel 
on the Pacific Coast has caused the rapid decline 
in the importation of coal. The problem of cheap 
fuel has been solved. The railroads, the manu- 
facturers, and the steamship lines are being direct- 
ly benefited by its general introduction as an eco- 
nomical and perfect fuel. 

Petroleum that is to be consumed inside of 
buildings or in steam vessels should not contain 
any of the lighter products, which are in many 
cases found even in the heavier crude. It should 
have a fire test ranging from 220 degrees to 270 
degrees Fahrenheit. Under these conditions it is 
safe to handle and there is no loss from evapora- 
tion. 

Numerous tests have shown that where the pet- 
roleum fuel is sold by measure the heavier grades 
have as high an evaporative test as the lighter 
ones; when sold by weight the lighter crudes 
usually have a higher evaporative value. 

The important condition necessary is good com- 
bustion, and to insure that the liquid fuel should 
be completely atomized by a steam jet or by com- 
pressed air. The latter is preferable, especially 
when super-heated, because it more easily pro- 
duces complete combustion and does not carry off 
so large a quantity of heat. To insure satisfac- 
tory results it is also necessary in all cases to have 
the jet of liquid fuel spray upon hot fire bricks and 
not come in direct contact with the plates of the 
boiler until the combustion has been completed. 

The best results have been secured by building 
an arch of fire brick over the grate bars, the crown 
of which comes within five or six inches of the 
bottom of the boiler and is parallel to it. About 
every fourth brick in this arch should be left out 
for openings through which the products of com- 
bustion may escape. Inside of this arch a loose 
checkerwork of fire brick should be placed, upon 
which the petroleum should spray, only the neces- 
sary air being admitted through the openings of 
the grate bars. This can easily be regulated by 
the arrangement of the fire brick upon the bars. 

In like manner the fire boxes of locomotives 
which use petroleum for fuel must be arched with 
fire brick above where the spray strikes the back 
of the box, which must also be protected by fire 
brick, and an inverted arch of the same material 
should extend down into the ash pan, with open 
spaces in the brickwork and an open space at the 
front end of the admission of the air. 



On January 20th the Debenture Surety Com- 
pany paid its regular monthly dividend (No. 21) 
of five cents per share. 



Flow of Natural Gas 
Increased by . . . 

Cooper's Gas Lift 

Also flow of water 
or oil Increased and 
gas saved 

A. S. COOPER, C.E., 

219 Crocker Building 
San Francisco, Cal. 



ALEXANDER & CHURCH 

Attorneys and Counselors at Law 



Will draw legal Instruments of 
all kinds, practice In all courts, 
organize corporations, and attend, 
In general, to other law business 
for corporations and others. 



Office, 404 Croseley Building 



SAN FRANCISCO 

Telephone Main 587 



..OIL TANKS.. 

Oil Stills, Car Tanks, Riveted Pipe, Storage Tanks of 
every capacity and every description. Write for Estimates 

WM. GRAVER TANK WORKS 

77 Jackson Boulevard - CHICAGO, ILL. 

North Machine Co. 

JOHN G. NORTH, President and Manager 

Machinists and Engineers 

115=117 Beale St., San Francisco, California 



\\fE make a specialty of Oil Well Tools and are always 
ready to quote prices on Fishing Tools, Hand Tools, Etc. 

WRITE US TO-DAY ! 
If you want to invest your money in a sound business proposition where you are sure 
to receive ten dollars for every one dollar invested 

BUY BUFFALO-CALIFORNIA OIL STOCK. 
This company is incorporated under a special act of Congress providing for the incor- 
poration of companies in the District of Columbia, making our stock absolutely non-assessable 
We hold some of the most valuable oil property in the well known 

HALFMOON BAY DISTRICT, 
San Mateo County, California, 
Now possessing many fine oil wells producing 52° to 55° gravity oil. But we cannot tell it all 
here. Write us for full particulars. 

Correspondence with reliable brokers and agents solicited. 

BUFFALO-CALIFORNIA OIL CO., 
Fletcher Block, 
Livermore, California. 

C. V. Hall Iron Works 

Los Angeles Office, 222 Wilcox Buildng, LOS 'NGELES, CAL. 

All kinds of Oil Well Tools. 
Very Best Materials 

Fishing Tools and Heavy Forging and 
Machine Work 

ASK YOUR SUPPLY HOUSE FOR 

C. V. H. TOOLS 

The C V. H. Chain Tongs can be had through 
any dealer In oil well supplies. 

Jfddress 

CHARLES VICTOR HALL 

222 Wilcox Building, Los Angeles, California 




12 



PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 



ADOLPH L. STONE 

Crude Oil and Asphalt Broker 

Contracts for Crude Oil in the Santa Maria, Kern River and Coalinga Districts 
California Asphalt Shipments arranged for all parts of the world 

All grades Asphalt for Street Paving, Roofing, Varnish Manufacturers, Etc. Samples on application 

Office, 137 Montgomery Street ... €*—«» ir«on>~;o»r> ^«»1 

Mail Address, P 0. Box 2520 - - - <»»«* t raiiClSCO, C^al. 



We manufacture the best 
lubricating oils for oil 
drillers 

KING KEYSTONE OIL CO., 
204 Front St., San Francisco. 



FOR SALE. 



1000 shares Pinal Oil stock at $3.60 per share. 

3000 shares Brookshire Oil stock at $1.00 per 
share. 

W. E. BARNARD, 
476 Tenth Street, Oakland, California. 




HE 

KROHN 
WIRE ROPE SOCKET 

THE ONLY SOCKET USINfi A BALL CLUTCH 



LASTING QUALITIES UNEQUALLED 



PATENT 



CLUTCH 




DEVICE 




For Sale by ALL 

OIL WELL SUPPLY HOUSES 



LLEWELLYN IRON WORKS 

SOLE MANUFACTURERS 

LOS ANGELES, CAL. 

Write for Circular 




CALIFORNIA STOCK AND OIL EX- 
CHANGE. 



The following are stock sales in the Califor- 
nia Stock and Oil Exchange in the formal sessions 
held for the week ending Wednesday, Janu- 
ary 18: 
Associated Bonds — 

17,000 bonds at 86.00 

4,000 bonds at 86.25 

5,000 bonds at 86.50 

Associated Stock — 

1,250 shares at 

300 shares at 

5,000 shares at 

48,000 shares at -. 

Caribou — 

125 shares at 7 . 75 

Four Oil — 



.27 
.28 
.29 
.30 



1,000 shares at 
Forty Oil — 

3,200 shares at 
600 shares at 
1,000 shares at 
2,000 shares at . 
Home Oil — 
2,400 shares at 
1 ,200 shares at 
1,500 shares at 
Independence — 

827 shares at . 
Monte Crista — 
1O0 shares at . 



.56 

..48 
.45 
.50 
.55 

.45 
.46 
.48 

.28 

.75 



200 shares at 77^ 

Occidental Oil — 

900 shares at 07 

Pittsburg — 

1,000 shares at 13 

Twenty-Eight — 

100 shares at ■ 12.00 



Following are the latest 
of oil companies listed on 
and Oil Exchange: 



quotations for stocks', 
the California Stock 



Bid. 



Apollo J'. 

Ass. Oil Co. Stk. Tr. Cer 

Caribou 

Central Point Con 

Chicago Crude 

Claremont 

Forty 

Four 

Giant 

Home 

Imperial 

Independence 

Junction 

Kern 

Kern ( New) 

Kern River 

Monarch of Arizona. .... 

Monte Crista 

Occidental of W. Va 

Oil City Petroleum 

Peerless 

Piedmont 

Pittsburg 

Reed Crude 

S. F. & McKittrick 

Senator 

Sovereign 

Sterling 

Superior 

Thirty-Three 

Toltec 

Twenty-Eight 



7.00 
.95 



Asked. 

.38 

• 3.1 

10.00 

"!25 
.821/, 
.48 



.55 
.25 
.43 
14.00 
.28 
.20 
6.00 



9.00 



.70 

8.50 

.07 

.10 

2.00 



.70 
.31 



.05 

6.00 

.25 



.46 

16.00 

.29 



.25 
10.50 
.30 
.85 
.08 

lLOO 

"A6 

2.50 
3.00 

".33 

2.35 



12.00 



The 

Name 

Determines 

the 

Quality 



F IT L E R'8 § Oil Well Supply Co.'s 



W 



DRILLING 

CABLES 



at 
tit 

m 

>i\ 



?t 



Drilling Tools 
Engines & Supplies 
Pumping Outfits 



R. H. HERRON CO. 

509 Mission St. = SAN FRANCISCO 



The 

Name 

Determines 

the 

Quality 






PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 



Vol. 6. No. 13 



San Francisco, Cal., Saturday, Jan. 28, 1905 



Price lO Cents 



PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 

Published Weekly. 
The Oil Authority of tlic Pacil I 

oleum Miners' Ass'n. 



M \m\ K. Winn, Proprietor. 
F. S. Eastman, Editor and Manager. 



OFFli I rORl M. ROOMS 

U8 Pine Street - - San Fran lifornia 

Telephone, Hush 176. 

TERMS. 

One Year $2.50 

Six Months 1.50 

Three Months 1 .00 

Single Copies -. 10 

STRICTLY 1\ ADVANCE. 

Money should he sent by Postal Order, Draft 
or Registered Letter, addressed to Pacific Oil 
REPORTER, 318 Pine Street. San Francisco, rooms 
31-32-33. Communications must he accompanied 
by « liter's name and address, not necessarily for 
publication, but as a guarantee of good faith. 

Entered in the Postoffice at San Francisco, Cal- 
ifornia, as second class matter. 

Latest Quotations 



Following are the latest quotations for Califor- 
nia crude oil at the wells as offered by the Pa- 
cific Coast Oil Company : 

COALINGA. 

Price 

Gravity at 60 deg. temperature. per barrel. 

Oil of 22 deg., up to, but not including 24. .$0.20 
Oil of 24 deg., up to, but not including 25 . . .30 
Oil of 25 deg., up to, but not including 26. . .35 
Oil of 26 deg., up to, but not including 27 . . .40 
Oil of 27 deg., up to, but not including 28. . .45 
Oil of 28 deg., up to, but not including 29. . .50 
Oil of 29 deg., up to, but not including 30. . .55 

The Associated Oil Company is offering 17 Vii 
cents for fuel oil. 

SANTA MARIA. 

Gravity at 60 deg. Price per barrel 

Temperature. at Port Harford. 

24 deg. up to but not including 25 $ .25 

25 deg. up to but not including 26 30 

26 deg. up to but not including 27 35 

27 deg. or better 40 

KERN RIVER. 

All oil of 14 deg. gravity or better, except that 
contracted by the Pacific Coast Oil Co., is being 
taken by the Associated Oil Company at 18 cents 
per barrel under a year's contract with the Inde- 
pendent Agency. 

EASTERN QUOTATIONS. 

Pennsylvania $1 .42 

Tiona 1.57 

Coming . . •. 1 .09 

Newcastle 1 .34 

North Lima 95 

South Lima 90 

Indiana 90 

Somerset 83 

Ragland 55 

Petrolea (Ont.) 1.35 

KANSAS-INDIAN TERRITORY. 

Oil of 32 degrees gravity $0.87 

Oil of 31 ' '■_■ degrees gravity 82 

Oil of 31 degrees gravity 77 

Oil of 30' j degrees gravity 72 

Oil of 30 degrees gravity 67 

Oil of 29 fg degrees gravity 62 

Oil of 29 degrees gravity 57 

Oil of 2S 1 1. degrees gravity 52 

Oil of 28 degrees gravitv 47 



I he result of the success of the Independent 
(>:1 Producers' Agencj in contracting the out- 
put of the Kern Rivei field foi the current year 
parent in the noticeable acth it\ i 

district. Properties that have been shut 

tor a year or more with little ahead of 

them hut ruin ai preparations tor 

ng their oil as SOOn as pipe line connr 

can be made. Some little delay is being exper- 
int of it being necessarj to ship 
the pipe from the East, hut it is expected that 
ever} affiliated companj will he shipping by the 
end (if February — probably sooner. It is a 
cheerful spirit indeed that pervades the great 
i il field, yet one would be surprised at the dis- 
content prevailing among some of the companies 
still outside the organization. Many want to 
join for a year — during the life of the Independ- 
ent-Associated contract — and the be free to knock 
the market when a new contract is being made. 
This is what many were doing during the 
struggle just passed and it is to be regretted that 
even seme of those who had given their appar- 
ent support to the organization were secretly 
undermining it by their petty, nagging competi- 
tion. One of the greatest struggles the agency 
experienced was in keeping the companies to- 
gether and it is a well known and deeply re- 
gretted fact that the final compromise of 18 cents 
per barrel was brought about by the pressure 
brought to bear on it by some of the companies 
who declared that, unless some move was made 
at once, they would withdraw. It is believed 
that now the Associated is assured of the oil it 
needs it will not purchase from the independent 
companies and these corporations are likely to 
find it exceedingly difficult to dispose of their 
product at any price. There is plenty of room 
for them in the agency and an effort will be made 
to educate them up to the situation and to bring 
them into the fold during the year. This is their 
only hope for the next contract with the As- 
sociated is likely to be a much longer as well as 
a much stronger one. The California oil fields 
will produce over 35,000,000 barrels of oil in 
1905 — more if the market would allow it — for 
it is conservatively estimated that the present ca- 
pacity is over 40,000,000 with a possible con- 
sumption of 30.000,000 barrels. With this con- 
dition staring them in the face a producer of oil 
who will not protect himself by a long time con- 
tract with some one of the larger marketers of 
nil is simply inviting financial ruin to his com- 
pany and stockholders for he will not have the 
support of the Agency, Associated or Pacific 
Coast Oil Co. and to be "whip sawed" between 
them is not a fate that any corporation, backed 
by business principle, would desire. Of course 
there are some of the producers who have their 
own refineries and are in a position to take care 
of themselves and they would be foolish to tie 
themselves up. It is the producer that is not 
capable, from a business or financial point of 
view, to take care of himself or his corporation 
that we refer to and the sooner he gets the pro- 
duct of his poorly managed property oft" the mar- 
ket the sooner the Independent Oil Producers' 
Agency will he enabled to bring the oil producing 
business of California onto a paying basis. 



While there is a great deal of distrust re 

ing the tendencies ti ■ dism or excessive 

pervision of our personal affairs, 
are many signs of a widespread and useful 
movement toward sunn- sort oi I t)< i d regula 
""" "' the it to the investor. 

The regulation ot railroad ti legraphs and 
othei greal corporations has been activelj urged 
for mam years and the Government has already 
through its Department of Commerce assumed 
some of this responsibility. The newspapers 
and public men who once bitterly denounced any 
Government control of corporations are quieted 
by the larger sentiment which has come about 
the past three years. 

It is true that there are and always will be a 
few unpractical fanatics who will oppose any- 
thing that continues to modify the rights of 
corporations regardless of what may be the effect 
upon the public, but the tendency of the Ameri- 
can people is toward a broader recognition of 
privileges of the every day citizen. 

Our laws may be ever so good, yet they will 
not and cannot prevent social or financial dis- 
aster, but they can he so planned that an honest 
investor can be protected and saved from the 
greed and selfishness of the financial speculator. 
The experience of the past three years in Wall 
Street by which so many millions have been lost 
have been due quite as much to the carelessness 
of the investor as to the greed of the speculator. 
Had there been no excessive eagerness to gain 
large fortunes in a short time there would have 
been no "frenzied finance." If the thrifty people 
of this country would be content to invest their 
savings at a moderate rate of interest there are 
plenty of opportunities for a safe investment, and 
a prompt payment of interest would be assured. 
It is not necessary that these investments be 
entirely upon real estate loans or Government 
bonds, but there are plenty of opportunities in 
bonds of States, cities and railways, where ho 
di ubt need exist as to the prompt payment of 
interest and dividends. When they leave the 
class of securities upon which there is a sure and 
certain return and that have a recognized stand- 
ing in the business world, the investors com- 
mence to tempt fate and have practically no one 
but themselves to blame if the end is disaster. 
It is generally recognized in the business world 
that there are two great principles upon which 
every investment should be made. 

First, that money should not be placed in 
enterprises promising quick and large returns un- 
less the investor can afford to lose it, and there- 
fore is willing to take the risk. 

Second, when in doubt about the wisdom of 
an investment, consult some one thorou 
familiar with the situation and take all the e 
advice possible. 

Just how far the average investor can be pro- 
tected and led along these lines it is difficult to 
say. The thousands of wildcat schemes flo; 
.luring the past period of business activity have 
shown that rlie crop of unwise investors is very 
large. One of the ways hy which the schemers 
have secured large sums for their speculations 
been through advertising, and it is encourag- 
ing to know that the financial press of the Nation 
is awaking to the responsibility that it has for 
the protection of its readers. 






PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 



The Packard Anticline, 
Santa Maria 



By A. S. COOPER 

Description of the Packard Anticline, which 
lies north of the Santa Ynez river, at the mouth 
of the river, in Santa Barbara county: 

GEOLEGICAI. STRUCTURE. 

Two miles west from the easterly boundary of 
the rancho is the top of a dome from which the 
strata dip away in all directions. An anticlinal 
structure extends from this dome westerly to 
the western line of the rancho and the Pacific 
ocean, and beneath the ocean. "The apex of the 
dome and the axis of the anticline is shown 
on the accompanying map. 

This anticline and dome were formed while 
the formation was beneath the sea, and the top 
of the same was eroded by the action of the 
sea to nearly a level plain. On the surface of 
this plain was deposited unconformably with the 
underlying strata a bed of sand containing gravel 
and cobblestones which were eroded from the 
underlying strata. This sand bed is fifteen to 
twenty feet thick. The entire formation was 
then elevated en masse to a height of about 300 
feet above the sea, forming table land as is shown 
in photograph below the line A. B. In the fore- 
ground of the photograph is the town of Lompoc. 

Canons have been eroded in the sides of the 
dome and anticline so that the geological struc- 




clusive have been taken in different parts of the 
rancho. The places where a photograph is taken 
are marked with a number on the accompanying 
map (in a circle) corresponding with the number 
of the photograph ; the arow near this number is 




ture can be plainly seen and determined. 

The photographs numbered from 1 to 12 in- 



the direction in which the camera was pointed. 
The nearest symbol on the map indicating the 



strike and dip of the strata is shown in the pho- 
tograph. 

PETROLOGY. 

Rocks 1, 2 and 3 are gypsum and gypsiferous 
shales, in which the cracks and seams are filled 
with indurated petroleum oils. Some of the 
laminae are also impregnated with bitumen. 

Rocks 4, 5, 6 and 7 are leached shales which 
subsequent to their leaching were silicified. It is 
difficult to scratch them with a knife but they 
are very frangible and break readily beneath a 
drill. 

Rocks 8, 9 and 10 are silicified shales, every 
minute crack being filled with asphaltum and 
laminae discolored with bitumen. It is difficult 
to scratch this rock with a knife, but it breaks 
readily before a drill. 

Plate 1 1 shows casts of fossil shell. The fossil 
shells were leached from the shale, leaving a mold 
of the shell and a cast of interior of the same. 
The place formerly occupied by the shell is 
now filled with bitumen. The adjoining rock 
is also filled with bitumen, which has turned 
brown by evaporation. 

Rocks 12, 13, 14, 15 and 16 are bituminized 
and silicified shale. The dark part of these rocks 
when heated in a tube give condensations of pe- 
troleum oil on the sides of the tube. Small vesi- 
cles often ocur in these rocks, which are filled 
with friable or tacky asphaltum. 

Rocks 17, 18, 19 and 20 are leached shales. 
All the bases, such as lime, iron, etc., have been 
leached from these shales, and the shales were 
then converted to soluble silicia by alkaline solu- 
tions. Then the laminae of the shale were im- 
pregnated with bitumen to a greater or less ex- 
tent. ' The bitumen in those rocks can be removed 
in solution by chloriform. 

Rocks 20, 21, 22 and 23 show crystalline sur- 
faces of silica which occur in the cracks of the 
silicified and bituminized shale. 

Rocks 24 and 25 show asphaltum which occur 
in the cracks and seams of the shale in the bluffs 
of the ocean. 

The rocks described above can be found in 
the greatest profusion throughout the rancho, 
nearly every exposure of these rocks showing the 
presence of bitumen. 
In numerous places throughout the dome and 
anticline the strata have faulted instead of bend- 



PACIFIC oil REPORTER 



up hut a small throw and 
the r ng the fault has been crushed 

ins petroleum oil 
- t-n.le.l. which ited, formii 

philtum, clearK indicating the presence 
beneath thi 

liquid asphaltum ascend from rocks 

underlying the ocean, which arc carried td the 

hy wind and tide arid arc smeared upon 

the riK-ks. showing the present activity of this 

anticline. 

halations "t gases occur in the 
near this rancho, which stupefies fish. In 
the summei i large number of stupefied 

tish floated past the outer etui of the Lompoc 
wharf bell} upward and came ashore near the 
: nta , i nez river. This destruction 
of tish by mephitis gases has occurred a number 
of times near the shore in many places where 
petroleum deposits are known to exist. 

Two miles east of the top of the dome near 
the eastern boundary of the rancho the strata 
dip at a high ancle beneath the alluvial which 
lills the Canada Santa Lucia and the large area 
ind lying east of the Canada Santa 
Lucia. 

On the south the strata dip beneath the Santa 
'i nez river. 

On a bluff of the Pacific ocean the arch of the 
anticline is very much shattered and distorted 
since the rocks forming the arch were silicified. 
innumerable fissures and seams were opened; 
these arc now filled with asphaltum. These fis- 



where small faults exist. 

In an. anticline King about two miles north- 

I this dome and anticline there are live 

wells producing oil. It is reported that each 
well yields over 300 barrels a da} of light gravit] 

oil. The sand in which the oil is obtained is 

■ ted to be over 800 feet thick. 

There is ample wood and water for drilling 



An Cxclusive Item 




and other purposes. Most any place on the rancho 
can be reached by natural roads. The main line 
of the Southern Pacific Railroad passes through 
the western end of the rancho. Wharves can 
be constructed on the sea shore. 

Oil on this property can be cheaply marketed, 
owing to the nearness of the railroad, but es- 
pecially owing to the fact that wharves can be 
cheaply constructed on the sea shore. 

In consideration of the foregoing described geo- 




sures and seams vary from a mere crack to two 
or three inches in width. The induration of the 
oil to asphaltum has sealed the formation, pre- 
venting further escape of gas or petroleum. This 
occurs in many other places throughout the rancho 



logical conditions petroleum oil and natural gas 
should be obtained in large quantities in drilled 
wells within a mile of the axis of the anticline 
and the apex of the dome or qua qua versal shown 
on the accompanying map. 



Again the Bakersfield /■.'< ho has scoi 
the California/!, the following appe; 
in the January 17th issue of the former 
publcation in the form of an 
h is on account of its abso usive- 

ness" that we take the liberty oi 
ing it in full. Here it is: 

"scoops." 

"The Pacific ( >il Rbporter roasts 
the California/! for getting 'sore' and try- 
ing to 'knock' the Independent Oil Pro- 
ducers' Agenq I se the Echo scooped 

it in reporting the news ot the contract 
between the agency and the Associated 
and our contemporary devotes a column 
and a half to an effort to squirm out of 
the charge and a laborious argument to 
show how a scoop is not a scoop when 
it is the Californian that gets scooped. 
Our contemporary is silly. The best of 
papers get scooped once in a while and our 
contemporary gets scooped so regularly 
that one would suppose that its editor 
would learn to take it philosophically af- 
ter awhile. But he never gets scooped, 
however often it may happen, without 
getting sore, either in public or in private 
and he never gets an item of news in ad- 
vance of other papers without giving it a 
three-story, double-column head and brag- 
ging about editorially for days afterward 
even if the item is not actually worth ten 
lines. Knowing this wealceness of our 
contemporary the Echo never rubs it in 
when the Californian gets scooped and is 
feeling sore, and when, once in a great 
while, we miss an item and our contem- 
porary gets it we rejoice from the bottom 
cf our heart over the good it does him. 

"We were particularly pleased when 
our neighbor was able to annocunce the 
ratification of the agency's contract with 
the Associated ahead of any other paper 
in the United States because his 
printers had just finished throwing 
in a big black four-column head 
and a freaked sub-head announcing 
that the agency never would ratify the 
contract and that the terms of the agency's 
by-laws made it impossible to ratify the 
contract and that the independent men 
would shovel mud and live on the tule 
rcots before they would ratify such a con- 
tract, et cetera, et cetera, et cetera. The 
only real, genune, important scoop that 
we ever knew our contemporary to get in 
connection with the oil business was when 
a year or eighteen months ago it 'was 
able to positively announce that the Stan- 
dard Oil Company was going to build an 
enormous oil refinery in the Kern Rver 
field.' As yet no other paper in the world, 
so far as we know, has got hold of this 
news or unearthered the source of our con- 
temporary's information. We would not, 
however, cast any reflection upon the 
authenticity of our contemporary's an- 
nouncement. The Standard may, in cycles 
of time, build a refinery in the Kern 
River field and if it does, and our contem- 
porary is still toiling with the faber we 
predict that the whole front page will be 
devoted tu the history' of his scoop. If, 
on the other hand he has passed to his re- 
ward we expect that he will march up the 
middle of the golden streets of paradise 
and stop the herald angels in the middle 
of their song with the informaton that 
that news was published in the Califor- 
nian a thousand years ago." 




PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 



Oil Fuel for the Navy and 
OtHer Vessels 



The action of the board in connection with the 
oil-fuel investigations for the Navy has encour- 
aged oil men and oil-fuel engineers to a consider- 
able degree. Many of the former doubts con- 
cerning the practical use of the oil-fuel for naval 
craft and commercial vessels have been eliminated 
in the late tests and investigations. One reason 
for this improved order of things is that since the 
original tests and investigations of some few- 
years ago the oil-fuel users and engineers have 
introduced some very greatly improved devices 
for the application and utilization of the oil- 
fuel. Formerly there were many handicaps. 
There were excessive wastages of the oil due to 
poor apparatus. But in the late experiments the 
best cf apparatus was employed with proportion- 
ately increased advantages. It was proven that 
under normal conditions, with experienced crew, 




fy 5 




and up-to-date contrivances a uniform burning 
of the oil could be depended upon. The evapo- 
rative output and the conditions of efficiency were 
advanced through the higher order of study and 
advantage derived from the use of modern de- 
vices and ideas. Highly heated compressed air 
was experimented with and found to be more ef- 
fective than steam for spraying. Steam spraying 
devices are extensively used on shore, as is known, 
and most of the oil-fuel plants rely upon this 
method for spraying purposes. In the warship 
it was found advisable to have a combination plant 
by which either steam or compressed air could be 
used for spraying. Then in the event of the 



need of one of the other system it could be used 
promptly. The tests developed some points al- 
ready known in the oil-fuel engineering line, but 
which points are often overlooked. The writer 
has traveled considerable in the steam plants, 
ship yards, and general industrial establishments 
in recent years and has noticed the engineers ar- 
ranging for the use of crude oil on practically 
the same conditions that arrangements are made 
for the burning of refined oil. The evaporating 
efficiency of crude oil is almost equal to that of 
refined, but it has been proven that it is more 
dangerous to use. It was also brought out that 
the oil, whether crude or refined, operated in the 
burners to best advantage when the oil was 
heated. This fact has been well known to en- 
gineers since the first use of oil, yet very many 
of the oil-burning plants I examined used the 
oils direct from a cold tank. The stinting of 
the numbers of burners in the oil-burning fur- 
nace has always been an objection. Therefore the 
tests for the Navy were made with numbers of 
reserve burners, and these were used and tests 
made, with the result that it was determined that 
up to a certain number, an increased quantity 
of burning space assisted in the generation of uni- 
form heat. Crowding of burners or using too 
few burners have the opposite result. 

THE PREVENTION OF CLOGGING. 
The experimenters did something in these tests 
that proved wise. They adjusted strainers at va- 
rious points in the supply pipes for the purpose of 
ascertaining the proportion of foreign matter se- 
cured. Apparently clear oils were found to be 
freely distributed with foreign matter, such as 
chips from sides of wood tanks, scale from rusts 
of pipes and metals, etc. Therefore in a short 
while all of the strainers at different points were 
coated with the foreign matter. If it were not for 
the strainers the substances would enter the valves 
and joints of the system and create trouble. The 
best place to put the strainers is at the suction 
and discharge pipes. 

SOME MECHANICAL POINTS. 

Figure 1 is a drawing showing the plan of one 
of the man-holes in an oil tank for naval pur- 
poses. The head b is provided with a shoulder as 
shown and this flushes with the tank very se- 
curely, when the nut is tightened on the threaded 
shaft of the manhole head as at a. Sometimes 
the pattern of manhole shown in figure 2 is 
used. One of the defects in this type of manhole 
prevails at the neck. The arrow indicates the 
point where the corroding and rusting of the oils 
often happens as at c. I observed quite a num- 
ber of necks of manholes in this condition to the 
corroding elements. Still the neck is useful in 
some respects, and at times may be absolutely 
necessary. Figure 3 shows the tapered plug sys- 
tem of choking the oil channel. There is . a 
threaded shaft fitted into a correspondingly 
threaded union, and by turning the shaft by means 
of the bar, the plug is raised or depressed for the 
choking of the opening to the interior as at d. 
The ball system of controlling the oil flow is 
shown in figure 4. The ball is steel, and of suffi- 
cient diameter to control the passages leading to 
the central flow from the different directions, as 
represented by the arrow at f and the arrow 
at g. This plan is chiefly used for a self-regu- 
lating check-valve. 



CAPPED RESERVOIR OPENINGS. 

Figure 5 shows a design of capped top, some- 
times used for the oil tanks. The arrow h marks 
the lead washer or packing often used to seal 
the cap. The washer often extends over the 
edges too far and becomes an annoyance. It is 
best to trim the edges flush with the shoulders 
of the cap. Then again in some of these types 
of capped reservoirs the writer noticed that the 
metal had become weakened as at h by the rot- 
ting away of the scale and the iron. 
Thus a crevice is made into which accumulations 
of foreign stuff collect and these bring about se- 
ries of complications which are troublesome. The 
affected parts are shown in detail in the cross sec- 
tional sketching in figure 6. The oil materials 
will often ooze away into the bores of the con- 
necting bolts as shown at m, j and k, and consume 
the hardest of metal. These parts weaken with 
the progress of the corroding and leakage de- 
velops. Often dangerous places are thus created. 
Figure 7 illustrates a handy and strong mode of 




-Tz 9 e 




&ff 7 



is. 



®lzg 8 



connecting two sheets of metal in the construction 
of an oil tank or pipe union. The bolts are set 
into the counter-sunk places and then the flanges 
are headed in as shown, making an exceedingly 
strong joint. The process of rivetting laps in 
oil containing tanks is shown in figure 8. The 
letter n describes the line of rivets. The mistake 
is often made of assuming a definite line with 
the holes and then when the rivets or bolts are 
secured in place the strain upon the metal causes 
the fracture as at n. The proper methods con- 
sist in making a double or triple row of the con- 
necting bolts, thus distributing the union. The 
mechanical side of the application of oil fuel in 
the navj' has progressed wonderfully in late years. 
There is every indication of further progress. 
A TRAVELER. 



PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 



7 



THE SOUTHERN FIELDS 

idually getting 

in a i rol the local nil market. 

reduction of the Amalga- 

md what oil it brings in from 
other ible to underbid any other COT1- 

r individual and is now looked on as the 
real n in the South. The new 

ement looking to a consolidation 
of interests In local oil men will rather help 
the Associated than hinder it and the probabil- 
re that this oil will he marketed through 
the Associated. The Standard does not seem 
to be interfering with any arrangements that 
are being made. It is not buying any oil in the 
Southern fields, appearing content to till what 
few contracts it now holds. These facts, of 
■ ■. strengthen the suspicion that the two 
large concerns are closely allied. If they are 
not, it is likely they will he in the near future, 
in the opinion of oil men ; because if the plan 
of the Standard is to make itself the marketing 
agency for all the California oil. it will become 
^ar.lless of the Associated. The idea 
seems to be that the Standard is willing to allow 
the Associated or any other concern to get tilings 
organized, and then to begin the tight for con- 
trol, as a light with one large concern could be 
made much mere easily than with a hundred 
smaller concerns. In this case the Standard 
] know who they were fighting and would 
know where and how to find them. The policy 
of the Standard has always been to buy its com- 
pritors out if such a thing were possible. If 
this could not be done opposition was crushed. 

This appears to be the situation now. In the 
meantime, while the larger concerns are fighting 
for supremacy the small fry is getting squeezed 
unmercifully. But for those who can and will 
"hang on," there is a good time coming, because 
in the not distant future oil will bring something 
approximating, at least, its real value, and the 
man who produces the .oil will receive the 
benefit. 

The co-called Salt Lake pool in the western 
extension of the local field continues to show up 
some immense wells. Another has been com- 
pleted which promises to be as large as any pre- 
ceding it, and the limits of the pool, if pool it be, 
have not yet been determined. It is possible 
the field may extend in unbroken formation to 
the Santa Monica range of hills far west of 
Sherman, where for years seepages have been ob- 
served among the canyons there. It was in this 
vicinity that a well was drilled about four years 
ago. but owing to crude methods, etc., the hole 
was shallow when abandoned. A good well 
might be obtained now in the same locality. And 
this reminds one that there are thousands of 
acres all over the State which were long ago 
condemned as oil land, which probably is as good 
oil land as any in the State; but was tested when 
a hole 1000 feet or 1200 feet deep was con- 
sidered sufficient to prove up the land. Later 
developments have shown that 1000 feet holes 
do not prove anything. The Salt Lake pool 
itself is an example of this. There are now 
probably a dozen shallow wells on the very bor- 
der of the Salt Lake property which are produc- 
ing possiblj five or ten barrels daily. What lies 
in the lower oil stratum under these wells can 
he easily conjectured. 

The market here has not improved during the 



past week, and there is no en cut ottered 

■ ■ iir take a long disl ■■■ of the san- 

ation. Oil is selling from 25 cents to 55 cents 
per barrel, which is practical!) giving it away. 
w 1111 in R. 

This field is as quiet at present as it has been 

in the past four vcars. The Muiphv ( )il Co.. 

: concerns, which has for several 

been running from four to six strings of 

lias shut down Complete!] on new work 

and is confining itself to pumping. Its storage 

tanks are full and very little oil is being moved. 

The Ceneral Oil Co.. the largest company in 
the district, has cut its work down from six 
strings to two. hut will probably keep these run- 
ning indefinitely. The company has such an im- 
mense extent of proven oil land that it will be 
necessary to keep two strings going simply to 
protect its lines, but a policv has been adopted 
whereby a number of wells will be drilled on 
section 22, which has heretofore been left alone. 
The reason for drilling here now is that it is 
first-class territory and the neighbors are crowd- 
ing the lines a little. This company owns sec- 
tion 15 directly north, which gives as good in- 
dications as any of the land south ever did, but 
which has not yet been touched. This property 
will probably be a good thing fifty years from 
now. 

Work has been suspended temporarily by all 
the smaller companies in the field owing to low 
prices. All are pumping, however, and selling 
their prod-uct to the Union Oil Co., which has 
a pipe line to the field. 



SUNSET - MIDWAY 
JOTTINGS 



Bakersfield, Cal., Jan. 25, 1905. 

Times are beginning to brighten up on the 
West Side. Never during the past three years 
has the general appearance for business been as 
good as they are to-day. Jewett & Blodgett are 
running their refinery day and night to its full 
capacity. The reputation of their asphaltum is 
world-wide and there is none better. They re- 
cently filled a large order from Liverpool. The 
Sunset Diamond Oil Company is just finishing 
a good well on its 40-acre lease near the depot, 
on sections 13-11-24. Windy Waltham has 
charge of their property. 

Mr. Canfield is drilling on the new well near 
the Lion Oil Company property. He had a 
fishing job last week and in triyng to pull his 
casing he collapsed his derrick. A new top was 
at once bult and they are now going along 
smoothly. 

F. F. Weed, of the Maricopa Oil Company, 
is now at the lease and is going to put all of the 
company's wells on production. They have two 
wells that may be considered as good as any in 
the field, but at present they are not in produc- 
ing condition. However, they are shipping sev- 
eral carloads each week. 

Mr. Hickey on the Adeline Oil Company 
property is just completing a loading rack along- 
side of the new switch that the railroad has just 
completed on this lease. When finished this 
company will have facilities for loading five oil 
cars at once. They are installing a Grindrod 
pump, a new rotary pump just patented, and the 
owners guarantee that it will handle 500 barrels 



per hour. The new well of this company, which 

has Howe 

tw it o the i he rate ot 300 barrel 

daj and thej now have about 17,000 barrels in 
sti lage. Their new rig for the next well is all 
and drilling will commence on this 
well within the next ten days. This company 
has closed a large contract tor oil and will drill 
ll new wells to supplv the demand for road 
oil. This Sunset oil is peculiarlj adapted for 
road pui poses and readily brings an advanced 

The Petroleum Centei Oil Company on 2-1 1- 

24 has completed its new reservoir, which holds 
35,000 barrels. Mr. Best has just perforated 
their well No. 1 and ii is a first-class well and 
the oil somewhat lightei gravity than the usual 
run or Sunset oil, being about 1 ^ gravity. The 
rig for the next well is completed and they 
"spudded in" on that well on the 34d of this 
month. < 

Mr. Leach of the United Crude Oil Company 
is having his hands full attending to the pro- 
ducing and loading of the oil that company is 
delivering on contracts. It is safe to say that 
no well in Kern County can make a better show- 
ing than the No. 2 well of the United Crude 
Oil Company. Its capacity is not known, as 
they have not room in their reservoir to hold 
only a few thousand barrels and the well will 
produce that amount in a short time. 

The Paraffine Oil Company has just finished 
a first-class well on its holding on 25-32-23 near 
the center of the section. Mr. Gilfillan finished 
this well at 1465 feet and has perforated the 
same and the oil came up within 100 feet of 
the surface. He has baled it considerable and 
never lowered the oil appreciably. He will now 
install a pump and give the well a test. There 
is considerable talk of a pipe line from this part 
of the Midway field to the railroad at Mericopa. 
It seems probable that it will materialize within 
the next few months. This section 23-32-23 is 
considered among oil men to he the cream of 
the West Side fields. 

Chansler & Canfield are doing their usual 
amount of development work on their properties 
in the upper Midway field. There are now 
about fifty good producers in the Midway field 
and it seems as though the Santa Fe would see 
it to their advantage to extend the railroad from 
Maricopa for about seven miles and cover all 
these good properties. It will come some day 
and I am one who believes it will come soon. — 
" ( 'sually.' 



One of the leading periodicals of the East 
which carries a great deal of high-class advertis- 
ing and goes into the best families of the Nation 
has announced editorially that it will insert no 
financial advertisements without careful scrutiny 
and even possible investigation that would show 
the reliability of the advertiser. Many other 
periodicals make a similar examination o: 
firms proposing to use their columns, and 
this does not prevent the publicity of undesirable 
financial schemes. 

If the press of the Nation would generally 
take this position and insist upon the fullest in- 
vestigation of even advertisement offered, it 
would go a long n:n toward protecting the in- 
vestor. It is doubtful if there can be created 
any sort of laws or commission of Federal con- 
trol which will ming com- 
panies and ' !i protect the investor, 



PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 





FRESNO COUNTY ABSTRACT COMPANY 

Incorporated Under the Laws of California January 21, 1901. 

Capital Stock $100,000.00 

FULL-YPAIDUP 

SEARCHERS OF RE CORDS AND CONVEYANCE 

Abstracts of Title Carefully Compiled at Reasonable Rates. 

NO. 111S K ST., FRESNO, CAL. 

SMITH, EMERY <& CO. 

= Chemical Engineers 

ANALYSES 

PETROLEUM -== Calorific Value, 
Fractional Distillation, Refining, Vis- 
cosity, Freezing, Candle Power, Burn= 
ing, Tests, Etc. Boiler Feed & Drink- 
ing Water. Umpire Work on Oil Contracts. 

83-85 New Montgomery Street 

SAN FRANCISCO 

CLOT & CRIST MACHINE CO. 

Designers and Builders of Special and Labor=Saving Machinery 

Estimates Furnished on Power and Pumping Plants Complete 

Special Attention Paid to the Repairing of Steam Pumps and Other 1 Machinery 

manufacturers of THE BEST PIMP ON EARTH 

For Water Works and Mining Purposes 
For Oil Pipe Lines and Oil Burning Plants 

Artesian Deep Well and Sinking Pumps 

Electric Driven Pumps of Every Kind 
AGENTS FOR 

3= Horse Power Stlckney Gasoline Engine 

Telephone John 596 

137439 Beale Street, San Francisco 

R. P. WADDELL 

GENERAL AGENT FOR 

X-Ray and Dandy Windmills 

PUMPS, PIPING, TANKS, FR4MES, 

GALVANIZED STEEL AND WOOD TOWERS 

Aermotor Mills and Repairs 

ESTIMATES ON IR RIGATING OUTFITS 

35 Beale St., San Francisco 

Branch Office: 353 11th St.. Oakland, Cal. 

H. B. GUTHREY 

Oil Well Contractor 

Specifications furnished on wells of any depth 
==^^= in any country ^=^=^^^= 





WATER SHUT OFF IN OIL WELLS 

Many valuable oil properties in this state saved by our process 
which is sure and permanent 

Our references are our past customers 

H. B. GUTHREY, Coalinga, California 



the newspapers and magazines through which 
the advertising must be done, and through which 
the investing public must be reached, have it in 
their hands to put a safety valve on this sort of 
rascality. 

It is unquestionably a widespread National 
feeling that a greater and closer supervision 
should be had over all sorts of doubtful adver- 
tising and that the advertising pages of news- 
papers and magazines should be edited with as 
much care as those devoted to reading matter. 
The power of the press in this instance is very 
clear, and we hope to see it extended through the 
coming year to cover a larger and broader field 
than in the past. — Bonds and Mortgages. 



COALINGA 



Arline is 1675 feet deep, with 8-inch casing. 
Those interested seem to feel good, but say the 
oil sand has not been reached. 

The new management of the Wabash will be- 
gin development work next week by rigging up 
for another well. 

Independence No. 9 is in the first sand at 700 
feet. The 11 5r8 pipe has been landed and 
9 5 8 is being put in. No. 10 is spudding and 
will be followed next week by No. 11. 

Westmoreland Coalinga No. 3 is / 00 feet deep, 
with 10-inch pipe. Nos. 1 and 2 are pumping 
8000 barrels of 28 gravity oil per month. 

Missouri-Coalinga No. 1 is 710 feet deep, 
with 10-inch casing. At 550 feet 100 feet of oil 
sand was encountered, from which Superintend- 
ent Kerr says fifty barrels a day could be pumped. 

Pittsburg-Coalinga No. 1 is 1735 feet deep, 
and is being finished with 6-inch pipe. On 
Thursday the well made nearly 500 barrels of 
oil in a few hours, but sanded up. It is being 
cleaned out. On the completion of this well No. 
2 will be rigged up. 

No. 4 of- the Section 7 Oil Co. is being fin- 
ished up. It looks like another No. 1. 

By incessant work Joe Corey has succeeded in 
rebuilding No. 2 rig, destroyed by fire two weeks 
ago, and will at once clean out the well, from 
which an increased flow is expected. 

The sand pump has been working in St. Paul- 
Fresno No. 3, which is now in good condition. 
The pump has been put in. 

Drilling has been resumed on the Big Shell 
prospecting well, under lease to the Home Oil 
Co. At 1250 feet a string of 6-inch drive pipe 
was put in. It is intended to carry this pipe 
to a depth of 1500 feet. 

The Coalinga-Pacific is building a rig for well 
No. 2. 

E. R. Graham on Wednesday perforated No. 
13, on section 28. A pocket of gas had evidently 
been struck, for the well, though surrounded by 
pumpers, was a veritable gusher for about twenty 
minutes. 

Some interest will attach to the operation of 
the Vander Zee Oil Co., which will work in 
the southeastern extension of the field, on hither- 
to untested ground, comprising the east half of 
section 6, on which the Elmore well was started. 

Sauer Dough No. 5 is in oil at 900 feet, and 
will be finished with 814-inch pipe. Mr. Spinks 
has made quick work of this well, and has rea- 
son to expect it to be as good as any of the first 
three, which are big producers. 

The Tavern is still wrestling with the water 



problem at 1950 iert. Six-inch pipe will be used 
-<■ of? the flow, which is unusually 1 
theastern el deep, i 

and casing arc in good shape, and the pa) 
is expected within a week. 

II. H. Guthrey was in San Francisco for 
several days on oil business, returning to Coal- 
— Record. 



Oil Development in Near- 
by Foreign Countries 
in 1903 



MEXICO, 

< )nlj a limited amount of petroleum was pro- 
duced in Mexico during 1903. The Mexican 
Petroleum Companj is still operating at Ebano, 
near Tampico, where fourteen wells from 400 
to 800 feet deep have been drilled and are pro- 
ducing enough fuel tor the engines operating sev- 
eral drilling wells. A refinery is in course of con- 
struction at this point, and considerable tankage 
has been erected. 

There are a numher of wells near Vera Cruz 
that have produced a limited quantity of heavy 
petroleum. A numher of test wells that were 
successful in securing any large production have 
heen drilled in numerous localities along the Gulf 
coast. 

There are numerous surface indications in the 
district of Pochutta, State of Oxacaca, and in 
Yucatan. 

The scarcity of coal and the heavy Government 
import tax of 7Vi cents per gallon on crude and 
33 cents per gallon on refined petroleum is an 
incentive for finding a productive field. 

The large proportion of crude imported from 
the United States into Mexico is caused by the 
very heavy tax on the refined products and the 
comparatively light tax on the crude, thus mak- 
ing it desirable to import and refine the crude 
within the borders of the Republic. 

HAWAIIAN ISLANDS. 

These islands have for many years depended 
on the importation of Wellington coal from Aus- 
tralia and Nanaimo coal from British Colum- 
bia. It is necessary to transport the former 5000 
miles and the latter over 2000 miles. The United 
States Government has for a number of years 
maintained a coaling station on these islands, 
which is supplied from San Francisco at a cost 
of from $9 to $10 per ton. The coal supplied to 
the sugar plantations and other manufacturers 
probably costs $2 to $3 more per ton. All the 
coal imported is of an inferior quality and con- 
tains a large percentage of sulphur, which causes 
it to deteriorate upon exposure. Probably be- 
tween three and three and one-half barrels of 
petroleum woidd equal the calorific value per ton 
of the best coal found in Hawaii. The develop- 
ment of a very large quantity of fuel petroleum 
in California made it possible to introduce this 
fuel at a cost of about 3 cents per gallon, or 
$1.35 per barrel, and as 314 barrels of petroleum 
is equal to one ton of coal, the cost would be about 
$4.39 for the quantity of petroleum necessary to 
equal one ton of coal. This reduces the cost of 
fuel more than 50 per cent, besides adding many 
other advantages resulting from the use of pet- 
roleum in a tropical country where the work of 
the stoker is especially onerous. It is highly prob- 
able that California petroleum will eventually be- 



PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 



WESTERN COOPERAGE CO. 

MANUFACTURERS OP 

STAVES and HEADING 

For Both Tlftht „„,| Slack Work. 



OUR SPECIALTIES ARE 

White Spruce Saies and Heading Fir Tight Barrel Staves and 

all ready to set up lor Fish, Heading lor Oil, Lard. Pork, 

Pickles or Lard packages ol g ee) t| C f( c 

any size. ' ooo 

Fir Slack Barrel Staves and Heading for Asphalt, Lime 
Cement and Bottle Barrels. 



Prompt and Courteous Attention to alt Inquiries. 



MILLS at Aberdeen, Wash, and Boulton, Ore. 



1// \ / \ 
Arline Oil Company, a corporation. Pi! 

place of business. San i Location 

of property, Fresno County, California. 

that at a meeting of 

I rectors held on the 24th day of December, 

1904, assessmenl N : one cent per share 

was levied upon the capital stock of the ccrpo- 

ration, paj the 3rd day of 

February, 1905, to J. W. Pauson, Secretary, at 

the office of the Company, at Room .Sou Parrott 

Building, San Francisco. Any stock upon which 

this assessment shall remain unpaid on said 3rd 

1 February, 1905, will be delinquent and 

advertised leu sale at public auction, and, unless 

iii is made before, w ill be sold on the 27th 

day of February, 1905, to pay the delinquent 

assessment, togethei with costs of advertising and 

expenses of the sale. J. \V. Pauson, 

Secretary. 
Room 500 Parrott Building, S. F., Cal. 



Lacy Manufacturing Company 



Manufacturers of 



Steel Water Pipe 
General Sheet 
Iron Works 
Oil Well Casing 
Oil Stills 

OIL STORAGE AND WAGON TANKS 

Works: Cor. New Main and Date streets, P- O. Box 231, Station C. 

Baker Block Telephone Main 196 

Office, 334 North Main Street, Los Angeles, Cal. 





BATES' 

PATENT CASING TONGS 



1416-1426 19th St.. Bakersfield, Cal. 



Fills a long-felt want. No more need of 
pole and rope for screwing up casing. Bates 
Tongs can be applied to the casing anywhere 
In driving or pulling without danger of injury 
or parting casing. 

Set No. 1, with any two size jaws from 9% 
to 13 ?£ inches. 

Set No. 2, with any two size jaws fro-n 4 to 
gYs Inches. 




CAR 



TANKS 



TANKS AND STORAGE 

FOR Al_l_ USES 

We Carry in Stock Car Tanks of following sizes: We Carry in Stock Storage Tanks for Oil 

6,000 Gallons 
7,000 " 
8,000 " 

and can mount on wood or steel underfran.es. 



of all sizes up to and including 
S5.000 BARRELS 

Oil Refineries Complete Oar Specialty 



WARREN OITV BOILER 

OFFICE and WORKS:-\A/ARREN 



WORKS 

OHIO. 



10 



PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 




Bullfrog Extension Mining 
Company 



This is one of the big, strong, progressive companies operating at the phenomenal camp of Bull- 
frog, Nye County, Nevada. This company is meeting with splendid success. Illustrated pros- 
pectus with market letter now ready. Big advance in the price of shares within a few days. Price 
20 cents. 

ANOTHER GOOD BUY. Shares of the PAXTON HALFMOON BAY OIL COM- 
PANY. Capitalization $500,000, par value 1. All treasury shares. More than half of the 
capitalization now in the treasury. One well 1600 feet deep. A small .block of stock for sale at 
5 cents per share. Send for printed matter about Halfmoon Bay that produces the highest grade 
oil found in commercial quantities in the world. 



Use the wires. It pays. 



DEBENTURE SURETY COMPANY (Inc.), 

Rialto Bldg., A-10, San Francisco, Cal. 



Incorporate in Arizona 

CHEAPEST, BEST AND MOST LIBERAL LAWS, 
CAPITAL NOT LIMITED. NO FRANCHISE TAX. 
PRIVATE PROPERTY EXEMPT. MEETINGS HELD ANYWHERE. 

No State merits Required. Stock Sales can commence the day we file articles. 
Send three copies of Articles and we attend to everything, and wire you. 

L. C. NICKERSON, Notary Public, Wickenburg, Arizona 



DIRECTORS. 
M. Grossmayer. 
S. Fleisher. 
J. B. Bonetti. 
T. R. Finley. 
S. A. Johnson. 
C. F. Bramming. 
James Smith. 



OFFICERS. 
M. Grossmayer, Prei. 
S. Fleisher, Vice Pres. 
J. B. Bonetti, Treas. 
T. R. Finley, Sec r y- 
S. A. Johnson, Gen. Mgr. 



Barca Oil Company 



CAPITALIZATION, $500,000; PAR VALUE STOCK, $1.00 PER SHARE. 



The property of this Company consists of 250 acres of land, situated one-half mile north of 
the famous Purissima well of the Union Oil Company, which has been flowing 500 barrels of oil 
daily for the past year, and it is directly in line between that well and the same company's 
famous 12,000-barrel gusher on the Hartnell Tract. 

We are offering enough stock in our Company at 25 cents per share to drill our first well, 
and at this price the stock is the best and safest investment so far offered in the Santa Maria Dis- 
trict, and a sure money-maker for those who invest. 

Our well No. 1 is now drilling and will be pushed to completion as rapidly as possible. 

For further information address 



BARCA OIL COMPANY, 



SANTA MARIA, CAL. 



come a great factor in the navigation of the Pacific 
hy steamships belonging to the transportation com- 
panies and also by those of the United States 
Navy. The results of trials on numerous trading 
steamers on the Pacific Coast have been so emi- 
nently satisfactory that it is only a question of the 
supply for general introduction. 

ONTARIO. 

The production of petroleum in Canada comes 
almost entirely from the Petrolia and Oil Springs 
districts, in Lamberton County, and Bothwell, in 
Kent County, Ontario. One of the first produc- 
tive wells was put down at Oil Springs in 1862, 
which flowed vigorously. For nearly twenty-five 
years the quantity of petroleum produced in 
Canada has been gradually declining, notwith- 
standing the opening of a number of smaller 
pools wit'hin the last four years. One of the 
most important of the recently developed pools 
is known as the Dutton district, in Elgin County. 
There was also some production in the south- 
eastern portion of Essex County. At Brantford, 
in Brant County, two wells found petroleum in 
the underlying Medina sand near the close of 
1903. 

Nearly all of the crude petroleum produced in 
Canada comes from the Corniferous limestone, 
and contains a considerable proportion of sul- 
phureted hydrogen, which imparts an unpleasant 
odor to the finished product, unless removed by 
special treatment. 

The wells are usually from 330 to 400 feet 
in depth, and are cheaply drilled, as only one 
string of casing is required. Owing to these 
conditions, there is a great number of wells in 
operation compared with the production secured. 
The present production in Canada does not 
amount to more than 40 per cent of the quantity 
cosumed, the deficiency being supplied by the 
United States. 

In Quebec a number of deep wells have been 
drilled in the last ten years on Gaspe Peninsula. 
In all, fifty-two wells have been drilled in this 
locality, from 500 to 3700 feet in depth. A num- 
ber of these have shown traces only of petroleum 
of good quality, one variety being much lighter 
in gravity than the other. There are several well- 
defined anticlinals in a general southeast-north- 
west direction, more or less faulted. 

The strata containing the petroleum are sand- 
stone, alternating with red or brown shales, which 
are supposed to be of Devonian age. 

The repent developments south of Moncton. 
New Brunswick, are still progressing, and deeper 
drilling has developed more productive sands. 
The production in this field at the close of 1903 
is estimated to be close to 100 barrels per day, 
the product of fiften wells, if pumped to their 
capacity. The depth varies from 1000 to 1500 
feet. 

Several deep wells drilled within the last four 
years near Lake Aimslie, Cape Breton, have failed 
to find petroleum in paying quantities, although 
the succession of shales and sandstone deposits are 
quite similar to those of the Pennsylvania produc- 
tive region. 

The development of- petroleum already men- 
tioned in a former report in southeast Kootenay 
district, Alberta, has not as yet taken place. 
There are some evidence of petroleum springs in 
this region, and the structural conditions are con- 
sidered favorable — U. S. Geological Survey. 



PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 



11 



\M> oil I \ 
CHANGE. 



Tin were the 

nd ( )il Exchange in the formal 
ii hdil tor the week ending Wednesday, 
Januarj 24: 

ited Oil — 



43, ?4ii <h.ira at 

-hares at 

Caribou ( )il — 



Fort* Oil— 

>n-< at 

Hume Oil — 

I 

Independence Oil — 

4.4' >i i shares at 

Junction Oil — 

1,500 shares at 

1,500 shares at 

-hares at 22 

Kern River Oil — 

35 shares at 10.00 

Kern Oil (Old)— 

Mill shares at 7.50 

Monte Cristo Oil — 

shares at 

( )ccidental Oil — 

1,100 shares at 

Oil City Petroleum — 

4. Si II I shares at 



.30 



.47 
.45 

.2'' 

.20 
.21 



.82' 



.06 



2,000 shares at 
Souvereign Oil — 
50 shares at 



.70 



.30 



Twenty Eight Oil — 

400 shares at 12.00 

Following are the latest quotations for stocks 
of oil companies listed on the California Stock 
and Oil Exchange: 

Bid. 

Apollo 

Ass. Oil Co. Stk. Tr. Cer. .29 
Caribou 



Central Point Con. . . . 

Chicago Crude 

Claremont 

Coalinga & Pacific .... 

F.speranza 

Fauna 

Forty 

Four 

Giant 

Home 

Imperial 

Independence 

Junction 

Kern 

Kern (New) 

Kern River 

Monarch of Arizona . 

Monte Cristo 

Nevada County 

Occidental of W. Va. . 
Oil City Petroleum . . 

Peerless 

Petroleum Center . . . 

Piedmont 

Pittsburg 

Reed Crude 2.00 

S. F. & McKittrick 

Senator 70 

Sovereign 30 

Sterling 2.00 

Superior 04 

Thirty-Three 6.00 

Toltec 25 

Twenty-Eight 12.00 

Union 70 

Wabash 30 

Wolverine 40 



.70 
.24 
.70 
.90 

1 . 00 

.47 
.55 
.25 
.44 

"!29 

.21 

7.00 



.80 

'.05 
.68 

'62 
.07 



Asked. 

.38 

.30 

8.00 

.80 



1 


.80 
.25 


.02 
.48 




15 


.46 
.50 



.25 

7.50 

.30 

10.00 
.30 
.85 
.40 
.06 
.70 

14.00 



.15 

3.66 

"33 

iiloo 



Flow of Natural Gas 
Increased by . . . 

Cooper's Gas Lift 

Also flow of water 
or oil Increased and 
gas saved 

A. S. COOPER, C. E., 

219 Crocker Building 
San Francisco, Cal. 



ALEXANDER & CHURCH 

Attorneys and Counselors at Law 



Will draw legal instruments oi 
all kinds, practice in all courts, 
organize corporations, and attend, 
In general, to other law business 
for corporations and others. 



Office, 404 Croseley Building 



SAN FRANCISCO 

Telephone Main 5S7 



..OIL TANKS.. 

Oil Stills, Car Tanks, Riveted Pipe, Storage Tanks of 
every capacity and every description, write for Estimates 

WM. GRAVER TANK WORKS 



77 Jackson Boulevard 



CHICAGO, ILL. 



North Machine Co. 

JOHN G. NORTH, President and Manager 

Machinists and Engineers 

115=117 Beale St., San Francisco, California 

\A/E make a specialty of Oil Well Tools and are always 
ready to quote prices on Fishing Tools, Hand Tools, Etc. 

WRITE US TO-DAY ! 
If you want to invest your money in a sound business proposition where you are sure 
to receive ten dollars for every one dollar invested 

BUY BUFFALO-CALIFORNIA OIL STOCK. 
This company is incorporated under a special act of Congress providing for the incor- 
poration of companies in the District of Columbia, making our stock absolutely non-assessable 
We hold some of the most valuable oil property in the well known 

HALFMOON BAY DISTRICT, 
San Mateo County, California, 
Now possessing many fine oil wells producing 52° to 55° gravity oil. But we cannot tell it all 
here. Write us for full particulars. 

Correspondence with reliable brokers and agents solicited. 

BUFFALO-CALIFORNIA OIL CO, 

Fletcher Block, 

Livermore, California. 

C. V. Hall Iron Works 

Los Angeles Office, 222 Wilcox Buildng, LOS ANGELES, CAL. 

All kinds of Oil Well Tools. 
Very Best Materials 

Fishing Tools and Heavy Forging and 
Machine Work 

ASK YOUR SUPPLY HOUSE FOR 

C. V. H. TOOLS 

The C. V. H. Chain Tongs can be had through 
any dealer in oil well supplies. 

Jlddress 

CHARLES VICTOR HALL 

222 Wilcox Building, Los Angeles, California 




12 



PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 



ADOLPH L. STONE 

Crude Oil and Asphalt Broker 

Contracts for Crude Oil in the Santa Maria, Kern River and Coalinga Districts 
California Asphalt Shipments arranged for all parts of the world 

AM grades Asphalt for Street Paving, Roofing, Varnish Manufacturers, Etc. Samples on application 

Office, 137 Montgomery Street ... Xs\n T5Vs»r»*-i«B«-r» C^al 

Mail Address, P. 0. Box 2520 - - - aan * railClSCO, ^ al - 



We manufacture the best 
lubricating oils for oil 
drillers 

KING KEYSTONE OIL CO., 
204 Front St., San Francisco 



FOR SALE. 



1000 shares Pinal Oil stock at $3.60 per share. 

3000 shares Brookshire Oil stock at $1.00 per 
share. 

W. E. BARNARD, 
476 Tenth Street, Oakland, California. 




NOTES. 



H 



KROHN 

WIRE ROPE SOCKET 

THE ONLY SOCKET USING A BALL CLUTCH 



LASTING QUALITIES UNEQUALLED 



PATENT 



CLUTCH 




DEVICE 



For Sale by ALL 

OIL WELL SUPPLY HOUSES 




LLEWELLYN IRON WORKS 

SOLE MANUFACTURERS 

LOS ANGELES, CAL. 



Write for Circular 




M. W. McQuigg, president of the Independ- 
ent Oil Producers' Agency, was in the city dur- 
ing the week. 

W. E. Youle, one of the oldest of California 
oil operators, is in San Francisco on business. 

The Claremont Oil Company has declared a 
regular monthly dividend of 1 cent per share 
on the capital stock of the company, amounting 
to $5,000, payable February 1. 

The Home Oil Company has ree-lected the 
old board. The daily product is 150 barrels of 
oil. 

The Associated Oil Company has declared its 
first semi-annual dividend, of one and one-half 
cents, or $315,000, payable February 1. At the 
annual meeting the old directors and officers were 
re-elected for the ensuing year. 

In a report from Beaumont, Texas, it is 
stated that the total runs of Texas oil from 
Port Arthur and Sabine for 1904 is estimated 
at 10,801.500 barrels. Estimate of stocks of oil 
on hand in Southeast Texas January 1, 1904, 
7,500,000 barrels. Estimate of production in 
Southeast Texas in 1904, 19,444,300 barrels. 
Estimate of movement and consumption in 1904, 
19,000,450 barrels. Indicating gross stocks on 
hand January 1, 1905, 7,943,850 barrels. 

A complete drilling outfit has been started for 
the Muddy Basin section, near Rawlins, Wyo., 
to drill for oil. The Oil Wells Drilling Syndi- 
cate of Pittsburg is behind the movement. The 
iondications are said to be very good. 

Recent cuts in the price of crude oil have 
failed to produce the expected decrease in the 
output of the Kansas fields, December figures 
shewing an increase and the Standard, in spite 
of its extensive preparations, is unable to handle 
all of the product. 

The following dividends have been declared : 
Four Oil, monthly, of one cent, $3000, payable 
January 1 6 ; Oil City Petroleum, monthly, of 
one-half cent, $2500, payable February 1 ; 
Twenty-eight monthly, of 15 cents, $9000, pay- 
able February 1; Union Oil, quarterly; United 
cents, $70,000, payable January 16; United 
Petroleum, quarterly, of $1.15, $16,882, pay- 
able January 16. 

Thirty-two years ago the Standard Oil Com- 
pany was an Ohio corporation, with a million 
dollars capital, having a daily capacity for refin- 
ing 1500 barrels of crude oil. The Standard 
Oil Company of to-day is a New Jersey corpor- 
ation, which controls 90 per cent of the East- 
ern oil production. It makes 21,500,000 barrels 
out of 24,000,000 barrels of petroleum products 
rr.ade in this country. Its receipts are enormous. 
For five years its annual dividends have aver- 
aged about $45,000,000, or nearly 50 per cent 
on its capitalization — a sum which capitalized 
at 5 per cent would be $900,000,000. 






OIL All Fully Equipped We Have 

WELL 



SUPPLIES 



EXCLUSIVELY 



# 



THE LARGEST STOCK 

ON THE 

PACIFIC COAST 






R. H. HERRON CO. 



509 Mission St. 

SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 



5 



STORES 



PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 



Vol. 6. No. 14 



San Francisco, Cal., Saturday. Feb. 4, 1905 



Price IO Cents 



PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 

Published Weekly. 

The Oil Authority of the Pacific Coast. 
Endorsed by California Petroleum Miners' Ass'n, 



AIMS BLOW AT STATE'S 
GREAT INDUSTRY 



Mvrta R. Winn'. Proprietor. 

i\v, Tditor an<! Manager. 



OFFICE AND EDITORIAL ROOMS 

318 Pine Street - - San Francisco, California 
Telephone, Bush 176. 



TERMS. 

One Year #2.50 

Six Months 1.50 

Three Months 1.00 

Single Copies 10 

STRICTLY IN ADVANCE. 



Money should be sent by Postal Order, Draft 
nr Registered Letter, addressed to Pacific Oil 
REPORTER, 318 Pine Street, San Francisco, rooms 
31-32-33. Communications must be accompanied 
by writer's name and address, not necessarily for 
publication, but as a guarantee of good faith. 

Entered in the Postoffice at San Francisco, Cal- 
ifornia, as second class matter. 

Latest Quotations 



Following are the latest quotations for Califor- 
nia crude oil at the wells as offered by the Pa- 
cific Coast Oil Company: 

COALINGA. 

Price 
Gravity at 60 deg.. temperature, per barrel. 



Oil of 22 deg., up to, but not 



ncluding24..$0.20 



.30 
.35 
.40 
.45 
.50 
.55 



Oil of 24 deg., up to, but not including 25 . 
Oil of 25 deg., up to, but not including 26. 
Oil of 26 deg., up to, but not including 27. 
Oil of 27 deg., up to, but not including 28 . 
Oil of 28 deg., up to, but not including 29. 
Oil of 29 deg., up to, but not including 30. 

The Associated Oil Company is offering 17 1 /-; 
cents for fuel oil. 

SANTA MARIA. 

Gravity at 60 deg. Price per barrel 

Temperature. at Port Harford. 

24 deg. up to but not including 25 $ .25 

25 deg. up to but not including 26 30 

26 deg. up to but not including 27 35 

27 deg. or better 40 

KERN RIVER. 

All oil of 14 deg. gravity or better, except that 
contracted by the Pacific Coast Oil Co., is being 
taken by the Associated Oil Company at 18 cents 
per barrel under a year's contract with the Inde- 
pendent Agency. 

EASTERN QUOTATIONS. 

Pennsylvania $1 . 42 

Tiona 1 .57 

Corning 1 .09 

Newcastle 1-34 

North Li